Cardiovascular Health

Babywearing and Baby carriers

Babywearing and Baby carriers

Babywearing and Baby carriers

About Babywearing

History

Babies have been worn for thousands of years in pieces of cloth tied to the parent's body.

Benefits

Babies who are worn cry less, experience less colic, learn more, and are easier to get to sleep. Babywearing helps regulate the baby's breathing, temperature and heart rate. Parents who wear their babies are more productive, have less stressful outings and travel. Babywearing is good exercise. Breastfeeding is more convenient when baby is worn in a sling.

Types of baby carriers

Baby Slings

Ring Slings

A ring sling is basically a long rectangular piece of fabric with 2 rings sewn on one end. The tail of the sling is threaded through the two rings and back through one of the rings. The baby's weight creates dynamic tension and locks the fabric in placed between the two rings.

Shoulder type

The way in which the rings are attached to the fabric will change the way in which the fabric sits on the shoulder. There are infinite combinations of pleats, gathers, and folds that can be fed through the two rings. Different methods will create a wider or narrower shoulder, and more or less spread on the back.

Open Tail VS Closed tail

The tail of a ring sling is the fabric that hangs down loose through the rings. The fabric may either be left loose, which is called an "open tail", or it can be folded into a "closed tail", a narrow strap of fabric. An open tail sling is more adjustable, you can pull on each edge of the fabric to tighten either the top rail of the sling (around the baby's shoulders) or the bottom rail of the sling (between your and the baby's body). A closed tail sling creates a handle that you can pull on to tighten the entire sling at once. Tightening the individual rails is more difficult in a closed tail sling.

Padded rails, padded shoulder, unpadded

Ring slings are available either unpadded, with padded rails, a padded shoulder, or any combination. Most common commercially available ring slings have a closed tail with padded rails, which is the least user friendly combination. Overly padded rails are more difficult to adjust, since the padding can not be pulled through the rings easily.

Pouch/Ring Sling Hybrid

The pouch/ring sling hybrid is a combination of a ring sling with a curved seam like a pouch sling (see pouch sling category below). The hybrid sling can have any shoulder type, and may be padded or unpadded, closed or open tail. Hybrids are usually narrower than ring slings, since the curved seam creates a deeper pocket for the baby. Hybrid slings are sometimes folded in half like a pouch sling, before attaching the rings at the shoulder, which also creates more of a pocket for the baby.

Ring Sling Fabrics

Ring Slings can be made of almost any fabric. Commonly available slings are made of bottom weight woven cotton and cotton blends, twill, sateen, denim and linen. Less common fabrics include jersey knit cotton, silk, wool, cashmere. The wrong side of the fabric will show in the tail of the sling, so if a ring sling is made of a single layer of fabric, it is important that both sides of the fabric be attractive. Ring slings can be made reversible and more supportive by using two layers of fabric.

Rings

The rings used for a ring sling should be tested and made specifically for the purpose. Thin rings, or those with weld marks, are not appropriate and may bend or break under the pressure. Thin rings can bend and slip through one another. Rings with rough weld marks may be abrasive and weaken the fabric.

Length

Ring Sling length is largely based on the wearer's preference. Ring slings can be as short as above hip level, or as long as knee length. If your sling has a pocket, it is good to have the pocket positioned at approximately hip level so that you can reach it easily. Most ring slings are one size fits most, so unless you are very petite or plus sized, you can probably wear almost any ring sling.

Pouch Slings

Fitted Pouches

Fitted, or sized, pouch slings are a simple tube of fabric with one curved end where the baby's bottom is positioned. The tube is folded in half in on itself to form a pocket for the baby. Fitted pouch slings are typically available in 4 to 10 lengths depending on the brand. The more sizes the better, because a snug, high fit is important for the comfort of the wearer. The size of the pouch is determined by the size of the person wearing it, not the size of the baby. It is common for new pouch sling users to wear the pouch too loose.

Adjustable Pouches

Adjustable pouches are the same tube style of sling as a fitted pouch sling, but they have a method of adjusting the length, so that one pouch will adjust over 3 or 4 sizes. This makes the sling wearable through weight gain and loss, and sharable between different caregivers. Each brand will have it's own method of adjustment, available adjustment methods are snaps, zippers, Velcro, or drawstrings. There are also some "semi adjustable" pouches that have a smaller degree of adjustment with a single button.

Pouch Fabrics

Pouches can be made of almost any fabric. Twill, sateen, and polar fleece are the most commonly used fabrics, but you can also find pouches made of jersey knit, silk, wool, hemp, or many other fabrics. If the fabric used is stretchy lengthwise, it is necessary for the length of the pouch to be shorter because the weight of the baby will stretch the sling out. A less stretchy fabric is more supportive for a heavier baby, and you always want the more stretchy direction of the fabric to run widthwise, not lengthwise. Pouches can also be made reversible, with two different fabrics.

