Diabetes

To Supplement or Not to Supplement

To Supplement or Not to Supplement

Submitted by: Glenn Antoine

It is a known fact that vitamins, minerals and micro-nutrients are essential to good health. If this world were perfect we would get all these nutrients from the food we eat on a daily basis. However, because this does not always happen, there are some convincing reasons to consider taking vitamin, mineral or micro-nutrient supplements.

Vitamins can help us overcome our lifestyle problems. On the whole, we are not very responsible when it comes to healthy habits. Many people play with their lives by smoking, drinking alcohol to excess, not getting adequate exercise or sleep, making poor choices in foods, and many other activities that lead to poor health. By taking vitamins every day, some of these negative effects may be counteracted.

Women in particular have special vitamin needs related both to osteoporosis and pregnancy issues. Although men can also have osteoporosis, it tends to attack women more and cause them greater suffering. By supplementing with calcium on a daily basis, much of the risk for osteoporosis can be offset and some of the latest research is showing that vitamin D plays a significant role in the prevention of osteoporosis. For women who are pregnant or considering having children, folic acid is an essential supplement. This B vitamin can prevent birth defects such as Spina Bifida in newborn babies. Lastly for pre-menopausal women there is overwhelming research showing that a large percentage of the population is iron deficient.

Men, too, have issues that can be fought through proper vitamin intake. Cardiovascular problems are thought to be reduced by taking vitamin E supplements. They are believed to play an important role in keeping the blood pressure and cholesterol levels low in most males aged forty and over. Keeping the arteries clean is an important factor in preventing heart attacks and vitamin E has been shown in research studies to accomplish this task.

Dieters have special supplementation needs of their own. Many young girls diet on a regular basis and consume far too few calories to accommodate their vitamin needs. While the wisdom of going on particular weight loss diets is a topic for another discussion, anyone on such a diet should look to vitamin supplements to avoid malnutrition and other maladies. Inadequate nutrition can cause a person to be vulnerable to various ailments and a weakened immune system.

Another great reason to consider vitamin supplementation is the potential cancer prevention some vitamins are believed to provide. Research has suggested that vitamin E and vitamin A prevent skin cancer. Many studies in recent years have found that other types of cancers may be similarly prevented by taking certain vitamins.

While there is never a fail proof plan when it comes to vitamin supplements, the evidence does suggest that risk may be reduced and conditions may be improved through supplementation. Due to all of the possible benefits, supplementation is definitely worth considering. Lastly, while I have not even scratched the surface of the benefits and the various nutrients that we need to optimize our body’s ability to rebuild and repair itself on a daily basis please take the time to ensure that you are getting these vital nutrients on a daily basis for a long healthy life.

References:

1) The American Society for Nutritional Sciences Website - 813S

2) PubMed Website Articles: Zinc Supplementation artid=131177

3) American Heart Association Website: Antioxidants - identifier=2062

4) American Heart Association Website: Homocysteine - identifier=442

About the Author: Glenn has combined his passion for health and fitness with a great business model that allows him opportunities that would have otherwise not been possible. For more information visit: http://www.aginghealthier.com/ or http://www.opportunityofyourlife.com/

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Cooking Healthy With Quinoa - This Super Food Belongs in Your Diet

Cooking Healthy With Quinoa - This Super Food Belongs in Your Diet

Submitted by: Susanne Myers

One thing that most of us have in common is the desire to feed our kids, and ourselves, nutritious food. But, when faced with the array of choices, it gets confusing. What's good, what's bad... it's not easy to distinguish the difference sometimes.

Even though quinoa has been around for thousands of years, it hasn't hit America's grocery shelves until recently. Over the last few years, quinoa has exploded in cookbooks, cooking shows, and the internet. This 'super-food' is becoming quite popular in many circles; including vegetarian, vegan, weight loss, gluten-free, and fitness diets.

