Cardiovascular Health

Women and Exercise - The Basics and FAQs

Women and Exercise - The Basics and FAQsWomen and Exercise - The Basics and FAQs by by Sarah Cohen

There are plenty of reasons why women should exercise, but some aren't as obvious as others.

To decrease anxiety
To increase flexibility
To build bone density
To increase lean muscle mass
To improve athletic performance
To control weight and eating habits
To increase cardiovascular health
To increase motor coordination and balance
To decrease risk factor for heart disease, uterine cancer, breast cancer and diabetes

But what constitutes exercise in the first place? There are two main types of exercise:

1. Cardiovascular Exercise walking, running, biking, swimming, rowing, water running, dancing
2. Strengthening Exercises weight training, yoga, pilates, plyometrics, exercise bands

Osteoporosis - The Silent Thief
Osteoporosis is a disease that causes a decrease in bone mass density, resulting in weakened bones that are vulnerable to fracture and deformation. It's referred to as the "silent thief" because fractures are often the first symptom - though by then, the disease is often very advanced. Fractures commonly affect the spine, hips and wrist area. Approximately 12 million Americans are affected by this disease, and it's estimated that nearly 40 per cent of U.S. Caucasian women and 13 per cent of U.S. Caucasian men aged 50 or older will experience at least one fragility fracture (caused by osteoporosis) in their lifetime.

Frequently Asked Questions About Women and Exercise

How does Exercise Help Increase Bone Mineral Density?

Exercise can help to build up your bone mineral density. The vertical trabeculae in the bone are the "weight bearing" structures, and their density can be increased with exercise.
How Does Exercise Decrease the Risk of Heart Attacks?
Regular exercise can alter your cholesterol in just a few months. As little as 30 minutes a day can decrease your LDL (Bad Cholesterol) and increase your HDL (Good Cholesterol).

What is the Best Form of Exercise for Weight Control?

For the majority of the population, a combination of both cardiovascular training and weight training is the most efficient way to control your weight. Recent research shows that a shorter period of interval cardio training (20 minutes divided into alternating 30-second intervals of intense and easy cardio training), along with a 30 to 40 minute weight training program produces the best results in terms of decreased body fat percentage and an increase in lean muscle mass.

How Early Can a Child Begin Regular Exercise?

Children of all ages can and should be exercising regularly. The rates of American childhood obesity are alarmingly high (tripling from 6.5 per cent 20 years ago to 19.6 per cent today). Heavy weight-bearing exercise should be avoided until after puberty, but cardiovascular activity is encouraged at any age.
How Can Walking or Running Alter Premenstrual Symptoms?

Just as our heart and muscles adapt when exercising, so does the endocrine system. Exercise can cause the ovaries to adapt by decreasing the level of estrogen that they produce, which can lead to a decrease in fluid retention, breast soreness, and irritability. Exercise also releases "feel good" hormones called endorphins.

How Does Exercise Help Pre and Post-Menopausal Women?

Studies have shown that exercise helps to relieve and prevent many menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal and urinary irritation, insomnia and depression. Post-menopausal women who exercise are half as likely to develop diabetes.

As a Chiropractor, Kinesiologist and a Personal Trainer Dr. Cohen has ten years experience in athletic training and rehabilitation and is currently working with runners and triathletes at the city, varsity, national and professional levels. Dr. Cohen has been a guest speaker for trainers and athletes at the Toronto and Whistler Can-Fit-Pro Conference, HSBC Triathlon Series Awards Event and Running Room Clinics on various topics including running biomechanics, training techniques and injury prevention and treatment. http://www.fitnessrepublic.com

Article Source: http://www.articlesphere.com/Article/Women-and-Exercise---The-Basics-and-FAQs/251870


The Big Three Men's Health Issues

The Big Three Men's Health Issues

Submitted by: Kya Grace

While men are known to be the stronger sex, quite a few things work in opposition to them. They smoke and drink more than women do. They don’t go for medical aid as regularly as women. Also there are increased levels of stress in case of men. The following are the three major health issues men face most.

Sexual Problems

‘Impotency’ is used to explain medical situations that impede procreation, in ways such as deficiency in sexual craving and the problems with erection and climax. Erectile dysfunction may be an absolute incapacity to have an erection, a fluctuating capacity to do it, or a propensity to only have short-lived erections. The variations in one’s erectile dysfunction are difficult to calculate their incidence. Any upheaval that causes damage in the tissues or reduces blood flow in the penis can cause this. The occurrence rises with age: around 5% of the men of 40 years of age and about 20% of the men of 65 years of age experience impotency. But erectile dysfunction is not necessarily an unavoidable part of the aging process.