Padded Pouches

Most pouches are unpadded, but there are some available that have light padding along one edge of the sling. This is mainly used in the hip carry, it cushions the back of the baby's legs. The padding is also useful for young babies without head control, the padding is worn on the outer rail of the sling and can prop the head up slightly.

Pouch/Wrap Hybrid carriers

Generally made of a very stretchy knit fabric, this type of carrier system usually is made up of one or two fitted pouches, and a short support sash that can be wrapped around the torso, or over one shoulder. Usually more comfortable for lightweight infants, they aren't supportive enough for babies over about 18 lbs. A more versatile alternative to the pouch/wrap hybrid is a stretchy knit wrap.

Wraps

A wrap is a long narrow piece of fabric that can be used in many different positions and can be wrapped around the wearer's body in many different ways.

Stretchy Wraps

Stretchy wraps are made out of cotton or cotton/lycra knit fabric. They are 5 to 6 yards long by about 25 inches wide. Stretchy wraps are most suitable for newborn front carries. Because of the stretchiness of the fabric, you can wrap your self first, and then stretch the fabric and pop the baby in an upright position against your chest. Stretchy wraps aren't suitable for a heavy baby; they tend to sag very quickly.

Woven Wraps

Woven wraps are probably the most versatile, supportive and comfortable carrier of them all. They also take much longer to master, but for a dedicated babywearer with an older child, it is worth it. Woven wraps are available in all lengths from 2.5 to 6 yards long. The length of wrap that you want will depend upon both your size and the positions and wrapping method that you want to carry your child in. They are made of cotton, wool, silk, or hemp. You can find excellent online instructions for the many different methods of wrapping.

Asian Inspired Baby Carriers

Mei Tai

The Mei Tai consists of a usually rectangular center body piece, with 4 long straps, one coming off of each corner. The top two straps go over the shoulders, and the bottom two straps go around the wearer's hips/waist. There are different methods of tying the shoulder straps. They can go over the shoulders like back pack straps, or be crossed over the chest or back of the wearer. The mei tai is typically worn on the wearer's front or back with the baby facing in toward the wearer, though it can be used on the hip or facing out on the front for short periods. Straps can be narrow or wide, padded or unpadded.

Onbuhimo

The Onbuhimo is similar to the Mei Tai, but it has just shoulder straps, no waist straps. There is a ring or loop at each hip that the shoulder straps are threaded through after being wrapped over the wearer's shoulders. The straps can be worn like the Mei Tai, either ruck sack style or crossed. The onbu is usually used as a back carrier with the baby facing the wearer, though it can be used on the front as well.

Podaegi/Hmong

The podaegi and Hmong are similar to the Mei Tai, but generally have a larger, wider body piece (called a blanket) that extends past the wearer's hips, with very long shoulder straps and no waist straps. The Podaegi can be tied over the shoulders like the Mei Tai, or just around the torso above the bust.

Structured Carriers

Back packs

Usually have an aluminum frame with a nylon seat for the baby to sit in. They are suitable for babies that can sit up unassisted. Bulky and heavy, and usually requires assistance to get the baby on the wearer's back.

Hip carriers

Mei Tai style carriers with a buckle around the waist, and a single shoulder strap designed to be worn diagonally across the body, with an older baby on the hip. Many can only be worn on one specific shoulder or the other.

Structured Asian Inspired Carriers

Basically a Mei Tai with buckles, snaps or clips on the waist band and shoulder straps. Widely available for newborns, there are also structured carriers that are suitable for toddlers and preschoolers. Very mainstream looking and accepted by a wider audience than the more traditional baby carriers.

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Author Bio
Sara Gower, President, Slinglings Baby Slings

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How Cancer Starts

How Cancer Starts

Submitted by: Adrian Joele

The process by which normal cells become cancer cells has to do with genetic damage,

that is, the genes that we have inherited become damaged.

Our body is build-up of approximately 75 trillion cells and there are many different

types of cells of every part of our body. They continually replicate themselves.

Each cell has a set of genetic instructions in its center, called the DNA, which controls cell growth, development and replication.

The DNA is the vital component that gets damaged, the chemical blueprint in genes,

in the form of oxidation and the main cause of this is reactive oxygen ( technically

eferred to as reactive oxygen species ) , or the more common name: free radicals.

When DNA is damaged by free radicals, it can replicate a damaged cell.

When this cell replicates itself, it can become cancer.

Cancer is fundamentally an oxidative process and many types of cancers depend on the

conversion of particular molecules in the cells or carcinogenic chemicals to reactive

oxidised forms. The oxidation is largely caused by free radicals.