Quinoa is a seed, a relative of beets, spinach, and Swiss chard. Because it is not a grass or grain, quinoa is considered the perfect food for those with grain, like wheat, sensitivities. The awareness of gluten-free diets may have likely brought quinoa into the limelight. However, quinoa is proving to fit into many diets for a wide range of reasons. Let's take a look at a few benefits that quinoa offers us all:

Protein: Not all foods considered high in protein contain all the essential amino acids in proper proportions for maximum effectiveness in the body, but quinoa does. Quinoa is a complete protein, meaning it contains all essential amino acids in perfect proportions. In fact, quinoa has the same protein quality as milk. For a vegan, or a vegetarian who doesn't drink milk, quinoa is the perfect replacement food. Mix in some black beans in a simple soup or casserole, and you have the ultimate protein-rich super-food.

Minerals: The most concentrated amounts of minerals in quinoa are manganese, magnesium, and phosphorus. With just one serving of quinoa, you will have more than half the RDA of manganese alone, neutralizing those damaging free radicals that are constantly attacking our organs. Along with manganese, quinoa contains high concentrates of magnesium and phosphorous which are both essential minerals aiding in bone health, heart and cardiovascular health, as well as nerve and brain health. Quinoa completes the mineral wheel with ample supplies of calcium, iron, potassium, zinc, copper, and selenium, all vital to our health and well-being.

Vitamins: The highest concentrated vitamin in quinoa is folate. Folate is a B vitamin that is essential for healthy red blood cell development as well as healthy tissue and organ development, most notably during a child's early years. Folate is also believed to fight the destructive cell developments of cancer. Other vitamins that can be found in a good supply in quinoa are vitamin E, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin B6, all essential in the growth, repair, and functioning of vital organs, blood, and tissue.

Dietary Fiber: You probably hear a lot about dietary fiber in advertisements aimed at curing constipation. But, the fact is, dietary fiber is crucial for all of our body functions. With a whopping 21% RDA in one serving of quinoa, eating a regular diet including this super-food makes sense. Why? Not only does fiber aid the digestive system, it also is known to lower blood cholesterol levels. Studies also show that increasing fiber in your diet will help reduce blood pressure which promotes heart health. A good diet rich in fiber helps control blood sugar levels by slowing the absorption of sugars. Along with these benefits, high-fiber diets also may help with weight loss, due to the fact that foods that are high in fiber and low in calories, like quinoa, fill you up without added calories.

It appears that if you had to choose one food to survive on, quinoa may be your best bet. This super-food contains just about everything a body needs - fiber, vitamins, minerals, healthy fat, carbohydrates, and protein. Add to that the fact that quinoa is low in calories, has zero cholesterol, zero sugars, and is low in sodium, and you've got the perfect food to add to your family's healthy diet.

How do you get more quinoa into your diet? You can do much more than substituting quinoa in dishes that call for rice or pasta. Rather, start by remembering that quinoa is a protein. With that in mind, think about quinoa like you do black beans, another vegetarian source of protein. Replace meat meals with quinoa meals on a regular basis to enjoy all the benefits of this super food. Go ahead and clear a spot in your pantry, because once you cook with quinoa, you'll be stocking up.

About the Author: Susanne Myers wants to help you learn what it takes to eat right and stay fit, even with a hectic lifestyle and a tight budget. Find healthy recipes and tips for cooking with quinoa as well as other nutritious foods. And, visit us often at www.HillbillyHousewife.com for even more ideas and tips for living well.

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Facts About the Glycemic Index

Facts About the Glycemic Index

Submitted by: Adrian Joele

One of the important factors when trying to loose weight is to choose foods that keep your insulin levels fairly constant. This is especially true in regards to carbohydrates. When we eat foods that contain carbohydrates, the carbohydrates are digested in the stomach and intestines and are absorbed into the bloodstream, generally in the form of glucose.

When the carbohydrates we eat cause the blood sugar to quickly rise to high levels,excess insulin can cause to much sugar to be absorbed by the cells.This results in a condition of low blood sugar. The subsequent stress on the body stimulates the adrena glands to secrete hormones into the blood. Metabolism rises, glucose is manufactured from stores in the liver and the entire body may be activated in what is called “fight-or-flight response.”

