Cardiovascular Health

Are We Deficient in Essential Nutrients?

Are We Deficient in Essential Nutrients?

Submitted by: Adrian Joele

To answer this question , let’s look at some official government figures in America to see how the degraded foods that most people eat do not provide sufficient nutrients. I would imagine that similar results could be found in other developed countries, like Europe and Australia.

The Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (HANES 1) studied 28,000 people, from age 1 to 74, in sixty-five different areas throughout the United States. HANES 1 examined people’s diets, their blood nutrient levels and any malnutrition symptoms.

It found huge dietary deficiencies by using very conservative levels as a norm.

For example: nine out of ten women had iron deficiency in their diets (less than 18 mg). One in every two women had calcium deficiency (less than 600 mg). Iron deficiency in the blood was widespread in all age, sex, race and income groups, despite the fact that white bread and cereals in America are “enriched” with iron. overall, more than 60% of these people showed at least one symptom of malnutrition, regardless off their income level.

The Ten State Nutritional Survey of 86,000 people found similar evidence. In Michigan for example, more than half the men and women tested were deficient in folic acid. In Texas and Washington one in every four men and one in every three women were deficient in vitamin A. One in three persons in Southern California was deficient in vitamin B2 (riboflavin).

These were very conservative figures of the values of the RDA’s as representing adequate nutrition. Nevertheless, about two thirds of these people were malnourished even though the number of nutrients tested for deficiency was only a fifth of the 59 nutrients essential for optimal health.

A third government study showed similar results. The Nationwide Food Consumption Survey of 15,000 households found that one household out of three ate diets deficient in calcium and vitamin B6. One in five households ate diets deficient in iron and

vitamin A.

A recent report from the USDA examined another 37,785 people.

It analyzed intakes of only 11 of the essential nutrients. Results showed that the fast majority of subjects ate less than the RDA for vitamin A and B6 and minerals, calcium, iron and magnesium.

It get worse with older people.A new study of older American by Dr. Jacob Selhub at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center at Tufts University, examined diet and blood levels of just three nutrients: folate, vitamin B6 and B12. They found that 60% of these seniors got insufficient folate to prevent high levels of homocysteine in their blood, a proven risk factor for heart disease. The worst finding was that 80% of subjects were getting the RDA for folate, but that level of intake was clearly insufficient to keep them healthy.

In an accompanying editorial to the study, published in the very conservative Journal of the American Medical Association, Professors Meir Stampfer and Walter Willet of Harvard University concluded: “a reasonable argument can be made for recommending….. multi-vitamins for many individuals”.

I can go on with many more studies with similar results, but I will not make it boring for you with endless examples.

The evidence we have reviewed should be sufficient to show without a doubt that average people eating the average degraded American food are seriously deficient in essential nutrients.

Many thousands of people are now aware of these problems with our food, resulting in a movement to go back to organic farming. However, it will take decades before even a quarter of American agricultural land is detoxified and then restored by years of mulching, manuring and crop rotation, to regain the nutrient-rich soils of our forefathers. Meanwhile, you have to protect yourself.

You can restore your personal nutrient levels by using the right vitamin and mineral supplements.The best way to supplement your diet with nutritional supplements is to visit this site:http://nutrobalance.net



About the Author: Adrian Joele became interested in nutrition and weight loss when he was working for a nutritional supplement manufacturer. He wrote several articles about health and nutrition and achieved expert status with Ezine http://Articles.com Get his free report on nutrition and weight loss by visiting: http://www.nutrobalance2.net

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Monkey Bars Give You A Total Upper Body Workout

by

Joseph

When you're looking for ways to become physically stronger, I suggest that you incorporate body weight exercises as part of your routine. Pushups, pull ups, chin ups and dips do wonders for the body. There's nothing like working out against your own body weight. 

Today, I'm going to add a new exercise to the repertoire. I'm talking about the monkey bars. 

The monkey bar exercise is simple enough: start at one end of the bars and move down to the other end. But it's the how which is all the fun!

How to do the monkey bar exercise

You'll need a monkey bar for this exercise. You should be able to find monkey bars at most playgrounds, outdoor fitness courses and some indoor gyms.

  1. Stand under the first bar.
  2. Use your leg muscles to propel you toward the bar.
  3. Grip the bar with both hands.
  4. Quickly grip the second bar with your left hand.
  5. Now, grip the third bar with your right hand. 
  6. Grip the fourth bar with your left hand.
  7. Continue the process until you reach the end of the monkey bars.
  8. Repeat the process going in the opposite direction.

The monkey bar exercise requires a great deal of upper body strength, good motor coordination, and endurance. 

The monkey bar exercise strengthens your shoulders, wrists, forearms, back and abdominal muscles. You're propelling yourself from bar to bar without losing your grip. The monkey bar exercise has an aerobic component, too. You're moving quickly which requires oxygenated muscles. The faster your heart beats, the more oxygen pumped to your muscles and the more calories burned.

You can't do monkey bars with an assist. The best way to learn the monkey bar exercise is to get up there and do them.