To enjoy a healthy sexual life again, get the necessary treatment. Follow the treatment plan that your doctor suggests. Reduce your alcohol intake and quit smoking. You must deal with tension, stress and anxiety and not let these affect your health. Be cheerful and communicate more with your partner.

Prostate Problems

Prostatitis is an inflammation of the prostate. Acute prostatitis can be caused by diseases of sexual transmission. Often they exhibit many symptoms and even fever. Chronic prostatitis usually is based in the great prostates in people of more than 50 years with benign prostate hypertrophy. The symptoms happen generally unnoticed. They are normal changes that the prostate may undergo in men as they age. It can cause symptoms of irritation of the bladder, like urgency to tinkle, minor forces in the urine spurt, or to tinkle repeated times. Prostate cancer is also very common in men. Studies corroborate the presence of the same in elderly men by means of a biopsy of prostate. In the majority of the men it evolves gradually and affects their quality of life. In a few cases the cancer is aggressive.

Prostate problems can be treated by medical, minimally invasive, surgical as well as alternative treatments. The treatments usually are effective. A healthy lifestyle comprising of physical activity and good nutrition also guarantees prevention of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. Eat whole, fresh and organic foods and avoid refined food items, junk food, alcohol and caffeine. Drink as much water as you can.

Cholesterol Problems

The Hypercholesterolemia (increased cholesterol in the blood) is the presence of elevated levels of cholesterol in the blood. It is a metabolic misalignment that can be secondary to many diseases and can contribute to many forms of disease, especially cardiovascular. It is closely tied to the terms ‘hyperlipidemia’ (elevated lipid levels) and ‘hyperlipoproteinemia’ (elevated lipoprotein levels). The high cholesterol does not lead immediately to the specific symptoms. Hypercholesterolemia, aggravated by many years, can be expressed in a number of cardiovascular diseases: disease of the coronary artery (angina of chest, attacks of the heart), movement and ischemic accident and peripheral vascular disease.

Your cholesterol problems can be solved if you can get rid of accumulated toxins from your body. Exercise and indulge in regular physical activity thereby giving up on the sedentary lifestyle. The more you sweat the more toxins you lose and the healthier you get. Also follow a proper dietary plan that should include a lot of green vegetables, whole grains and antioxidant-rich foods.

About the Author: If you would like to sign up for a Personal Trainer in Bondi or to register for a free Boot Camp consultation, visit Boot Camps Sydney.

Source: www.isnare.com
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The Beneficial Side of Desserts

The Beneficial Side of Desserts

The Beneficial Side of Desserts
By Stephen G John

Eating dessert is done more for cultural reasons rather than as a necessary part of a meal. It signifies completion of a meal and gives you a sense of satisfaction. But a good dessert shouldn't only be intended to make you feel good - it should be beneficial as well.

Here are some benefits of having a good dessert:

1. It helps facilitate digestion.
2. It provides additional nutrients to your diet.
3. The added vitamins work to increase your resistance to infections.
4. The "feel good" factor of a good dessert helps to reduce stress.
5. It helps to reduce the bad cholesterol levels while increasing the good cholesterol in your body.

How to Prepare a Healthy Dessert

It's quite easy to prepare a healthy dessert. You only need to include nutritious ingredients that are low in fat to produce one. Here are some ways to prepare a dessert that's not only tasty but healthy as well:

1. Include fruits

Fruits are loaded with vitamins, minerals and fiber that your body needs for strength, vitality and resistance to sicknesses. You should include them in your dessert recipe. Apples, bananas, papayas and fresh berries are some fruits that you must consider to make a flavorful, nourishing dessert.

2. Avoid using ingredients that are high in fat.

Fat is one of the greatest causes of obesity and a lot of degenerative diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure and heart ailment. You should avoid using it as an ingredient in making dessert.

You can do it by substituting heavy cream with low-fat cream or low-fat cottage cheese.

3. Add chocolate to your ingredients.

Chocolate contains antioxidants that work to strengthen your immune system. It also contains substances that help to improve your mood. You may also use unsweetened cocoa or chocolate protein powder as healthy substitutes for chocolate.