The Glycemic Index (GI) is a classification of ranking of carbohydrates, based on their potential for raising blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates that are broken down slowly and cause only a moderate increase in blood sugar, have a low Glycemic Index. Some carbohydrates fall in between.

Specifically, the Glycemic Index measures how much a 50-gram portion of carbohydrates raises your blood sugar levels compared with a control. The control is either white bread or pure glucose. Glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream faster than any other carbohydrate and is thus given the value of 100. Other carbohydrates are given a number relative to glucose. Foods with low GI indices are released into the bloodstream at a slower rate than high GI foods.

All carbohydrates cause some temporary rise in your blood glucose level. This is called the glycemic response. A number of factors influence this response: the amount of food eaten, the digestion and absorption rate of food, including the physical structure, ripeness, particle seize, the degree of processing and preparation, the commercial brand, the nature of the starch, acidity and the characteristics of the diabetic patient. These factors naturally effect each food’s glycemic index position or rank.

The slower your body processes the food, the slower the insulin is released and the healthier the overall effect is on your body. In addition, differences exist in the glycemic indexes due to the choice of reference food, the timing of blood sampling or the computational method used to calculate the glycemic index.

When you desire to lose weight, you choose the foods that raise your blood sugar level slowly. You’ll discover that many of those foods are high in fiber and will keep you feeling fuller for a longer period of time. And if you have been on a diet, you will be thankful for this. The longer you feel satisfied, the less temptation you will have to eat something in between your meals that will spike your blood sugar.

As fructose is a slow moving sugar, almost all fruits, except bananas and dried fruits, have a low GI. Also, all vegetables that contain lots of fiber, except carrot and corn. Whole grains, starches and pasta have a higher GI. On top of the list are white bread, refined grains and some potatoes.

Following the latest research it appears that women experience cravings about 10 times during the day. The most common times for these cravings to appear are at 10 am and 4 pm. Interesting enough, these cravings correspond almost exactly to your low blood sugar levels as well as your low levels of serotonin. This is a chemical that drives women to start eating. And because the drive is so strong, it’s quite difficult to overcome.

Research performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Clinical Research Center uncovered this truth when it found a relationship between carbohydrates in the brain and weight loss. Dr. J. Wurtman, lead researcher of the study, demonstrated, that eating carbohydrates high on the GI raised the levels of serotonin in the brain.

The results also showed that women suffering from premenstrual syndrome eat to many carbohydrates and as a result gain weight. Others overeat when they are depressed, stressed or angry in an effort to balance these serotonin levels.

The objectives of diet management in diabetic patients are to reduce hyperglycemia, prevent hyperglycemic episodes, and reduce the risk of complications. For people with diabetes, the GI is a useful tool in planning to achieve and maintain glycemic control. High GI foods are absorbed quickly into the bloodstream, causing an escalation in blood glucose levels and increasing the possibility of hyperglycemia. The body compensates for the rise in blood sugar levels with an accompanying increase in insulin, which within a few hours can cause hypoglycemia. As a result, awareness of the glycemic indices of food assists in preventing large variances in blood glucose levels.

A low GI pre-event meal may be beneficial for athletes who respond negatively to carbohydrate-rich foods prior to exercise or who can’t consume carbohydrates during competition. Athletes are advised to consume carbohydrates of moderate to high GI during prolonged exercise to maximize performance, approximately 1 gram per minute of exercise. Following exercise, moderate to high GI foods enhance glycogen storage.

The fat content of food is one of the components that affect the GI. Like fiber, fat acts like a brake on the absorption process. Apart from this fact, fat just make food to taste better. Fats also play an important role of signaling your body to stop eating. This is vital to any weight-management program. The fat that you eat causes the body to release a hormone called cholecystokinin. This hormone is stored in the stomach until notified by the presence of fat and is responsible for informing the brain that you’re satisfied. It really is a marvellous thing and it means you don’t have to deprive yourself.