 

But even if you should suffer for what is right, you are blessed. "Do not fear what they fear ; do not be frightened." 1 Peter 3:14

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I'm living fit, healthy and happy(SM). Are you?

 

"Monkey Bars Give You A Total Upper Body Workout" copyright © 2017 Living Fit, Healthy and Happy(SM). All Rights Reserved.

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You Choose to React or Respond

You Choose to React or Respond

You Choose to React or Respond

By: Daniel Sitter

Choices abound. Sometimes choices confound us, while at other times, certain choices are rather obvious. Any way you approach the subject, choices present opportunities to either excel or hinder. As human beings, we were endowed by our Creator with the power of choice. It is one of the factors that differentiate persons from animals. Some people make these choices or decisions more easily than others.

Each day, we must decide how we will spend our precious twenty four hours and deal with all that the world presents to us. We choose how we will be affected by both everyday occurrences and those that are much more extraordinary. Whether consciously or unconsciously, we choose to either react or respond. These are not the same, for one is negative and one is positive. Which we choose may have a significant impact on our life and possibly those close to us.

Reacting to outside influences, usually beyond our control is generally a negative choice. Reacting implies that we have given charge of the situation to someone or something else. We surrender our input and any control in the matter. We are now at the mercy of the situation and are forced to be in reaction mode where we are constantly dodging bullets and expending great amounts of energy just to stay afloat. In reacting to a situation, we do not anticipate that which is to come because we are too busy handling the present. The future then surprises us and the whole mess begins again.

Responding to a situation is a positive choice. It is the opposite of reacting. It is proactive and anticipates that which is yet to come. Responding is preceded by thought and often prayer. In responding, we take charge and have command over how the situation impacts us. We also have control over how it affects us internally. We decide upon the level of personal impact.

Our lives, families, careers and other everyday activities and interests are operating at breakneck speeds and appear at times to be accelerating. One thing is for certain, the old days of sitting around on the front porch each evening listening to Mother Nature are gone for many of us. The pace of life in Mayberry, as healthy and tranquil as it would appear, is unfortunately a thing of the past. We live life on the fast track.

A major news weekly magazine is currently featuring material devoted to stress and distress in our lives and their effects on our cardiovascular health. Although not totally surprising, this information is disturbing. How did we ever get to this point? Witness the number of television commercials and magazine advertisements for gastric distress, acid reflux, anxiety, depression, headaches and other ailments that are increasing in frequency. There are millions of prescriptions written each day for these medical conditions, most of which will find their roots in internalized stress and distress.

People spend many hours of their lives worrying. Worry is a senseless, energy robbing activity that has engulfed many. No one has ever benefited from worry, yet countless people engage in it. Worry is the opposite of faith. Worry is negative while faith is positive. There is no mystery here. Many books have been written on the subject. The conclusions are the same: "Don't Worry, Be Happy" and "Stop Worrying and Start Living" are among the many themes presented. Good advice indeed.

Most areas of life present us with choices. We must choose either to respond or react to circumstances. We choose whether or not to worry. Learn to be aware that you have a choice in these matters. Learn that there are ways that you can deal with everything either positively or negatively. Learn that your choices may influence your very health, both physical and mental. Learn that there will be costs associated with poor choices, worrying and negativity in general. These may include social, monetary, peace of mind and time costs. Certainly, the total cost associated with negative choices is too high.

Learn that positively responding to circumstances in life will significantly reduce or eliminate worry and contribute to your overall good health and well being. Find joy in life. Be happy.

 

Author Bio
Daniel Sitter is the author of the popular, award-winning e-book, Learning For Profit. Designed for busy people, his new book teaches simple, step-by-step accelerated learning skills, demonstrating exactly how to learn anything faster than ever before. Learning For Profit is currently available at the author's web site www.learningforprofit.com and from numerous online book merchants. Mr. Sitter, having expertise in sales, marketing and personal development, is a frequent contributor to several publications.

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What Is the Best Cardio For Weight Loss?

What Is the Best Cardio For Weight Loss?
By Russell Leggette

While cardio plays an important role in weight loss, this should be combined with proper diet if the long-term benefits are still to be achieved and maintained. In fact the right diet is a key factor while trying to cut weight and improve your overall health. However, when it is combined with the right cardio exercises for weight loss as well as weight training programs, the combination will bear more fruits. So what is the best cardio for weight loss?

This will depend on your physical capabilities, personal preferences and limitations. If you are the type that loves jogging, you should go for a job. If walking is your thing, then you should walk. Whether it is playing basketball or a combination of different activities, you will need to choose an activity that is suited to your need. The key thing here is to ensure that you select an activity that you enjoy daily and ensure that you are consistent with it. You can expect to lose around 1 or 2 pounds every week. If you stick with this number in the long-term, you will definitively see success. Here are some other cardio activities that are worth considering.

Speed walking

This could be through indoor track, treadmill or even outside. One research concluded that overweight women who engaged in speed-interval walking workouts that lasted for 45 minutes for each session combined with weight training toning workouts for 4 times in a week were able to lose 23 pounds within a period of 16 weeks. You can walk in the evening and explore the new areas in your neighbourhood so as to keep the walk interesting and fun.