4. Use yoghurt in your dessert.

Yoghurt is a healthy ingredient because it helps your body absorb calcium and vitamin B more efficiently. It also works to boost the immune system and improves digestion. Another beneficial attribute of yoghurt is its ability to lower bad cholesterol levels in the body.

5. Use soymilk.

If you are fond of making desserts that contain milk such as smoothies and shakes, use soy milk. Soymilk contains flavonoids that help to keep your blood vessels healthy. This will lead to normal blood pressure and protection from heart problems.

If you love to eat desserts as a regular part of your meals, you should make it nutritious so that it can give you an added benefit aside from feeling good and satisfied.

Feel free to see delicious dessert recipes at Foodplus delicious desserts section.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Stephen_G_John/1361639
http://EzineArticles.com/?The-Beneficial-Side-of-Desserts&id=8513144


Cancer Treatments and Side-Effects: Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy

Cancer Treatments and Side-Effects: Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy

Cancer Treatments and Side-Effects: Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy
By Areg Boyamyan

So you've been told your cancer will be treated with chemotherapy. What does that mean exactly? Are the side-effects as bad as you've heard? How effective is it? Why not another type of treatment? What about immunotherapy? These are important questions you should ask your doctor, but, to give you a head-start, here is some basic information on these two common types of cancer treatment: Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy.

Chemotherapy

The use of drugs or medicines to treat cancer is chemotherapy. Unlike surgery or radiation therapy treatments where cancer is removed, killed, or damaged in a particular area, chemo works throughout the whole body and can be used to kill cancer cells that have metastasized to other parts of the body. Chemotherapy may be used to cure cancer, control cancer, or for palliation.

Common side-effects resulting from chemotherapy include fatigue, hair loss, easy bruising and bleeding, anemia, infection, appetite changes, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, problems of the mouth, tongue, and throat (such as pain swallowing and sores), nail and skin changes, bladder and urine changes, kidney problems, weight changes, mood changes, fertility problems, and changes in sexual function and libido. It is important to remember that the fact that all these side-effects exists does not mean that you will experience them. You may only have a few or potentially none at all. Chemotherapy treatment affects each person differently.

Immunotherapy

Using the body's immune system to fight cancer is referred to as immunotherapy. This can be done in one of two ways:

  1. By stimulating your immune system to attack cancer cells or generally work harder.
  2. By giving you immune system components, like man-made proteins.

Immunotherapy works better for certain types of cancer over others. It is sometimes used as the only treatment and other times in conjunction with other treatments. Immunotherapy may be given intravenously (IV), orally, topically, or intravesically (directly into the bladder). The main forms of immunotherapy being used to treat cancer right now are:

  1. Monoclonal antibodies - man-made proteins that can be designed to attack specific parts of cancer cells.
  2. Immune checkpoint inhibitors - drugs that help the immune system recognize and attack cancer cells.
  3. Cancer vaccines - substances introduced into the body to initiate an immune response.
  4. Non-specific immunotherapies - These generally boost the immune system, which can help it attack cancer cells.

The side-effects you may experience with immunotherapy treatment depend on the type of immunotherapy you receive, but, generally, the possible side-effects include skin reactions at the needle site, flu-like symptoms (fever, chills, weakness, nausea or vomiting, dizziness, fatigue, joint or muscle aches, breathing trouble, headache, high or low blood pressure), weight gain from retaining fluid, swelling, sinus congestion, heart palpitations, and risk of infection.

Knowledge is Power

The likelihood that you will develop cancer is dependent on a variety of factors. Your lifestyle is one. The healthier you are, the stronger your cancer prevention. Another factor is genetics. Do you know if you have a genetic predisposition that increases your chances for developing certain cancers? Getting this information can help you make the right choices to optimize your cancer prevention lifestyle and reveal23 can make it happen! Request your reveal23 kit today: http://reveal23.com/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Areg_Boyamyan/2348305
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A Different Picture Of Heart Disease

A Different Picture Of Heart Disease

A Different Picture Of Heart Disease

In Feb 2006, researchers reported that many women suffer from a fundamentally different heart disease from men and is easily missed from standard tests. Moreover, women do not seek treatment as early as men, and women's hearts are smaller and their blood vessels are more easily damaged. Another possible reason is that the disease could manifest itself differently. As a result, women are less likely to survive heart attacks than men. Many women are still unaware that heart disease and stroke have emerged as the top killers of women worldwide.