Oxidation in our body is the main cause of many forms of cancer, heart disease,

atheroclerosis, adult onset of diabetes, cataracts, lung – and liver disorders and

degenerative diseases of the brain.

Every day, the DNA in each cell in our body faces about 10,000 attacks from cell-

damaging forces known as free radicals, which are unstable oxygen molecules

that have lost an electron.

Ironically, both chemotherapy and radiotherapy that are used to treat cance

cause more oxidation.

In healthy living cells, reactive oxygen species are formed continuously during

the process of respiration in the cells.

Although the body is well equipped to repair genetic (DNA) damage, the repair processes

are usually less than 100 % efficient. Despite even extensive repair, oxidized DNA is

usually abundant in human tissues. Significantly, damaged DNA is particularly abundant

in tumors. The damage rate may be up to 10 modifications in each cell every day,

so it is apparent that damage accumulates with age.

The CSIRO Division of Human Nutrition believes that this increase in genetic damage

with age is due to the cumulative effects of free radical damage and dietary and

environmental chemicals that damage genes.

Our bodies have to face daily an over production of free radicals, caused by our polluted environment, stressful lifestyles and mal nutrition. Free radicals are naturally produced as your body turns fuel to energy, you can get them also from stress, smoking and radiation from the sun.

These volatile molecules cruise around your body, trying to stabilize themselves by stealing electrons from other molecules. When they succeed, they create still more free radicals, causing a sort of snowballing procession of damage.

Free radicals don't just occasionally pop up here and there. Up to 5% of the oxygen that each cell uses is converted into free radicals.

Ionising radiation is a potent generator of reactive oxygen species, while tobacco smoke has been found to increase the DNA damage by 35-50%. Other well-known causes include:

many polluting chemicals, including the hydrocarbons from petroleum, many pesticides, the chlorine in town water supplies; iron in access of the body's needs: amines and nutrates.

It is a surprise to see iron, as being one of the essential nutrients, on the 'bad list', yet the effects of excess iron are so significant, that the increased incidence of testicular cancer this century has been attributed to the increasing iron content of the Western diet.

Can our body defend itself against oxidative damage by excessive free radicals?

The answer is: yes! Our body is equipped with very powerful defenses against free radicals and this is largely through antioxidants, which are consumed in the diet or made within our body, and enzymes.

Balance is the key. If there are not enough antioxidants available to neutrolize the free radicals, oxidative stress develops.

The key antioxidants in the diet are the carotenoids, vitamin A ( which we consume or make from carotenoids), vitamin C, vitamin E and the trace minerals selenium and zinc.

The prominent enzymes that destroy free radicals are called: superoxide dismutase, glutathione (particular melatonin) and a host of other natural compounds, such as those occuring in grape seeds and skins (OPC's) and in the herb Ginkgo biloba.

Vitamin E has been extensively researched and there is strong evidence that it is beneficial at much higher intakes than the current RDA (Recommended Daily Allowances) of 15 IU ( International Units). Vitamin E is especially required to protect unsaturated fats against oxidation.

The least amount found to inhibit oxidation is 40 IU per day, with 60 IU/day the minimum to enhance immune response. The Optimal level is 450 IU/day. Up to 800 IU has been found to be beneficial.

The researchers suggest an intake of 135 - 150 IU/day.

To obtain this amount from food, we would need to consume daily almost a kilogram of almonds, or 150 grams of soya oil, or 55 grams of wheatgerm oil, each of which would be not only unpractical, but even a harmful quantity of food.

That's why it make sense to supplement our diet with high quality nutritional supplements (multiminerals and antioxidants) to ensure that the optimal levels are being met.



About the Author: Adrian Joele became interested in nutrition and weight management while he was an associate with a nutritional supplement company. Since 2008 he wrote several articles about nutrition and weight loss and achieved expert status with Ezine http://Articles.com. He has been involved in nutrition and weight management for more than 12 years and he likes to share his knowledge. Get his free report on nutrition and tips for healthy living, by visiting: http://www.nutrobalance2.net

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Medical Scientists Are Investigating New Drugs To Help People With Chronic Kidney Disease With Anemia

by

Joseph

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a serious illness that affects the kidneys - organs which God created to filter waste products from the body. People who have CKD experience a gradual loss of kidney function which is often accompanied by a shortage of red blood cells.

Red blood cells transport oxygen and nutrients throughout the body, when these cells are lost, a person will become anemic. Oftentimes, physicians will prescribe iron pills or other medications that may help the red blood cells transport more oxygen, but they're not always successful.

Unfortunately there is no cure for CKD, the kidneys often continue to lose function over time.

But there is hope. Local doctors are investigating new medicines that may treat CKD anemia.

Perhaps you or someone you know is living with CKD. You could qualify to become a patient in a clinical trial which may offer new options for people with anemia.