Jogging

This is an exercise that we all understand. All you will need to do is to jog at your desired speed. Also ensure that you have the right footwear so that you do not get blisters.

Stationary bike

This is a key exercise for toning the legs on top of burning calories. As you exercise on a stationary bike, it is important to ensure that the machine has been set in enough resistance. This will help you to avoid peddling yourself off from the bike and if necessary, you can sprint.

Elliptical machine

You can start by setting the machine in a comfortable level and ensure that you continue in your own pace to ensure that you workout hard enough in a way that enables you to burn the right calories. Engaging in some short high intensity intervals for a period of 30 to 60 seconds will work very well and the exercise will enable you to sweat much. Ensure that you have 3 to 5 minutes of cooling down.

Basketball

You can choose to shoot baskets on your own or you engage in a game with friends. Ensure that you remain constantly on the move, running to the court ends while using both baskets. For the best cardio to lose weight, contact Muscle Prodigy.

If you really want to learn best cardio workouts for weight loss, cardio exercise is only one part of a weight-loss plan. Here are some general cardio guidelines for weight loss.

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The Amazing Flaxseed And Diabetes Natural Treatment Connection Revealed

The Amazing Flaxseed And Diabetes Natural Treatment Connection Revealed
By Terry Robbins

A simple seed, but so many benefits. If flaxseed is not part of your diet, you are missing out whether you have diabetes or not. For diabetics, there is an amazing connection between flaxseed and diabetes for those looking for a natural cure (type 2 diabetes) or a way to manage blood sugar levels naturally.

The many health benefits of flaxseed

Before cotton became affordable, flax (Linum usitatissimum) also known as linseed, has a fibrous stem which was woven into cloth and is still used in this way today despite the prevalence of cotton, but the oil which was produced from the flaxseed has been used medicinally for thousands of years. It wasn't until about a thousand years ago that people started eating flaxseed for health and well being. The health benefits of flaxseed include but are not limited to;

1. Cancer

Flaxseed contains the most amount of lignans when compared to other plants. The amount of lignans in flaxseed is about 7 times more than that in its closest competitor (sesame seeds) and as much as 3,200 more than peanuts.

Lignans contain very powerful antioxidants which are crucial for preventing the damaging effects of free radicals in the body. Free radicals are unstable oxygen molecules that in order to stabilize or "heal" themselves, "steal" particles from healthy cells but this only ends up creating more free radicals. The effects of free radicals on the body are thought to increase the risk of developing various chronic diseases and conditions including cancer.

Lignans are particularly beneficial for reducing the risk of breast cancer. Estrogen which is the female hormone can stimulate the growth of cancer but lignans in addition to antioxidant benefits also contain phyto(plant)estrogens, which mimic the action of the estrogen produced by the body but are less potent.

These chemically weaker phytoestrogens bind to estrogen receptors in the body and this helps to stop the effects on the body of the much stronger estrogen produced by the body which allows excessive amounts of this much stronger estrogen to be eliminated from the body which helps to reduce the risk of breast cancer.

Studies have shown that women who consumed lignan reduced their risk of developing breast cancer by about 62 percent when compared to women who did not consume lignan.

Lignans are also beneficial for fighting against prostate cancer as has been shown in various research studies.

Other cancer fighting properties of flaxseed emanate from the polyunsaturated fats including omega-3 fatty acids as well as fiber that it contains. These compounds in addition to lignans help to promote health and well-being and reduce the risk of developing various diseases including cancer. The anti-inflammatory properties of flaxseed also help to protect against cancer and many other chronic diseases.

2. Heart attack

Lignans not only provide antioxidant benefits but as mentioned previously are also a rich source omega-3 fatty acids of which alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is the main type and ALA is able to lower the risk of suffering a fatal heart attack.

3. Cholesterol

Flaxseed is also able to lower the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol which is dangerous and can lead to heart disease. Flaxseed is rich in a type of soluble fiber that is beneficial for the body which is known as mucilage. This mucilage is tied to the cholesterol lowering properties of flaxseed.

4. Kidney disease

Research has shown that the lignans and omega-3 fatty acids contained in flaxseed are able to reverse the damage to the kidneys caused by lupus which is an autoimmune disease.

5. Hot flushes

The lignans or phytoestrogens contained in flaxseed can be beneficial for women dealing with the various symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes. The estrogen levels of women going through menopause usually start to decrease and instead of going through hormone therapy, phytoestrogens are a natural alternative as they can be used to replace some of this estrogen that is no longer produced by the body because estrogen can help to reduce the severity of hot flashes and phytoestrogens can help with this.

Flaxseed and diabetes

Soluble fiber galore

The connection between flaxseed and diabetes is related to the mucilage that was discussed previously which is the soluble fiber that is available in high amounts in flaxseed. This soluble fiber has been shown by various studies to be able to reduce blood sugar levels which is important to not only manage diabetes but to also cure it naturally.