Another factor that influence the absorption rate of glucose is the protein content of the food. Protein seems to have the greatest effect when it comes down to satisfying those hunger pangs,especially for a long period of time and makes you feel fuller. Protein also helps you to stay alert. However, we have to be aware of the good and the bad protein. Always make sure you choose the lean protein in either beef, fish, chicken or plant-based protein.

Protein itself rates zero on the GI scale, this means you don’t have to be sparingly by adding it to your diet, only watch the calorie content. It slows down the rise in insulin that happens when you eat any form of carbohydrate. This means, if you add some protein to a food that ranks high on the GI scale, you will counteract the spiking effect in insulin rise. Another benefit of protein is, that it keeps you feeling full longer after you eat it.It is therefore a good idea to add some protein to your breakfast. And if you take a snack, make sure it contains some form of protein.

If you like fish, you are doing yourself a favor. Fish not only slows down the spiking in your insulin level, it also contains a rich source of Omega-3 fatty acids. Eat fish at least twice a week.

The Glycemic Index is an excellent tool. It provide you with a weight-management system that puts you in control of the foods you eat, how much you eat, the way you eat and when you like to eat. When you have a good variety of foods from which to choose, it makes it easier to stay with the system.

Try eating according to the Glycemic Index, you will be pleasantly surprised how easy it is to keep your weight under control and you’ll also find that your energy level will rise as a bonus!



About the Author: Adrian Joele became interested in nutrition and weight management while he was an associate with a nutritional supplement company. Since 2008 he wrote several articles about nutrition and weight loss and achieved expert status with Ezine http://Articles.com. He has been involved in nutrition and weight management for more than 12 years and he likes to share his knowledge. Get his free report on nutrition and weight loss plus tips for healthy living, by visiting: http://www.nutrobalance2.net

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How Cancer Starts

How Cancer Starts

Submitted by: Adrian Joele

The process by which normal cells become cancer cells has to do with genetic damage,

that is, the genes that we have inherited become damaged.

Our body is build-up of approximately 75 trillion cells and there are many different

types of cells of every part of our body. They continually replicate themselves.

Each cell has a set of genetic instructions in its center, called the DNA, which controls cell growth, development and replication.

The DNA is the vital component that gets damaged, the chemical blueprint in genes,

in the form of oxidation and the main cause of this is reactive oxygen ( technically

eferred to as reactive oxygen species ) , or the more common name: free radicals.

When DNA is damaged by free radicals, it can replicate a damaged cell.

When this cell replicates itself, it can become cancer.

Cancer is fundamentally an oxidative process and many types of cancers depend on the

conversion of particular molecules in the cells or carcinogenic chemicals to reactive

oxidised forms. The oxidation is largely caused by free radicals.

Oxidation in our body is the main cause of many forms of cancer, heart disease,

atheroclerosis, adult onset of diabetes, cataracts, lung – and liver disorders and

degenerative diseases of the brain.

Every day, the DNA in each cell in our body faces about 10,000 attacks from cell-

damaging forces known as free radicals, which are unstable oxygen molecules

that have lost an electron.

Ironically, both chemotherapy and radiotherapy that are used to treat cance

cause more oxidation.

In healthy living cells, reactive oxygen species are formed continuously during

the process of respiration in the cells.

Although the body is well equipped to repair genetic (DNA) damage, the repair processes

are usually less than 100 % efficient. Despite even extensive repair, oxidized DNA is

usually abundant in human tissues. Significantly, damaged DNA is particularly abundant

in tumors. The damage rate may be up to 10 modifications in each cell every day,

so it is apparent that damage accumulates with age.

The CSIRO Division of Human Nutrition believes that this increase in genetic damage

with age is due to the cumulative effects of free radical damage and dietary and

environmental chemicals that damage genes.