The researchers found that for some women, instead of developing obvious blockages in the arteries supplying blood to the heart, plaque are accumulated more evenly inside the major arteries and in smaller blood vessels. In other cases, their arteries fail to expand properly or go into spasm, often at times of physical or emotional stress. These abnormalities are very common for younger women and these can be dangerous because they could trigger life-threatening heart attacks.

Instead of the classic crushing chest pain, sweating and shortness of breath, they often complain of vague symptoms such as fatigue, an upset in stomach, or pain in the jaw or shoulders. This certainly explain why some women suddenly have heart attacks even though their arteries look clear and in some cases, the doctors even send them home without treatment or refer them to psychiatrists. Even if they do get medical treatment, these women may not benefit from the standard drugs or therapies such as bypass surgery and angioplasty to reopen the clogged arteries. In many cases, these women whose arteries looked clear in normal tests have a significantly higher risk of having a heart attack or dying within four or five years. The abnormalities could be due to the fact that hormonal or genetic differences change how their arteries react. In America, there are as many as three million women may suffer from these conditions.

Despite the new findings, many women do have the same kind of heart disease as men, and they do benefit from the same preventative measures and treatments that help men: a healthy diet and weight; regular exercise; and a lower blood pressure and cholesterol level. It is still unclear how best doctors can tackle such conditions, but the new findings do provide important understanding of a major health problem, and it also alerts both women and their doctors about the alternative manifestations of the disease.

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Anti-Aging Foods

Anti-Aging Foods

Anti-Aging Foods
By Andy Gibson

How old are you? No, we don't mean how many birthdays have you celebrated. That's your chronological age. But how good is the pacing of your heart, the density of your bones, the agility of your mind? Their status will tell us your biological age. Some people are chronologically 40, but biologically 60, while others are chronologically 60, but biologically 40.

It's your biological age that matters. When you're biologically fit, you can throw away the calendar, for your motor is humming well and there's life in your years!

Biological age, says Dr. James Fries, professor of medicine at Stanford University, is a measure of how much "organ reserve" one possesses. Organ reserve is defined as the amount of functional ability one has available in response to a stressor in the form of an illness, accident or major life trauma. As we grow older, we generally lose organ reserve. Our immune, endocrine, and nervous systems are altered. Not only are we at greater risk of contracting infectious diseases, but we are also more susceptible to auto-immune diseases such as arthritis.

In the 1950s, Dr. Denham Harmon, from the University Of Nebraska School Of Medicine, proposed that many losses of function associated with aging are due to what he termed "free-radical damage." Free radicals are highly reactive chemical substances produced in the body, not only as a consequence of exposure to pollution, drugs, and chemicals but also as a result of natural metabolic activities. Harmon proposed that accelerated free-radical reactions may act as molecular time bombs that destroy the body's cells and result in the loss of organ reserve.

Research indicates that increased free-radical damage is associated with diseases that cause death in the elderly, including coronary heart disease and heart attack, certain forms of cancer and adult-onset diabetes.

Fortunately, our bodies are equipped with a mechanism - the antioxidant defense system - that helps protect against free-radical damage. Antioxidants are specific substances found in all cells that defuse free radicals before they have a chance to do serious damage to the body. They include vitamin E, beta carotene, vitamin C, and a variety of essential nutritional minerals, such as zinc, copper, and selenium.

Vitamin E is one of the superheroes when it comes to battling free radicals. Because it is a fat-soluble vitamin, it is attracted to cell membranes which have large amounts of fatty acids. Vitamin E prevents the oxidation of these fats by itself oxidizing and absorbing the free radicals.

Food sources of this vitamin include nuts, wheat germ, and sunflower seeds.

Vitamin C: Unlike Vitamin E, which works from the outside of cells, C does its antioxidizing job inside the cell, in its fluid (C is a water-soluble vitamin).

Food sources include: citrus fruits, amla (Indian gooseberry), strawberries, guavas and tomatoes.

Beta-carotene: Richly found in yellow-orange fruits and vegetables like mangoes, papayas, cantaloupes and carrots, beta-carotene converts to Vitamin A in the body. It is believed to be particularly effective against a highly toxic free radical called singlet oxygen.

Selenium: This trace mineral fights free radicals indirectly - by producing an enzyme which turns peroxides into harmless water. Best food sources are grains, fish, cabbage, celery and cucumber.