As a CureClick Ambassador I want to share this information with my readers because it could be helpful for medically treating people who have CKD. Visit the research sponsor's website to learn more.

 

CureClick Chronic Kidney Disease CKD image

Conditions
Anemia, Chronic Kidney Disease

 

Age Range

At least 18 years old

 

For those of you whom are not familiar with clinical trials, here's some information that you can use:

What Are Clinical Trials?


Clinical trials are research studies to determine whether investigational drugs or treatments are safe and effective for humans.

All investigational devices and medicines must undergo several clinical trials, often times these clinical trials require thousands of people.

Why participate in a clinical trial?

People whom are eligible will have access to new investigational treatments that would be available to the general public only upon approval.

People whom are eligible for clinical trials will also receive study-related medical care and attention from clinical staff at research facilities.

Clinical trials offer hope for many people and gives researchers a chance to find better treatment for others in the future.

 

Disclaimer: I am not participating in this clinical trial. I am providing this information to my readers as a CureClick Ambasssador. Click on the links below to learn about my relationship with Cureclick and why I'm talking about clinical trials.

http://curec.lk/2k8jb9R

 

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Early to Bed Adds Up to Good Health

by

Michelle Stewart

Now when I started this article the other day it was late---too late to chat about sleep deprivation. I just couldn't give advice when I was absolutely doing the opposite. I went to bed. In what seemed like a few minutes I was awakened. It was not the alarm but a phone call at 4 a.m. from a family member locked out of their house!! How ironic is that? I go to bed to get some sleep and end up awake and on the road to take a set of house keys to someone. It was probably sleep deprivation that caused her to forget the keys.

How much sleep do we need?

The amount of sleep varies, but the National Sleep Foundation recommends seven to nine hours for most adults. Now zzzs like anything else can vary based on individuals; some people can manage on six hours while others may need ten hours. Sleep needs are also affected by basal sleep, the amount of sleep your body regularly needs for optimum performance and sleep debt which is the accumulated amount of sleep lost due to poor sleep habits, illness or other factors affecting the quality of sleep.

Now you know I'm all about living the well-being lifestyle and cutting back on sleep is not a good thing. Sleeping hours are needed for the body to rest and rejuvenate. Affects of sleep deprivation can include: obesity, heart disease, diabetes, headaches, lack of attention, delayed motor skills.

Obesity: Research indicates that people who do not get enough sleep have a higher risk of becoming obese. The hormones that influence appetite are thrown out of balance; leptin controls hunger and it decreases, which makes you feel hungrier. Ghrelin the hormone produced by fat cells tells the body you need more fat calories, which creates cravings for foods that are high in fat and carbohydrates. This hormonal imbalance sets the stage for late-night binges on snacks that add up to a heavier weight.

People with poor sleep habits are tired and they often magnify the problem when they avoid or eliminate physical exercise. Regular exercise helps reduce stress, burns off calories and increases energy.

Heart Disease

Lack of sleep can increase stress hormones, which long-term are not good for the heart. Elevated stress hormones can damage blood vessels, leading to elevated or high blood pressure and heart disease.

Diabetes

This too can be a health challenge affected by lack of sleep. Diabetes has long been linked to obesity and being overweight. The fact that people may weigh more than recommended for their body type can be a predictor of the development of Type 2 Diabetes.

Headaches

This ailment falls into the discomfort that people identify as "feeling bad" when they are sleep deprived. There is also research indicating that lack of sleep can trigger headaches in predisposed individuals.

Cognition and Motor Skills

Less than the recommended amount of sleep affects cognitive processes--impaired attention, alertness, ability to concentrate, solve problems and use good judgment. Sleep deprivation can also impair motor skills and hand-eye coordination. In addition during the night, various sleep cycles play a role in "consolidating" memories in the mind. When you don't get enough sleep, it can affect your ability to remember what you learned and experienced during the day.

In our overscheduled days, we may consider a good night's sleep a luxury; that is a myth. Sleep is essential and in order to stay healthy we have to make it a priority.

Take Away: Sleep is essential for well-being. Turn off the television, mobile gadgets, personal computers and all those things that are too stimulating when it is time to turn out the lights.

Michelle J. Stewart is a Registered and Licensed Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator better known as the Nutrition Planner who has been leading the way to a healthier you for more than 25 years. Michelle is a Certified Wellness Coach whose motto is "EAT LESS MOVE MORE". She is a consultant for the food and beverage industry and offers expertise in corporate wellness, weight loss surgery, menu and product development. All opinions expressed are her own. Sign up for Michelle's Free Report 10 Weight Loss Tips for Life when you visit http://thenutritionplanner.com


10 Ways Tame Your Sweet Tooth

10 Ways Tame Your Sweet Tooth

Submitted by: Lorraine Matthews Antosiewicz

Consciously or not, the average American consumes 28 teaspoons of added sugars a day – that’s more than 90 pounds of sugar per year. The American Heart Association recommends women limit their added sugar to just 100 calories per day (6 teaspoons) and men to 150 calories a day (9 teaspoons). So, the bottom line is that most of us eat way too much. Read on to learn why this can be a problem and what you can do about it.