Diabetes results when the body does not produce any or enough of the hormone insulin or the insulin produced becomes inefficient and/or ineffective (insulin resistance) leading to the accumulation of glucose or sugar in the blood. Insulin is supposed to remove this glucose from the blood and transfer it to the various cells in the body where it is used for fuel or energy for day to day activities.

When insulin is unable to perform its duties, this glucose accumulation in the blood can increase the risk of developing diabetes or leading to diabetes related complications (heart and kidney disease, limb amputations, diabetic coma, etc).

One aspect of managing diabetes naturally is by following a customized diabetic diet to help control the amount of glucose deposited into the blood.

This is what is so amazing about flaxseed and why it is so important for diabetes natural treatment. The soluble fiber in flaxseed helps to slow down digestion which means that the digestion of the carbs and sugars in the food that we eat and conversion of this into glucose to be deposited into the bloodstream will be slowed down which helps to prevent blood sugar spikes. This shows the importance of flaxseed for diabetes natural treatment.

If you are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, one of the ways of preventing you from developing type 2 diabetes is to increase your intake of this soluble fiber.

Weight loss

Another connection between flaxseed and diabetes is weight loss. Many people with diabetes especially those with type 2 diabetes are overweight. Getting your weight under control is an important aspect of natural diabetes treatment and this is another area that flaxseed can help.

In addition to soluble fiber, flaxseed also contains insoluble fiber (roughage). Both types of fiber are important for weight loss because they help you feel fuller faster and keep hunger pangs away for longer which can help you eat less and help with your weight loss goals. Overweight diabetics who are attempting to lose weight should always increase their fiber intake for the reasons discussed and flaxseed can help with this.

It is also important to remember that many people with type 2 diabetes also deal with high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, heart disease, etc, and as discussed previously, flaxseed can also help with these various health issues.

The connection shown above between flaxseed and diabetes makes this amazing seed crucial and an important part of any diabetic diet.

Getting the most

1. Flaxseed oil and diabetes

Flaxseed oil is produced from the seeds and many people skip out on the seeds and reach for the oil but you may want to think again. You may want to consider passing by the oil firstly because you will not get the all important fiber and secondly because while the oil may contain some health properties, most of the lignans, protein and minerals are found in the actual seeds and not the oil. Since you need fiber as a diabetic, pass on the oil and reach for the seeds instead.

Flaxseed oil is also easily perishable and must be stored in the refrigerator once opened.

2. Must be processed

Flaxseed is available in two varieties i.e. brown flax and golden flax (also known as yellow flax) which generally have similar nutritional compositions.

While some people love to sprinkle whole flaxseed on salads or fresh baked bread, the body cannot process whole flaxseeds. They will simply pass through the body undigested which means that you will not get the full benefits of flaxseed including soluble fiber.

Flaxseed must be processed but the ground flaxseed goes rancid very quickly so store it in the fridge but do not use after 30 days or so. While you can easily find ground flaxseed in grocery stores, it is not as fresh as freshly ground flaxseeds so think about getting a cheap spice or coffee grinder or other seed grinding tool so that you can grind two tablespoons or more of whole flaxseed and have it fresh to use each day to add to smoothies, oatmeal, sprinkled on hot or cold cereal, sprinkled on salads, etc.

While ground flaxseed (flaxseed meal) does not last more than 30 days or so when stored in the refrigerator, whole flaxseed can last 6 to 12 months or 1 to 2 years if stored in the refrigerator.

Safety precautions

Flaxseed is generally safe but it does contain a minute amount of cyanide which is not enough to harm an adult but could possibly harm a fetus or infant so avoid flaxseed if you are pregnant or nursing and do not give it to children under the age of two.

The minute amount of cyanide in flaxseed should not be harmful to most people if you only consume the recommended daily amount which is 2 to 3 tablespoons of ground flaxseed. It is also important to remember that there are usually very small amounts of cyanide that are constantly present in human tissue which are constantly being metabolized so the cyanide in flaxseed should not really be a cause for concern. Other plants such as cruciferous vegetables also contain small amounts of cyanide.

A tablespoon of flaxseed contains about 5 to 6 milligrams of cyanide but for cyanide to be dangerous to the human body, it would have to be in amounts of at least 1,000 milligrams.

Other precautions with flaxseed relate to allergic reactions. Some people may be allergic to flaxseed and if so, stop using it or reduce the dose.

Some people may also experience bloating and flatulence when they first start consuming flaxseed. If so, start with small amounts and gradually build up.

If you have diabetes, you should be eating flaxseed because of the amazing connection between flaxseed and diabetes [http://diabetestype1and2info.com/foods-that-cure-diabetes-the-top-vegetable-that-beats-all-other-vegetables/] natural treatment. For more tips and tricks on how to cure diabetes naturally, visit [http://diabetestype1and2info.com/foods-that-cure-diabetes-the-top-vegetable-that-beats-all-other-vegetables/] and discover the number one vegetable that fights diabetes.

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Reduce Free Radicals: Antioxidants And The Health Benefits Of Olive Oil

Reduce Free Radicals: Antioxidants And The Health Benefits Of Olive Oil

Submitted by: James Zeller

Nutrition used to be something like: “eat fresh food and stay away from potato chips”… now we are told beware of ‘free radicals’ in the body. Antioxidants are supposed to be good for you, but how do we encourage one and fight the other?