Zinc: another trace mineral, but this one works its effect in two ways: One, it acts as an antioxidant on its own; two, it forms part of an enzyme which protects cells against free radicals.

Good natural sources are liver, beef and nuts.

EAT RIGHT - STAY WELL!

Some of the major health-slackers and age-speeders (heart disease, osteoporosis) are often the result of faulty eating. In many cases you can reduce your disease risks as soon as you adopt good nutrition habits - even if you begin at 60.

REDUCE FATS: A high intake of fats is associated with obesity which, in turn, is connected with the onset of diseases like high blood pressure heart ailments, gall bladder problems, adult-onset diabetes and even certain forms of cancer.

You can safely reduce fats to 20 per cent of daily calories - 30 per cent is the outer limit. Of the three types of fats, saturated fats (from animal products and from vegetable sources like palm and coconut oils) are associated with the build-up of cholesterol. Monounsaturated fats (from ground nuts oil, nuts such as almond, cashews, peanuts, etc.), and polyunsaturated fats (from safflower oil sunflower oil, etc.) appear to have a cholesterol-lowering effect.

Animal fats also carry the added danger of cholesterol. One egg yolk, for instance, contains about 240 mg, which is more than most of us should consume in a whole day.

On the other hand, all fats are breeding grounds for free radicals. And the unsaturated fats are more likely to react with oxygen when cooked and form free radicals than the saturated fats. So, the bottomline is: limit all fat consumption. Try the following food swaps:

  • Substitute skim milk for whole.
  • Substitute egg whites for yolks, in omelets and other dishes.
  • If you can't stomach the idea of being a pure vegetarian, substitute skinless chicken and fish for fat-marbled red meats, sausages and cold cuts.

Also, steam, bake or eat foods raw whenever you can. If you must fry, opt for stir-frying with minimal oil in a non-stick skillet, instead of deep frying.

BONE UP ON CALCIUM:

How well you "stand up" to aging is very largely a matter of how adequate your intake of calcium has been. If you've not been getting enough, bone loss can begin in the mid-30's, in women even as early as puberty. The result: osteoporosis, that brittle bone disease that hits elderly people.

Many people don't get enough calcium in their diet (especially hard-core vegetarians who don't even take milk/dairy products). Your daily requirement: 800-1000mg. Good calcium sources are: milk and milk products; fish like sardines (where you can chew on those tiny, edible, calcium-rich bones); green leafy vegetables. But the calcium from plant sources is not as well absorbed as that from animal sources.

Also, unfortunately, aging itself blunts calcium absorption. Certain foods like coffee, tea, colas and chocolates (all of which contain caffeine) as well as tobacco, if taken at the same time as calcium, can inhibit its absorption. So do phosphorus-rich drinks like sodas.

Remember, also, that your body requires Vitamin D for the intestinal absorption of calcium. If your diet is deficient in this vitamin, you can get some of your needs from sunlight. Food sources include: liver, egg yolk, milk, butter.

WHAT ELSE...

In the run-up to a healthy old age, there are a few other things you must do:

  1. Limit salt intake to about one teaspoon a day. Excess salt consumption carries the risk of high blood pressure and its potentially fatal consequences: heart disease, stroke, kidney disease.
  2. Avoid heavy alcohol consumption. It is associated with liver damage and increased cancer risk.
  3. Give up smoking. It can cause a whole range of illness, from chronic respiratory ailments like emphysema to cancers of the lung, mouth and esophagus.

My firm belief is: "Finding a cause leads the way to find a cure". So, it is basically important to understand everything from its deepest core. And the best way to do so is: Keep on reading to develop and deepen your understanding on health and wellness at GrowTaller4IdiotsDS.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Andy_Gibson/2325820
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Type 2 Diabetes - Link Between Nonalcoholic Liver Disease and Peripheral Vascular Conditions

Type 2 Diabetes - Link Between Nonalcoholic Liver Disease and Peripheral Vascular Conditions

Type 2 Diabetes - Link Between Nonalcoholic Liver Disease and Peripheral Vascular Conditions
By Beverleigh H Piepers

Type 2 diabetes is a known risk factor for both nonalcoholic liver disease and peripheral vascular conditions. Scientists at Qingdao University and other research facilities in China have found a link between both conditions.