Our bodies have to face daily an over production of free radicals, caused by our polluted environment, stressful lifestyles and mal nutrition. Free radicals are naturally produced as your body turns fuel to energy, you can get them also from stress, smoking and radiation from the sun.

These volatile molecules cruise around your body, trying to stabilize themselves by stealing electrons from other molecules. When they succeed, they create still more free radicals, causing a sort of snowballing procession of damage.

Free radicals don't just occasionally pop up here and there. Up to 5% of the oxygen that each cell uses is converted into free radicals.

Ionising radiation is a potent generator of reactive oxygen species, while tobacco smoke has been found to increase the DNA damage by 35-50%. Other well-known causes include:

many polluting chemicals, including the hydrocarbons from petroleum, many pesticides, the chlorine in town water supplies; iron in access of the body's needs: amines and nutrates.

It is a surprise to see iron, as being one of the essential nutrients, on the 'bad list', yet the effects of excess iron are so significant, that the increased incidence of testicular cancer this century has been attributed to the increasing iron content of the Western diet.

Can our body defend itself against oxidative damage by excessive free radicals?

The answer is: yes! Our body is equipped with very powerful defenses against free radicals and this is largely through antioxidants, which are consumed in the diet or made within our body, and enzymes.

Balance is the key. If there are not enough antioxidants available to neutrolize the free radicals, oxidative stress develops.

The key antioxidants in the diet are the carotenoids, vitamin A ( which we consume or make from carotenoids), vitamin C, vitamin E and the trace minerals selenium and zinc.

The prominent enzymes that destroy free radicals are called: superoxide dismutase, glutathione (particular melatonin) and a host of other natural compounds, such as those occuring in grape seeds and skins (OPC's) and in the herb Ginkgo biloba.

Vitamin E has been extensively researched and there is strong evidence that it is beneficial at much higher intakes than the current RDA (Recommended Daily Allowances) of 15 IU ( International Units). Vitamin E is especially required to protect unsaturated fats against oxidation.

The least amount found to inhibit oxidation is 40 IU per day, with 60 IU/day the minimum to enhance immune response. The Optimal level is 450 IU/day. Up to 800 IU has been found to be beneficial.

The researchers suggest an intake of 135 - 150 IU/day.

To obtain this amount from food, we would need to consume daily almost a kilogram of almonds, or 150 grams of soya oil, or 55 grams of wheatgerm oil, each of which would be not only unpractical, but even a harmful quantity of food.

That's why it make sense to supplement our diet with high quality nutritional supplements (multiminerals and antioxidants) to ensure that the optimal levels are being met.



About the Author: Adrian Joele became interested in nutrition and weight management while he was an associate with a nutritional supplement company. Since 2008 he wrote several articles about nutrition and weight loss and achieved expert status with Ezine http://Articles.com. He has been involved in nutrition and weight management for more than 12 years and he likes to share his knowledge. Get his free report on nutrition and tips for healthy living, by visiting: http://www.nutrobalance2.net

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Early to Bed Adds Up to Good Health

by

Michelle Stewart

Now when I started this article the other day it was late---too late to chat about sleep deprivation. I just couldn't give advice when I was absolutely doing the opposite. I went to bed. In what seemed like a few minutes I was awakened. It was not the alarm but a phone call at 4 a.m. from a family member locked out of their house!! How ironic is that? I go to bed to get some sleep and end up awake and on the road to take a set of house keys to someone. It was probably sleep deprivation that caused her to forget the keys.

How much sleep do we need?

The amount of sleep varies, but the National Sleep Foundation recommends seven to nine hours for most adults. Now zzzs like anything else can vary based on individuals; some people can manage on six hours while others may need ten hours. Sleep needs are also affected by basal sleep, the amount of sleep your body regularly needs for optimum performance and sleep debt which is the accumulated amount of sleep lost due to poor sleep habits, illness or other factors affecting the quality of sleep.