What’s the problem with added sugar?

If you eat or drink too much added sugar it can lead to health problems including tooth decay, overweight and obesity, difficulty controlling type 2 diabetes, higher triglyceride levels, and possibly heart disease. In addition, sugar is made up of “empty calories” — calories unaccompanied by fiber, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. Too much empty calories can crowd healthier foods from your diet.

What’s the difference between added sugar and naturally occurring sugar?

Added sugar is the sugar that manufacturers add to processed foods and drinks while they are being made. Sugar-sweetened beverages such as sodas, energy drinks, and sports drinks are by far the biggest sources of added sugar in the average American’s diet. They account for more than one-third of the added sugar we consume as a nation. Other sources include cookies, cakes, pastries, and similar treats; fruit drinks; ice cream, frozen yogurt and the like; candy; and ready-to-eat cereals. The sugar you add to your food at home is another source of added sugar.

Naturally occurring sugar, on the other hand, is the sugar found in whole, unprocessed foods, such as milk, fruit, vegetables, and some grains. One of the most common natural sugars is fructose, which is found in fruit. Another common natural sugar is lactose, which is found in milk.

How can I figure out how much added sugar I am consuming?

Start by looking at the Nutrition Facts Label (http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/nutrition/nutrition-facts-and-food-labels/the-basics-of-the-nutrition-facts-panel) on your food or drink package. Keep in mind that food manufacturers do not have to list naturally occurring sugars and added sugars separately on the label. However, at least you can see how much “total sugar” is in each serving. If you divide the number of grams of total sugar by four, that’s how many teaspoons of sugar you are ingesting. For example, if the Nutrition Facts Label says that a food or drink contains 40 grams of sugar per serving, that information tells you that 1 serving contains 10 teaspoons of sugar (equal to 160 calories).

Next, check the ingredient list which lists ingredients in order by amount with the largest amount listed first. Look for the word “sugar” or one of its many sweet aliases (http://blog.fooducate.com/nutrition-101/quick-food-facts/sugar-synonyms/). If one of these ingredients is listed among the first few, the food or drink is likely high in added sugar.

How can I cut down on my consumption of added sugar?

To make it easy, here are 10 simple ways to minimize added sugar in your diet:

• Don’t add it to foods. This is the easiest and most basic way to immediately reduce the amount of sugar you’re eating. Biggest targets: cereal, coffee and tea.

• Skip sugary beverages like soda and sports drinks; and choose water instead.

• Limit your consumption of fruit juice. When you do have it, make sure it’s 100 percent fruit juice — not juice drink that has added sugar. Better yet, have fresh fruit rather than juice.

• Choose breakfast cereals carefully. Scan the ingredient list for unwanted sugar and sugar aliases. Try to choose brands that contain more total fiber grams than total sugar grams. Skip the colorful and frosted brands.

• Go easy on condiments. Salad dressings and ketchup have added sugar. So do syrups, jams, jellies and preserves. Use them sparingly.

• If you eat canned fruit, choose the one packed in water or juice, not syrup.

• Cut way back on processed foods. These are often high in added sugar, as well as sodium and fat.

• Skip the cookies, cake, pies, ice cream and other sweets. Instead, choose naturally sweet fruit for your after-dinner treat.

• Watch out for “fat-free” snacks. Fat-free doesn’t mean calorie-free, and most fat-free snacks are loaded with sugar.

• Look for recipes that use less sugar when you are cooking or baking.

About the Author: Lorraine Matthews-Antosiewicz, MS RD, is a food and nutrition expert specializing in weight management and digestive health. She is committed to empowering people through education, support, and inspiration to make real changes that lead to optimal health and lasting weight loss. Take her Free Self-Assessment and learn how you can lose 20 lb. - or more. Jump Start your weight loss today! http://njnutritionist.com/freeassessment

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Get Up and Start Cooking With Margarine

Get Up and Start Cooking With Margarine

Submitted by: Sue Batty

Ever thought about giving up butter and using margarine instead for cooking? If not, then we are here to inspire you with some fantastic reasons why margarine makes a great butter substitute for cooking plus offer some exciting recipe ideas to liven up your lunches, dinners and baking.

First off, cooking with margarine instead of butter is a small step that can help you on your way to a healthy, balanced diet; did you know that the plant oils that margarine is made from contain omega 3 and 6 fats that keep our bodies fighting fit and ready for action? Including margarine in your cooking means that you’ll be increasing your intake of these essential nutrients (which the body can’t produce on its own) while simultaneously cutting down on the bad fats – quality margarine contains less saturated fats than butter and only mere traces of trans fats.