In July of 2017, the Internal Medicine Journal reported on a study of two thousand six hundred and forty-six participants who had been previously diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. They were all at least 40 years of age. Those who had nonalcoholic fatty liver disease were at a high risk for peripheral vascular conditions. A total of 12.8 percent of the participants with the liver condition also had vascular conditions, compared with 7.8 percent of the participants without liver disease. When all other factors were taken into account, the difference was shown to be slightly significant. C-reactive protein, an indicator of inflammation, and measurements of defective metabolism were also higher in those with peripheral artery disease (PAD).

From the above information, the researchers concluded nonalcoholic fatty liver disease was partly to blame. Metabolic risk factors and inflammation were other risk factors. The complications of Type 2 diabetes appear to be related to the other risk factors. Keeping blood sugar levels and body weight under control is important to every body system. The early stages of Type 2 diabetes are not painful but prevention of the complications can prevent the pain of...

  • peripheral artery disease,
  • heart attacks, and
  • strokes.

Peripheral vascular conditions frequently go undiagnosed. If ignored these conditions can lead to gangrene and amputation.

  • gangrene develops from poor circulation.
  • when the limbs do not get sufficient oxygen and nutrients, tissue can die.
  • dead tissue can become infected.
  • if antibiotics do not resolve the infection, then amputation becomes the next step in treatment.

Peripheral vascular conditions are the most common reasons for amputation.

If tingling and numbness occur in your hands or feet, then be sure to have them checked out, diagnosed and treated. Peripheral vascular conditions can be treated with medication and with regular walking (feet). Ways of preventing or treating peripheral artery disease...

  • keeping your blood sugar below 100 mg/dL (5.5 mmol/L) fasting,
  • not smoking,
  • taking blood pressure medication when it is indicated by your doctor,
  • taking cholesterol-lowering medication regularly when prescribed,
  • taking medications to improve blood circulation - Plavix (clopidogrel) or daily aspirin prescribed to prevent blood clots, Trental, Pentoxil (pentoxifylline) prescribed to improve blood circulation, Pletal (cidistoprel) prescribed to improve circulation.
  • surgery to replace damaged blood vessels with artificially-made tubes.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

For nearly 25 years, Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body. Go to http://DrugFreeType2Diabetes.com to learn about some of those secrets.

The answer isn't in the endless volumes of available information but in yourself.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Beverleigh_H_Piepers/123142
http://EzineArticles.com/?Type-2-Diabetes---Link-Between-Nonalcoholic-Liver-Disease-and-Peripheral-Vascular-Conditions&id=9755403


Type 2 Diabetes - Preventing Critical Limb Ischemia in Diabetics

Type 2 Diabetes - Preventing Critical Limb Ischemia in Diabetics

Type 2 Diabetes - Preventing Critical Limb Ischemia in Diabetics
By Beverleigh H Piepers

Anyone who has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes is at risk for developing what is known as critical limb ischemia, a condition in which arteries supplying blood to the limbs form plaques inside their walls. When this happens not enough oxygen can reach the cells, and the cells develop ischemia, which can lead to cell death. Various medical people consider it an advanced form of peripheral artery disease (PAD), while others consider it a separate condition.

With enough dead cells in the limbs, the limbs are then subject to infection. The immune system is unable to fight infections effectively if blood flow is sluggish. Critical limb ischemia is not always diagnosed until serious problems such as gangrene, develop. Scientists at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Hubei, China, have found a molecule that could be used to diagnose critical limb ischemia before it progresses to a critical level. Their work was reported in September of 2017 by the journal Scientific Reports.

A molecule called Siglec-5 was found in cases where Type 2 diabetics had been diagnosed with ischemia. The molecule was seen in samples of plaque taken from the limbs of those with ischemia but not in the arteries of diabetic patients without plaque. The investigators concluded Siglec-5 levels could be used for the prevention of or treatment planning in critical limb ischemia.

In the United States, there are about 500 to 1000 cases of chronic limb ischemia diagnosed for every million people every year, with approximately 8 to 10 million cases existing at any one time. Worldwide statistics are unavailable.

The following can raise the risk of critical limb ischemia...

  • being aged over 60 or post menopausal,
  • being a smoker,
  • having Type 2 diabetes,
  • being overweight or obese,
  • leading a sedentary lifestyle,
  • having high cholesterol levels,
  • having high blood pressure readings,
  • a family history of blood vessel disease.