Now you know I'm all about living the well-being lifestyle and cutting back on sleep is not a good thing. Sleeping hours are needed for the body to rest and rejuvenate. Affects of sleep deprivation can include: obesity, heart disease, diabetes, headaches, lack of attention, delayed motor skills.

Obesity: Research indicates that people who do not get enough sleep have a higher risk of becoming obese. The hormones that influence appetite are thrown out of balance; leptin controls hunger and it decreases, which makes you feel hungrier. Ghrelin the hormone produced by fat cells tells the body you need more fat calories, which creates cravings for foods that are high in fat and carbohydrates. This hormonal imbalance sets the stage for late-night binges on snacks that add up to a heavier weight.

People with poor sleep habits are tired and they often magnify the problem when they avoid or eliminate physical exercise. Regular exercise helps reduce stress, burns off calories and increases energy.

Heart Disease

Lack of sleep can increase stress hormones, which long-term are not good for the heart. Elevated stress hormones can damage blood vessels, leading to elevated or high blood pressure and heart disease.

Diabetes

This too can be a health challenge affected by lack of sleep. Diabetes has long been linked to obesity and being overweight. The fact that people may weigh more than recommended for their body type can be a predictor of the development of Type 2 Diabetes.

Headaches

This ailment falls into the discomfort that people identify as "feeling bad" when they are sleep deprived. There is also research indicating that lack of sleep can trigger headaches in predisposed individuals.

Cognition and Motor Skills

Less than the recommended amount of sleep affects cognitive processes--impaired attention, alertness, ability to concentrate, solve problems and use good judgment. Sleep deprivation can also impair motor skills and hand-eye coordination. In addition during the night, various sleep cycles play a role in "consolidating" memories in the mind. When you don't get enough sleep, it can affect your ability to remember what you learned and experienced during the day.

In our overscheduled days, we may consider a good night's sleep a luxury; that is a myth. Sleep is essential and in order to stay healthy we have to make it a priority.

Take Away: Sleep is essential for well-being. Turn off the television, mobile gadgets, personal computers and all those things that are too stimulating when it is time to turn out the lights.

Michelle J. Stewart is a Registered and Licensed Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator better known as the Nutrition Planner who has been leading the way to a healthier you for more than 25 years. Michelle is a Certified Wellness Coach whose motto is "EAT LESS MOVE MORE". She is a consultant for the food and beverage industry and offers expertise in corporate wellness, weight loss surgery, menu and product development. All opinions expressed are her own. Sign up for Michelle's Free Report 10 Weight Loss Tips for Life when you visit http://thenutritionplanner.com


10 Ways Tame Your Sweet Tooth

10 Ways Tame Your Sweet Tooth

Submitted by: Lorraine Matthews Antosiewicz

Consciously or not, the average American consumes 28 teaspoons of added sugars a day – that’s more than 90 pounds of sugar per year. The American Heart Association recommends women limit their added sugar to just 100 calories per day (6 teaspoons) and men to 150 calories a day (9 teaspoons). So, the bottom line is that most of us eat way too much. Read on to learn why this can be a problem and what you can do about it.

What’s the problem with added sugar?

If you eat or drink too much added sugar it can lead to health problems including tooth decay, overweight and obesity, difficulty controlling type 2 diabetes, higher triglyceride levels, and possibly heart disease. In addition, sugar is made up of “empty calories” — calories unaccompanied by fiber, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. Too much empty calories can crowd healthier foods from your diet.

What’s the difference between added sugar and naturally occurring sugar?

Added sugar is the sugar that manufacturers add to processed foods and drinks while they are being made. Sugar-sweetened beverages such as sodas, energy drinks, and sports drinks are by far the biggest sources of added sugar in the average American’s diet. They account for more than one-third of the added sugar we consume as a nation. Other sources include cookies, cakes, pastries, and similar treats; fruit drinks; ice cream, frozen yogurt and the like; candy; and ready-to-eat cereals. The sugar you add to your food at home is another source of added sugar.