When you’re using margarine for cooking, be it frying up a juicy steak or grilling a delicious kebab, margarine has an extra bonus feature that lots of people don’t know about: it spits out far less when it gets hot like cooking oils and butter often can. Instead, liquid margarine goes clear to let you know that your pan is hot and ready to go – how good is that? Plus it is so versatile that you can use it straight from the fridge, without having to warm it up or wait for it to soften. It makes cooking and baking quicker and easier!

We have loads of great recipes to try online – there are those who swear that cooking with margarine is the key to the perfect curry; margarine can also add a thicker, richer consistency for warming winter soups. Why not try this fantastic margarine powered lasagne from Flora?

Preheat your oven to moderate 170°C (fan assisted), 350°F, gas mark 4. Then place 350g of mince, 1 large, chopped onion and I clove of peeled garlic in a pan and fry, stirring until the beef is browned. Crumble in one Knorr cube and stir in. Add 600g of canned chopped tomatoes, 2-3 tbsps of tomato purée, a handful of freshly chopped herbs; thyme, sage, oregano, pepper etc. and I large glass of red wine. Bring to the boil and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile, cook the 175g of lasagna in boiling salted water for 10–15 minutes, until soft. For the sauce, bring 425 ml milk to the boil with 1 small onion, a carrot and a bay leaf. Leave to infuse for 10–15 minutes with no hear. Strain the milk and place back in the pan with 2tbsps Flora Cuisine and 25g of flour. Stirring constantly, bring to the boil and simmer for 2–3 minutes until thickened and smooth.

Cook in a preheated oven for 30–40 minutes – then serve!

Just six easy steps to a delicious lasagne for the whole family. So you see, switching to margarine for cooking doesn’t mean compromising on taste – with so many varieties of margarine there’s a blend to suit every taste and to fit every lifestyle choice – whether you’re vegan, losing weight, cutting down on salt or trying to lower your cholesterol! And, with so many recipes to inspire and excite, mealtimes need never be boring again!

About the Author: “I’m Sue Batty, the margarine experts, for many years now and I’m also a chef. I always use margarine in my cooking; I always have and I always will, because it’s the obvious healthy, tasty and simple-to-use solution to all of my cooking needs” – For more information and top tips on cooking with margarine, visit http://www.enjoymargarineeveryday.com/cooking-with-margarine

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Does Jogging in Place Have Any Benefits?

by

Kya Grace

Any form of exercise is good as long as it gets you off your couch. If you have been thinking of reasons why going to a gym would not work, surely, you would not back out of staying at home and jog in place while watching your favorite show on the television! Jogging in place is a perfect weight loss program for people who are too pressed for time to go to a gym or feel disinclined to do any other strenuous workouts.

Safe and easy

Jogging in place is safe because you can jog at your own pace, increasing it whenever you want. Start jogging slowly at first, gradually increasing the speed to a rapid sprint and later shift pace to slow jogging. You can stop any time to catch your breath and regulate your breathing. Jogging in place is easy because it does not take up much room nor are there any special moves involved. It can be done indoors regardless of what the weather is like or what time of the day it is.

Inexpensively simple

Jogging in place may not be at par with other high profile fitness workouts, but it strengthens your heart, lungs and legs. It is a very good calorie burner and improves stamina. It is also the cheapest form of exercise as you only need a pair of sneakers. You need not drive to the gym or be a gym member for that matter or hire the services of a trainer to teach you the moves. You do not have to refer books or watch videos to see if you are doing it right either.

Very effective with light weights

Jogging in place can be made more effective by holding a light weight of say, 2 pounds in each hand, to start with. You can add variations to your jogging to make it more effective. For example, by lift your knees alternately, as high as you can rapidly. This will speed up your heart rate and give you proper aerobic workout benefits. Your leg muscles and the pumping of your arms back and forth while jogging will tone and strengthen them.

Effective with natural supplements

An overweight person can reap the benefits of jogging by combining it with a good weight loss program and natural supplements. Green tea is a highly beneficial herb in a weight loss program. It can be taken as a hot or cold beverage soon after jogging, which will help shed weight faster, making it lighter and better prepared for heavier workouts.

To lose weight effectively, jogging in place should be a part of a series of intense training workouts that will attack all the muscles in your body and burn fat. Jogging in place would not prepare you for sustained workouts of great intensity that is required to lose weight effectively though it can used as good warm up before the start of other intense exercises.

Kya Grace is a Sydney personal trainer. If you would like to sign up for a session with expert personal trainer, or to register for bootcamp trial, visit Bootcamps Sydney.