Anyone diagnosed with critical limb ischemia can have foot pain at rest. Muscle pain described as burning or cramping may be felt in the muscles and is relieved at rest. In more severe cases there can be ulceration or gangrene. The condition is diagnosed with a technique known as pulse volume recording or by ultrasound, a technique used to show blood flow, or lack thereof, throughout the legs and feet.

In mild cases, treatment can consist of...

  • controlling blood sugar levels,
  • taking medications to lower cholesterol levels,
  • reducing high blood pressure,
  • losing weight, and by
  • quitting smoking.

In other cases, angioplasty can be used. A tube with a small balloon may be inserted into the affected arteries. The balloon is inflated to aid in eliminating the plaque.

Surgery is another option. Jammed vessels may be replaced with artificial arteries.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

For nearly 25 years, Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body. Go to http://DrugFreeType2Diabetes.com to learn about some of those secrets.

The answer isn't in the endless volumes of available information but in yourself.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Beverleigh_H_Piepers/123142
http://EzineArticles.com/?Type-2-Diabetes---Preventing-Critical-Limb-Ischemia-in-Diabetics&id=9791826


Is Eating Margarine Really Bad For You?

Is Eating Margarine Really Bad For You?

Submitted by: Sue Batty

In day-to-day life we use spreads a lot. They’re an essential part of our everyday eating habits; being melted on toast at breakfast time, spread on our lunchtime sandwiches and even mixed into the occasional indulgent cake and cookies. So it’s important that we make sure that the spread we’re putting in to our bodies so often is as good for us as possible.

We believe that margarine is a healthy choice of spread to make, and this is why:

Healthy margarine is made from plant oils – such as canola, soy, sunflower and many others. These natural oils contain a healthy dollop of the good fats we need to make sure we include in our diets. The word ‘fat’ can often have bad connotations, but not all fats make you gain weight or clog up your arteries. Good Housekeeping – that bastion of all things wholesome says:

“Everyone needs some fat in their diet – as a source of energy, to keep your skin and hair healthy, to make certain hormones, and to help your body absorb certain vitamins (A, D, E and K)."

So we need to make sure we’re taking in the right fats, but what are the wrong fats?

Bad fats are trans fats and saturated fats, these have been linked to heart disease, weight gain and other health problems. Margarine has less saturated fats than butter and all good spreads and margarine brands contain only traces of trans fats, so it’s the perfect choice of spread to keep your heart ticking along happily (always check the label to be sure of the fat content).

As well as the basic ingredients of margarine being a nutritious part of your diet, we even add extra goodness into it for good measure, in the form of vitamin A and vitamin D to make sure your hair, skin, bones and teeth stay strong and well. These have been added to the mix since 1925 and make sure that you and your family are able to get enough of the good stuff your bodies need.

There are loads of recipes that you can try out using margarine and it’s so simple that you can whip up a batch at home in your kitchen just by following five simple steps.

There was a Lifecycle Assessment study done on butter and margarine which analyzed the environmental impact of margarine and butter products sold in key European markets (Germany, France and the UK) throughout the entire product life cycle. In all three countries, margarine products were proven to be more environmentally favourable than butter products:

1. Margarine has less than one third the carbon footprint of butter.

2. Margarine requires about half the land occupation of butter.

3. Margarine products require 2% to 50% less energy use than butter products.

With healthy margarines being made with plant oils as one of its main ingredients so not only is it good for you, it’s good for the environment too.

So there you have it, with all of it’s good fats and vitamins margarine is great to include as part of a healthy, balanced diet.

About the Author: Sue Batty loves margarine and what she doesn’t know about cooking isn’t worth knowing! With chef, teacher, home economist and many more titles to her name, Sue is the woman in the know about all things culinary. She’s always used margarine in her cooking since she began cooking at an early age. For more info on margarine and your health, visit http://www.enjoymargarineeveryday.com/margarine-for-your-health

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Resistance Training Workout Routines

Resistance Training Workout Routines

Submitted by: Dr. Al Parker

What Is Resistance Training?

Resistance training involves activities that use weights, machines, resistance bands or even body weight to work your muscles properly. It is also known as strength training. This can be extremely helpful in achieving a healthier body. This kind of training we usually associate with athletes who have to build up their bodies to perform better. Most people would think that when resistance training is done, the body will grow bigger. Actually it does not have to. Resistance training is simply about increasing the strength of the body, not always it's size. Although we traditionally think that strength training traditionally for athletes, it can be use by anyone successfully if done correctly. Reistance training basically strengthens the muscles, and leans the bodies fat stores. It can be used by any age group to acheive specific results.