Naturally occurring sugar, on the other hand, is the sugar found in whole, unprocessed foods, such as milk, fruit, vegetables, and some grains. One of the most common natural sugars is fructose, which is found in fruit. Another common natural sugar is lactose, which is found in milk.

How can I figure out how much added sugar I am consuming?

Start by looking at the Nutrition Facts Label (http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/nutrition/nutrition-facts-and-food-labels/the-basics-of-the-nutrition-facts-panel) on your food or drink package. Keep in mind that food manufacturers do not have to list naturally occurring sugars and added sugars separately on the label. However, at least you can see how much “total sugar” is in each serving. If you divide the number of grams of total sugar by four, that’s how many teaspoons of sugar you are ingesting. For example, if the Nutrition Facts Label says that a food or drink contains 40 grams of sugar per serving, that information tells you that 1 serving contains 10 teaspoons of sugar (equal to 160 calories).

Next, check the ingredient list which lists ingredients in order by amount with the largest amount listed first. Look for the word “sugar” or one of its many sweet aliases (http://blog.fooducate.com/nutrition-101/quick-food-facts/sugar-synonyms/). If one of these ingredients is listed among the first few, the food or drink is likely high in added sugar.

How can I cut down on my consumption of added sugar?

To make it easy, here are 10 simple ways to minimize added sugar in your diet:

• Don’t add it to foods. This is the easiest and most basic way to immediately reduce the amount of sugar you’re eating. Biggest targets: cereal, coffee and tea.

• Skip sugary beverages like soda and sports drinks; and choose water instead.

• Limit your consumption of fruit juice. When you do have it, make sure it’s 100 percent fruit juice — not juice drink that has added sugar. Better yet, have fresh fruit rather than juice.

• Choose breakfast cereals carefully. Scan the ingredient list for unwanted sugar and sugar aliases. Try to choose brands that contain more total fiber grams than total sugar grams. Skip the colorful and frosted brands.

• Go easy on condiments. Salad dressings and ketchup have added sugar. So do syrups, jams, jellies and preserves. Use them sparingly.

• If you eat canned fruit, choose the one packed in water or juice, not syrup.

• Cut way back on processed foods. These are often high in added sugar, as well as sodium and fat.

• Skip the cookies, cake, pies, ice cream and other sweets. Instead, choose naturally sweet fruit for your after-dinner treat.

• Watch out for “fat-free” snacks. Fat-free doesn’t mean calorie-free, and most fat-free snacks are loaded with sugar.

• Look for recipes that use less sugar when you are cooking or baking.

About the Author: Lorraine Matthews-Antosiewicz, MS RD, is a food and nutrition expert specializing in weight management and digestive health. She is committed to empowering people through education, support, and inspiration to make real changes that lead to optimal health and lasting weight loss. Take her Free Self-Assessment and learn how you can lose 20 lb. - or more. Jump Start your weight loss today! http://njnutritionist.com/freeassessment

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Diabetes, Your Teeth, And Gums

Diabetes, Your Teeth, And Gums

Submitted by: Vivian L. Brennan

Diabetes can lead to many complications, some of them very severe. This means that the effect that diabetes has on your teeth can often be completely overlooked. Diabetics are at a higher risk for periodontal disease (diseases of the mouth) than most people.

Having high blood sugar means that your teeth and gums are at a higher risk, because germs multiply in high-sugar environments. This means that the first step to protecting your teeth is to lower your blood sugar and to maintain a constant blood sugar level. The difficulty is that if you already have some gum disease, it can be another stress that leads to high blood sugar levels. This can be an overwhelming cycle, but luckily you can stop it.

Gingivitis is the first stage of gum disease. It is present when your gums are puffy and red, and your gums can bleed when you brush your teeth or use other dental care. Gum disease, although little more than a painful inconvenience, can progress until you lose your teeth. This makes it even more difficult to maintain a healthy diet needed by diabetics.