Isometric Exercise - Grandmothers Unite To Lose Weight And Turn Back The Clock

Isometric Exercise - Grandmothers Unite To Lose Weight And Turn Back The Clock

Submitted by: Ellen Miller

Tired of that Boy Scout walking you across the street? Develop new strength and vigor using Isometric Exercise. This simple weight loss and muscle resistance exercise methodology will help you drop ten to thirty-five pounds or more, depending on your goals and needs, and will revitalize your outlook toward life. Aging is inevitable, but growing old is a state of mind. Ten to fifteen minutes a day devoted to isometric weight loss exercise can help you feel ten to fifteen years younger in just a few weeks. You will, in fact, begin to feel the beneficial effects in a mere four to seven days.

Isometric exercise, which requires no equipment, tones you up and burns calories by using the opposing force of your own muscles to create what you may remember from your earlier days as "dynamic tension." Techniques and terminologies may have changed, but the essential concept is the same: what you are accomplishing is a low impact contraction of muscles, thus expending energy without having to fight the feeling. You control your own resistance level, so you are never in danger of "overdoing" it. Efficiency is maximized, and the results are remarkable.

Nutrition, aerobics and strength building are the three central elements of getting yourself back into shape, so eat smart; (don't worry about "dieting;" you've probably been eating better than your kids since they left the nest); keep in motion at a comfortable pace: walking is a good way to start. At the outset, it is not the length of time or the speed at which you walk that matters, but rather the movement itself. Even a casual five or ten minute stroll will increase the blood flow, and thus the oxygen level throughout your body. Duration and pace can be gradually increased as your comfort and confidence rise. With time, you may even find yourself back on the ballroom dance floor.

So how do you start on the road to a more youthful you? As with any exercise plan or lifestyle change, it is recommended that you get your physician's blessing. Fortunately, the range of isometric exercise is flexible enough to accommodate the frustrating ailments of aging. When you are ready to start, you can work with a trainer, find a gym which specializes in isometric exercise or buy an inexpensive DVD. Then grab a chair. Grab a chair? That's right; most of the easily assimilated exercises you will learn and use can be done while seated. The breathing techniques can be employed virtually anywhere at any time. Consider engaging your friends in some of the aerobic activities. You will enjoy the company and the motivation, and unite to fight back the years

The isometric exercise process will enable you to build strength and endurance, without suffering soreness. In less time than you can imagine, you will gain energy, drop those extra pounds, and lose those inches that have taken all the fun out of shopping. You are at a cross-road. Take your path with confidence and zeal. Finally, be polite but firm with that Boy Scout: you can cross the street without his help.

About the Author: Owner of IsoBreathing Inc. and creator of IsoBreathing® Ellen has been teaching life style and fitness over 20 years and is a certified fitness practitioner and personal trainer. Find out about Isometric Exercise, Weight Loss Exercise or buy her Exercise DVD - visit http://www.isobreathing.com.

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Health Food | Health Benefits of Fruits | Natural Nutrition | Health Benefits For All Fruits | Benefits Eating Fruit to Lose Weight | Fruits Juices Benefits

Health Food | Health Benefits of Fruits | Natural Nutrition | Health Benefits For All Fruits | Benefits Eating Fruit to Lose Weight | Fruits Juices Benefits

Submitted by: Medico News

The apple is the pomaceous fruit of the apple tree, species Malus domestica in the rose family Rosaceae. It is one of the most widely cultivated tree fruits.The tree originated from Central Asia, where its wild ancestor is still found today. There are more than 7,500 known cultivars of apples resulting in a range of desired characteristics. Cultivars vary in their yield and the ultimate size of the tree, even when grown on the same rootstock.

At least 55 million tons of apples were grown worldwide in 2005, with a value of about $10 billion. China produced about 35% of this total. The United States is the second leading producer, with more than 7.5% of the world production. Turkey, France, Italy, and Iran are also among the leading apple exporters.

Health benefits for Apple

The proverb “An apple a day keeps the doctor away,” addressing the health effects of the fruit, dates from 19th century Wales. Research suggests that apples may reduce the risk of colon cancer, prostate cancer and lung cancer. Compared to many other fruits and vegetables, apples contain relatively low amounts of Vitamin C, but are rich source of other antioxidant compounds. The fiber content, while less than in most other fruits, helps regulate bowel movements and may thus reduce the risk of colon cancer. They may also help with heart disease, weight loss, and controlling cholesterol, as they do not have any cholesterol, have fiber, which reduces cholesterol by preventing reabsorption, and are bulky for their caloric content like most fruits and vegetables.

There is evidence that in vitro apples possess phenolic compounds which may be cancer-protective and demonstrate antioxidant activity. The predominant phenolic phytochemicals in apples are quercetin, epicatechin, and procyanidin B2.