“If I’d known I was going to live so long, I’d have taken better care of myself.” -- Leon Eldred

We live in an age where we are beginning to see an awareness developing between eating habits and good health. Several buzz phrases like low carb, high protein, and Hoodia are mentioned as a means to gaining a better life while honing a better physique.

Another phrase that is repeated often is ‘’antioxidants”.

What exactly is an antioxidant and why is it important?

Everyone has what is called ‘free radicals’ that roam throughout the body. These free radicals have the potential to attack the body, primarily in the form of cancer. Antioxidants fight back. A nutrition plan that includes antioxidants can assist in staving off the potential for acute illness due to free radicals.

Drinks such as coffee and tea often have a certain amount of antioxidants, but it is fresh fruit that is especially rich in antioxidants. Fruit, of course, remains high on the list of recommended foods by the U.S.D.A., but it may surprise you to know that extra virgin olive oil as part of a balanced diet can provide as much antioxidant as a piece of fruit.

The health benefits of olive oil remain a delightful discovery for many. It’s not often something that adds significant good taste to a gourmet meal and can also be an extremely healthy choice.

A diet that is lean in saturated fats (red meat) balanced with a healthy dose of fatty acids has pointed to a number of health benefits. Most of the fatty acids that your body may need can be found in extra virgin olive oil.

The health benefits of olive oil extend to the reduction of LDL (bad cholesterol) while increasing the amount of HDL (good cholesterol).

Case Study

The University of Barcelona conducted a controlled study that followed 16 individuals that were advised to refrain from certain foods that contained phenols (an antioxidant designed to attack free radicals). After abstaining for four days the test group was given extra virgin olive oil to determine if this alone could increase the levels of phenol in the body.

50ml of olive oil was provided to test subjects while they refrained from things like butter, nuts, eggs and margarine. After the first day the total intake of olive oil was cut in half. One week later, blood samples indicated elevated amounts of the antioxidants vitamin E and phenols. Oleic acid and monounsaturated fatty acids were also seen at higher levels - both acids are indicative of lower LDL (bad cholesterol) oxidation.

Some researchers believe that the health benefits of olive oil may still be untapped, and many have indicated regular ingestion of olive oil may be one of the best kept health secrets available.

Beyond its antioxidant properties, extra virgin olive oil has provided significant data to indicate it may also lower blood pressure, reduce the risk of heart disease and aid in the fight against colon cancer specifically.

Isn’t it time to discover the virtues of olive oil for yourself?

About the Author: James Zeller writes for gourmet gift related websites such as www.cruets.com . Here is a selection of balamic vinegar gifts that he found, and a creative collection of kitchen gourmet gifts.

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Cancer and Obesity: Do I Have Cancer?

Cancer and Obesity: Do I Have Cancer?
By Dr. Naresh Parajuli

Cancer and Obesity

Does obesity increase the risk of cancer?

Obesity

Obesity is measured in terms of body mass index (BMI).

BMI determines whether weight is in healthy range or is overweight or obese.

BMI = weight/height squared; For example, for a person weighing 80 kg and 170 m tall, BMI = 27.6

One is underweight if the BMI is less than 18.5

A person is said to have a healthy BMI if it is between 18.5 and 24.9

When BMI is between 25 to 29.9, it is defined as overweight

When the BMI is 30 or higher, the person is said to be obese.

How does obesity increase the risk of cancers?

Obesity increases the risk of cancer in a few ways:

  • Fat tissue in the body produces excess amounts of oestrogen. High levels of oestrogen increases the risk of breast, endometrial, bowel and some other cancers.
  • Obese people have high levels of insulin and insulin-like substances in their blood. These substances may promote the development of certain tumors.
  • Fat cells produce hormones called adipokines that may stimulate growth of certain cancers.
  • Obese people are said to have chronic low-level inflammation which is associated with increased risk of cancer.

What are the cancers associated with obesity?

Obesity is associated with increased risk of cancer of:

  • Esophagus
  • Thyroid
  • Colon and rectum
  • Kidney
  • Pancreas
  • Gallbladder
  • Breast (after menopause)
  • Uterus

What other diseases are associated with obesity?

Besides cancer, obesity is a major risk factor for many diseases including:

  • Diabetes
  • Heart diseases
  • High blood pressure
  • Arthritis
  • Sleep apnoea
  • Depression
  • Asthma
  • Gallbladder problems

How common is obesity?

Obesity has become an epidemic globally. According to World Health Organization (WHO):

  • Obesity has more than doubled since 1980 worldwide.
  • In 2014, more than 1.9 billion adults, 18 years and older, were overweight. Of these over 600 million were obese.
  • 39% of adults aged 18 years and over were overweight in 2014, and 13% were obese.

In the USA, about two-thirds of adults and nearly one-third of children are either overweight or obese.

Australia is today ranked as one of the fattest nations in the developed world. If weight gain continues at current levels, by 2025, close to 80% of all Australian adults and a third of all children will be overweight or obese (MODI).