How Does Resistance Training Work?

A resistance training program will include the use of various exercise equipment and machines like the bench press, dumbbell or barbell. However, the easiest and most convienent way to train with resistance for most of us with busy lives is by using resistance bands at home. When the equipment is used, the muscles of the body will be pitted against the resistance. The cells of the body will then adapt to the extra resistance. This will then result to enlarge and increase the strength of each muscle cell to help in the muscle perform contractions more efficiently. Before doing any resistance training, it is ,of course, best to consult with a doctor. This goes especially for people who have medical conditions such as heart disease, lung disease diabetes, kidney or liver disease. You should know the proper tools and proper exercises for the needs of your body. Of course, that's whatwww.plantoberipped.com is here for. We can give you a personalized assessment of what type of resistance training program is right for you.

One of the best things about resistance training is that it can be done with little to no expensive equipement and does not require a large amount of space. Doing push-ups is one good example. You can do it just about anywhere where there is enough space for you to move. This time it is your own body weight that will be pitted against the muscles. So those who are a bit constrained in the budget can still do resistance trainings.

What Are the Benefits of Resistance Training?

1. Increase Bone Mineral Density-

Bones are constantly remodeling, meaning the tissues break down at the same time they build up. The peak of remodeling takes place during puberty. However, as a person ages, our bone mineral density decreases as the remodeling is not as active anymore. This is especially a problem to post-menopausal women and the elderly, but does begin to happen in the early thirties. Bone mineral density is usually supported by the hormones and stress placed on the bones. To address the problem of not having the hormones and less stress, and to maintain the bone mineral density, physical activity is the next best option. Resistance training is one physical activity that can put enough stress on the bones to stimulate remodeling and increase bone density.

2. Increase Strength-

In addition to increase in bone density and strength, muscles will grow stronger and become more developed as you progress.

3. Increase the Range of Activities-

When your body is strong enough to carry some considerable weight, then you will also be capable of doing more strenuous activities. An increase in exercise lifts the mood and you will be more interested in life and a more active lifestyle. This will really create a snowball effect on your life and activities.

4. Reduce the Body Fat-

Using and increasing the muscle mass (even a little bit) will increase the energy that is required by your body, even at rest. This also increases the energy needed by your body at during activities. The more muscle, the more energy is needed to be broken down to supply you body to function properly. This translates to more fat calories and fat being burned each minute. Thus with the decrease in body fat, you can expect the tone of the body to improve and you will become leaner....and did I mention sexy??

5. Improve State of the Elders-

For the elderly undergoing a resistance training program will help improve their health and decrease the risks brought about by the age. They can be more independent, without needing to rely on other people for doing simple things. Being able to do so will also decrease the risk of injuries in the elders

6. Improve Heart Condition-

Regular resistance training can result in a lowered heart rate and lowered blood pressure, especially after exercise. Thus, the risk of heart diseases is reduced.

This kind of training however must be properly done. It requires commitment and consistency. It will have to be done in a regular basis.

This is the real challenge when it comes to exercise and improving your health is consistency It's not hard to exercise for 30 minutes, but its difficult to consistently do this 5 days a week for 3 or 4 months. That is why you will need comprehensive plans like www.super-fit.com provides. What is super-fit.com you ask? Well, it's not yet released, but it is a website that will automate all of your boring fitness tasks. Such as finding new and exciting workouts (even with video download), calculating your calories, and finding tasty recipes.

The best part about this site is that they don't just give you a list of exercises to do and send you on your way. They provide every aspect of help that is required to get results. Workouts, nutrition, motivation, recipes, peer chatting and forums, and even access to expert advice. The key here is to simply take your time. Do things one step at a time correctly. As your body condition improves, then move on to more challenging tasks. The strength of the body and your health are very easy to improve with the right tools. Don't work hard, work smart!

About the Author: Dr. Parker is a surgical resident with a special interest in nutrition, fitness and the improvement of overall health. He has helped many people, patients and non-patients, acheive their fitness goals using little to no equipment and the most time effiecient workout routines possible. If you would like more information on his fitness program, go to: http://www.plantoberipped.com

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