Apple juice concentrate has been found to increase the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in mice, providing a potential mechanism for the “prevent ion of the decline in cognitive performance that accompanies dietary and genetic deficiencies and aging.” Other studies have shown an “alleviat oxidative damage and cognitive decline” in mice after the administration of apple juice.

The seeds are mildly poisonous, containing a small amount of amygdalin, a cyanogenic glycoside; usually not enough to be dangerous to humans, but it can deter birds.

2. Banana

anana

Banana is the common name for herbaceous plants of the genus Musa and for the fruit they produce. They are native to the tropical region of Southeast Asia, and are likely to have been first domesticated in Papua New Guinea. Today, they are cultivated throughout the tropics.

Banana plants are of the family Musaceae. They are cultivated primarily for their fruit, and to a lesser extent for the production of fibre and as ornamental plants. As the banana plants are normally tall and fairly sturdy, they are often mistaken for trees, but their main or upright stem is actually a pseudostem. For some species, this pseudostem can reach a height of 2–8 m, with leaves of up to 3.5 m in length. Each pseudostem can produce a bunch of green bananas, which when ripened often turn yellow or sometimes red. After bearing fruit, the pseudostem dies and is replaced by another.

Health benefits

Along with other fruits and vegetables, consumption of bananas were associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer and in women, breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma Individuals with a latex allergy may experience a reaction to bananas.

Banana pape

Banana fibre is also used in the production of banana paper. Banana paper is used in two different senses: to refer to a paper made from the bark of the banana plant, mainly used for artistic purposes, or paper made from banana fiber, obtained from an industrialized process, from the stem and the non usable fruits. This paper can be either hand-made or made by industrialized machine.

3. Cranberry

Cranberry

Cranberries are a group of evergreen dwarf shrubs or trailing vines in the genus Vaccinium subgenus Oxycoccos, or in some treatments, in the distinct genus Oxycoccos. They are found in acidic bogs throughout the cooler parts of the Northern Hemisphere. Cranberries are a major commercial crop in certain American states and Canadian provinces see Cultivation and uses below. Most cranberries are processed into products such as juice, sauce, and sweetened dried cranberries e.g. Craisins, with the remainder sold fresh to consumers. Cranberry sauce is regarded an indispensable part of traditional American and Canadian Thanksgiving menus and European winter festivals.

Since the early 21st century within the global functional food industry, there has been a rapidly growing recognition of cranberries for their consumer product popularity, nutrient content and antioxidant qualities, giving them commercial status as a “superfruit”.

Health benefits and potential health benefits

Cranberries have moderate levels of vitamin C, dietary fiber and the essential dietary mineral, manganese, as well as a balanced profile of other essential micronutrients.

By measure of the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity with an ORAC score of 9,584 units per 100 g, cranberry ranks near the top of 277 commonly consumed foods in the United States.

About the Author: Written by Medical News | Cancer News : http://mediconews.com Dental News : http://mediconews.com

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Research Scientists Are Investigating New Treatments To Prevent Heart Disease

by

Joseph

Heart disease is the leading killer of men and women in the United States. In fact, 610,000 people in the US die from cardiovascular disease every year; that's 1 out of every 4 Americans!

Needless to say, our nation needs new treatments for this deadly disease.

This study trial will test the effectiveness of Epanova, a drug already approved by the FDA for treatment of patients with severely high triglycerides to see if it can successfully treat people with moderately high triglycerides.

As a CureClick Ambassador I want to share this information with my readers because it could be helpful for medically treating people who are at risk of heart problems.

For more information visit the research trial sponsor's website.

CureClick heart disease image

 

Important info you need to know:

Patients must:

  • be at least 18 years old
  • be currently taking a statin
  • have high cholesterol

Patients must not:

  • have an allergy to fish, shellfish, omega-3 fatty acid, or corn oil
  • currently be on dialysis

The research study will require 13,000 participants, so please see if you qualify.

For those of you whom are not familiar with clinical trials, here's some information that you can use:

What Are Clinical Trials?


Clinical trials are research studies to determine whether investigational drugs or treatments are safe and effective for humans.

All investigational devices and medicines must undergo several clinical trials, often times these clinical trials require thousands of people.

Why participate in a clinical trial?

People whom are eligible will have access to new investigational treatments that would be available to the general public only upon approval.

People whom are eligible for clinical trials will also receive study-related medical care and attention from clinical staff at research facilities.

Clinical trials offer hope for many people and gives researchers a chance to find better treatment for others in the future.

 

Disclaimer: I am not participating in this clinical trial. I am providing this information to my readers as a CureClick Ambasssador. Click on the links below to learn about my relationship with Cureclick and why I'm talking about clinical trials.

http://curec.lk/2fTTcF4

 

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