If the obesity epidemic continues at the present state, despite the new advances in diagnosis and treatment of cancers, the number of cancer cases will increase significantly taking also into account the increasing life expectancy of people all over the world.

According to WHO, one-third of all cancer cases are preventable. The best way to prevent cancer is by adopting healthy lifestyle like eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy body weight, quitting smoking, and reducing/quitting alcohol.

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The Link Between Cardiovascular Disease and Hearing Loss: A Growing Role for Audiologists

The Link Between Cardiovascular Disease and Hearing Loss: A Growing Role for Audiologists
By Dr. Ha-Sheng Li-Korotky AuD, PhD, MD

A growing body of research is showing a significant correlation between cardiovascular disease and low-frequency hearing loss. Moreover, the studies underscore a growing need for Audiologists and Physicians to work in partnership for the best health outcome of patients.

Most of the studies focus on the consequences of decreased blood supply due to cardiovascular compromise, and the downstream negative effects on the inner ear blood vessel health. The inner ear is extremely sensitive to blood flow, and there appears to be a strong relationship between the health of the cardiovascular system (heart, arteries, and veins) and hearing. These studies indicate that a healthy cardiovascular system promotes healthy hearing, but inadequate blood flow and resulting damage to the blood vessels of the inner ear can contribute to hearing loss.

A recent study, Audiometric Pattern as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Status: Development of a Model for Assessment of Risk, suggests that low-frequency hearing loss could be a marker for cardiovascular disease rather than a result of the disease, and low-frequency audiometric patterns can be used probabilistically to predict cardiovascular health. An underlying premise of the study is that vascular aspects (decreased blood supply) of cardiovascular disease show up as abnormalities in the condition of inner ear blood flow before they are revealed in the heart, brain, arteries, kidneys, or eyes, due to the inner ear's extreme sensitivity to blood flow.

Key findings in this study indicate that low-frequency hearing loss could be an early indicator of cerebrovascular disease (an indicator of stroke potential) or a predictor for developing cardiovascular disease. Findings were presented in 2009 at a Combined Otolaryngology Spring Meeting by David R. Friedland, MD, PhD., and published in The Laryngoscope (119:473-486, 2009).

Dr. Friedland summed up the important potential application of the study: "We propose that low-frequency hearing loss is a marker for cardiovascular disease rather than the other way around. Low-frequency hearing loss would thus represent a potential predictor of impending cardiovascular events or underlying disease. We suggest that clinicians may use the audiogram as a sensitive and reproducible screen for cardiovascular compromise".

Considering the strength of the evidence, researchers conclude that patients with an audiogram pattern of low-frequency hearing loss present a higher risk for cardiovascular events, and that appropriate referrals may be necessary, especially if they have no history of vascular compromise.

Audiologists commonly refer patients to Physicians when they suspect medical problems. These studies (and others which will be highlighted in future articles) should promote a call to action for physicians to refer more patients to Audiologists when they suspect hearing loss. Many Audiologists have AuD academic credentials, significant medical knowledge, and the advanced diagnostic equipment necessary to uncover the potential for underlying medical conditions. In any case, these and other studies suggest an increasing role for Audiologists to support the overall health of patients.

Dr Li-Korotky has AuD, PhD, and MD credentials. She is well respected as a researcher and clinician, with 20+ years of rich experience and more than 100 scientific publications.

The Doctor is particularly interested in medical aspects of hearing loss and the growing role for Audiologists to diagnose and predict the probability of underlying medical conditions.

Dr. Li-Korotky is the President of Pacific Northwest Audiology, http://www.pnwaudiology.com and her LinkedIn profile can be found here, http://www.linkedin.com/pub/ha-sheng-li-korotky-aud-phd-md/4a/423/224

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Heart Disease Kills Diabetics

Heart Disease Kills Diabetics
By Paul D Kennedy

About two-thirds of persons over 65 who die from diabetes have heart disease. In fact, the risk of dying from heart disease is several times higher among persons with diabetes compared to non-diabetics.

The Framingham Heart Study is a long-term continuous cardiovascular study of the residents of the Framingham, a town in Massachusetts in the USA. The study began in 1948 with 5,209 adult subjects and the grandchildren of the original subjects are now taking part. Much of our knowledge of heart disease and how it is affected by diet, exercise and various medicines first came to light during this ground-breaking trans-generational study.

Framingham was the first study to show that diabetics are more vulnerable to heart disease than non-diabetics, and that having multiple health issues increases the likelihood of heart disease. The health problems associated with heart disease include diabetes, being overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, smoking, and a family history of early heart disease.

The more risks factors a person has for heart disease, the greater the chance they will develop the disease. In addition, the probability of dying from heart disease is much greater for a diabetic. Thus while a person with one risk factor, such as high blood pressure, will have a particular chance of dying from heart disease, a person with diabetes has two to four times that risk of dying.

One medical study found that people with diabetes who had no other risk factors for heart disease were five times more likely to die of heart disease than non-diabetics. Another study indicated that diabetics were as likely to have a heart attack as non-diabetics who have already had heart attacks.

How diabetics get heart disease

The most common cause of heart disease in diabetics is atherosclerosis (hardening of the coronary arteries) due to a build-up of cholesterol in the blood vessels that supply the heart. This build-up usually begins before blood glucose levels increase noticeably. If you have abnormally high levels of cholesterol there is an 85% chance that you also have diabetes.

Cholesterol is a microscopic ingredient found in the membranes of animal cells, including humans. It holds the thin membranes of your body cells together; without cholesterol your body would collapse into a jelly-like heap. It also has a role in sending signals to your cells along your nerves. In addition, it is the raw material your body uses to make certain hormones, as well as vitamin D.

About 75 to 80% of your cholesterol is made by synthesising other substances inside your body. The rest comes from the animal products you eat. If you eat too much cholesterol, your body will reduce the amount of cholesterol it makes... provided your system is working properly. If not, you will end up with too much cholesterol.

Cholesterol is transported through the blood stream to where it is needed to build cells. Because it is insoluble, it has to be carried within lipoproteins, which are soluble in blood. These can be either low-density lipoproteins (LDL) or high density lipoproteins (HDL). The problem is LDL - when too many particles of cholesterol are being delivered by LDL, they tend to collide and become damaged.

These damaged particles cause plaques (raised bumps or small scars) to form on the walls of the arteries. These plaques are fragile. When a plaque ruptures, the blood around it starts to clot. To contain the rupture, the clot will grow. If the clot grows big enough, it will block the artery.

If an artery that carries blood to your heart becomes blocked, you'll have a heart attack. If the blood vessels in your feet get blocked, you'll end up with peripheral vascular disease. Once you have too much cholesterol in your blood you are on your way to angina, heart disease and stroke, and irreversible damage to the tiny blood vessels in your eyes and kidneys.

How diabetics can be treated for heart disease

Depending on its severity, heart disease in persons with diabetes can be treated in several ways. These include:

  • Aspirin therapy
  • Diet
  • Exercise
  • Medications
  • Surgery

Aspirin therapy

For type 2 diabetics who are aged over 40 and are at high-risk for heart disease and peripheral vascular disease, a daily low-dose of aspirin reduces the risks of the clots that lead to heart attacks and strokes.

Diet

A plant-focused diet such as the one that I recommend for treating diabetes will also help treat hard disease. This easy to follow diet means that you eat food that is... natural... low in sugar... low in fat... low in salt... high in fibre... with low GI values... which is mostly plants. You also need to avoid eggs and dairy products, and drink plenty of water.

This is not a vegetarian or vegan diet as you can still eat meat provided it is ultra-lean. However, early studies do indicate that a vegan diet may have a number of benefits for persons with heart disease but more research is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

Exercise

As well as helping you lose excess weight, regular exercise will improve your blood glucose levels, high blood pressure, cholesterol levels and to decrease abdominal fat, all of which are risk factors for heart disease.

Both aerobic and anaerobic exercises increase the mechanical efficiency of the heart. Aerobic exercise increases cardiac output (the volume of blood being pumped by the heart) and anaerobic strength training increases the thickness of your heart muscles.

The beneficial effects of exercise on the cardiovascular system have been well documented. A study that tracked physical activity among adults with type 2 diabetes over 19 years found that those who undertook at least four hours a week of moderate exercise were about 40% less likely to succumb to heart disease than sedentary people. They also cut their risk of getting a stroke.

Medications

Many medications are used to treat heart disease. Here's a sampling:

ACE inhibitors widen or dilate blood vessels to improve the amount of blood the heart pumps and to lower blood pressure. Angiotension II Receptor Blockers reduce chemicals that narrow the blood vessels, allowing blood to flow more easily.

Antiarrhythmics are used to treat abnormal heart rhythms resulting from irregular electrical activity of the heart. Blood thinners or anticoagulants, such as Warfarin, help prevent clots from forming in the blood. Antiplatelets prevent the formation of blood clots. Clot busters are used in thrombolytic therapy to break up blood clots.

Beta-blockers are one of the most widely used drugs for high blood pressure and are a mainstay in the treatment of congestive heart failure. Calcium channel blockers relax blood vessels and increase the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart while also reducing the heart's workload. Digoxin helps an injured or weakened heart work more efficiently to send blood through the body.

Diuretics help get rid of unneeded water (which makes it easier for the heart to pump) and salt (a cause of high blood pressure) through the urine. Nitrates are vasodilators used to treat angina in persons with coronary artery disease or chest pain caused by blocked blood vessels of the heart.

As you can see, most of these medications mitigate the various deleterious effects of heart disease. But they don't actually cure the disease. Once you start taking them you have to continue for the rest of your life.

Surgery

There are many surgical techniques for treating heart disease. These range from the insertion of simple stents to heart transplants.

Stents are small expandable tubes used to reinforce weakened arteries or to open up arteries that have been narrowed by the build-up of plaque. In heart-bypass surgery the problem of blocked coronary arteries is overcome by creating a new pathway to the heart for the blood. Heart-valve surgery is used to repair damaged valves in the heart.

People with abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmia) can be treated with cardioversion in which electrical signals are sent to the heart muscle to restore a normal rhythm which allows the heart to pump more effectively. A pacemaker is a small device that sends electrical impulses to the heart muscle to maintain a suitable heart rate and rhythm. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is an electronic device that constantly monitors the heart rate and rhythm and which, when it detects an abnormal rhythm, delivers energy to the heart muscle, causing the heart to beat in a normal rhythm again.

A Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) is a kind of mechanical heart that is placed inside a person's chest, where it helps the heart pump blood throughout the body. A heart transplant is the replacement of a diseased heart with a heart from a healthy donor who has died.

In the main, the purpose of surgery for heart disease is to rectify the underlying condition.

Summary

If you are diabetic, there is a strong probability that you have or will develop heart disease also. The most common cause of heart disease in diabetics is atherosclerosis and if you have cholesterol issues there is an 85% chance that you also have diabetes.

Heart disease can be treated with a combination of aspirin therapy, a plant-focused diet and exercise. There are many medicines for ameliorating the various deleterious effects of the disease. Surgical techniques to rectify the underlying condition range from the insertion of stents to heart transplants.

When you are diagnosed with diabetes, you will probably be checked for heart disease. The diet and exercise regime that will help you beat your diabetes should also be helpful in dealing with your heart disease.

Paul D Kennedy is a type 2 diabetic. He used his skills as an international consultant and researcher to find a way to control his diabetes using diet alone and, about five years ago, he stopped taking medications to control his blood glucose levels. You can find out more from beating-diabetes.com or by contacting Paul at paul@beating-diabetes.com. His book Beating Diabetes is available for download from Amazon or as a printed edition from Create Space online book store.

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Three Most Common Causes For Low Blood Pressure

Three Most Common Causes For Low Blood Pressure

Three Most Common Causes For Low Blood Pressure
By Dr. Dorothy Adamiak, ND

Poor circulation and low blood pressure is more common than generally believed. As health practitioners and patients keep focusing on hypertension, hypotension is usually overlooked or dismissed. Yet, many of us may be experiencing blood pressure dips without being aware of it.

Sporadic bouts of fatigue, chronic exhaustion, frequent yawning, daytime sleepiness, mental dullness, poor memory and even brittle nails all may be signs of insufficient circulation.

The causes of hypotension may vary from person to person and depend on genetic, environmental and circumstantial factors. However, many of those can be controlled, provided that the individual is aware of them. Here is a list of just three most common controllable causes for low blood pressure.

    • Dehydration: Experts say that one should drink 8 glasses of water a day, yet despite this straightforward advice we frequently end up below the guidelines. It is because many of us rely solely on the sense of thirst. Yet, thirst has been found to be consistently unreliable. It simply cannot be used as a hydration gauge.

 

    • Nutritional deficiency: Everyone knows that nutrition is a very important determinant of health. Heart cannot pump without energy and blood cannot flow without being propelled. For that you need nutrients, and lots of them. Yet, a multivitamin won`t do in this case as crucial macronutrients for blood flow must come from food, not from pills. Among the most vital circulatory macronutrients are: sugars, electrolytes, and protein. These three are responsible for increasing blood pressure.

 

  • Adrenal fatigue: Stress, worry, and grief are very hard on the body and if prolonged they may lead to adrenal fatigue or even adrenal exhaustion. Fatigued adrenals alter production of hormones and neurotransmitters which in turn cause changes in the blood flow. Adrenal fatigue is largely an under-recognized phenomenon, although its extreme form called Addison`s disease is a well-known to health practitioners reason for chronic hypotension.

The above conditions are three most common reasons for low blood pressure. Fortunately, they are also easily reversible, especially if one works with a qualified health care provider that is capable of detecting the causes, determining the needs, and also the one that will be assessing the progress.

Causes for hypotention however, are not limited only to dehydration, nutritional deficiencies, and adrenal fatigue. There are also other reasons. Among them are: hidden blood loss, anemia, nervous system failure, dysautonomia, food sensitivities, POTS, and others. Regardless of the underlying reasons follow these four simple circulatory boosters below, so you can experience an immediate improvement in your well-being:

    • Keep on drinking plenty of water and if possible drink it extra cold. Cold water has been shown to boost circulation to the same degree as coffee does.

 

    • Do not skip meals; low blood sugar that results from non-eating can contribute to hypotension

 

    • Add a pinch of salt to food; sodium lost during digestion and sweat must be replaced. Insufficient sodium contributes to low blood pressure and chronic fatigue

 

  • Adjust your diet to support adrenals; adrenals need large quantities of vitamin C. Add oranges, grapefruit, kiwis, and lemon to your diet to ensure a good supply of this nutrient.

To read about other reasons behind hypotension visit Dr D's blog http://goo.gl/8Xlhos

For a more comprehensive look, quick tips and permanent solutions to low and fluctuating blood pressure refer to The Guide, a comprehensive read on perfecting circulation: http://amzn.to/1PBZOx8

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