The first step to taking care of your oral health is to monitor and control your blood sugar. You will also want to tell your dentist that you have diabetes. Your dentist will be able to help you notice the initial signs of gingivitis, which can be hard to distinguish. Visiting the dentist two times a year is a good idea.

Oral hygiene, like we all know, begins with brushing your teeth regularly, particularly after sweet snacks and desserts. You can also take care of your mouth by watching what you put in your mouth: chewing sugar-free gum can also help reduce your risk of gum disease. Keep yourself hydrated by drinking lots of water, to maintain a healthy saliva flow in your mouth. Smoking is a bad habit that, among other diseases, will promote gum disease. Quit smoking immediately, because it has terrible effects on most diabetic complications.

Of course, brushing our teeth is not quite enough. Flossing daily should become part of your routine. Some dentists recommend using a water-pik to clean your teeth as well. Ask your dentist about what would be best for you. Certain mouthwashes are clinically proven to help prevent gingivitis: the simple 10 second act of gargling could save your teeth for the future!

Preventing gum disease is about taking care of yourself now to avoid pain in the future. Gum disease can lead to hyperglycemia, or even acidosis in severe cases. You want to avoid these symptoms, because they will make it even harder for you to control your blood sugar later. Remember: if you maintain a healthy diet, good oral hygiene, and helpful habits, you will save yourself time, money, and pain. You can have and keep the perfect smile!

About the Author: For more information on diabetes, visit The Guide to Diabetes. This site has information on how to prevent many kinds of diabetes-related complications.

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Cabbage | Red Cabbage | Health Benefits of Cabbage | Red Cabbage Juice Benefits | Red Cabbage Soup Diet

Cabbage | Red Cabbage | Health Benefits of Cabbage | Red Cabbage Juice Benefits | Red Cabbage Soup Diet

Submitted by: Medico News

Red Cabbage is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Thiamin, Riboflavin, Folate, Calcium, Iron and Magnesium, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Vitamin B6, Potassium and Manganese.

One cup of chopped crimson will add about 50 milligrams of vitamin C, as well as doses of fiber, folate and potassium. Studies have also revealed that a high intake of cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage offers protection from some cancers.

Health Benefits of Red Cabbage: It’s high in Vitamins A and C

Vitamins A and C are vitamins with strong antioxidant properties and red cabbage is a good source of both, particularly vitamin C. One serving provides three-quarters of the daily recommended quantity of this vitamin which is important for maintaining healthy skin and connective tissue. Who says citrus fruits are the only good source of vitamin C?

Health Benefits of Red Cabbage: It’s a Real Diet Food

Red cabbage is a guilt-free food if you’re a calorie counter. One cup of red cabbage has under thirty fat-free calories. The relatively high fiber content of red cabbage makes it a filling and satisfying side dish. No wonder the cabbage soup diet was so popular!

Health Benefits of Red Cabbage: It’s Better than It’s Green Cousin

Medicinal properties

In European folk medicine, cabbage leaves are used to treat acute inflammation. A paste of raw cabbage may be placed in a cabbage leaf and wrapped around the affected area to reduce discomfort. Some claim it is effective in relieving painfully engorged breasts in breastfeeding women.

Cabbage contains significant amounts glutamine, an amino acid, which has anti-inflammatory properties.

It is a source of indol-3-carbinol, or I3C, a compound used as an adjuvent therapy for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, a disease of the head and neck caused by human papillomavirus (usually types 6 and 11) that causes growths in the airway that can lead to death.

Health Benefits of Cabbage

1. Red cabbage contains beneficial protective phytochemicals such as indole-3-carbinole (I3C), sulforaphane, and indoles. Indole-3-carbinole (I3C) is plays an essential role in reducing the risk of breast cancer. These compunds are also required for regulating the formation and function of estrogen.

2. Cabbage belongs to the Cruciferae family of vegetables and has three major varieties, namely green, Savoy and red.

3. Cabbage has numerous health benefits. Researches and studies have revealed that red cabbage has higher amounts of nutrients and is beneficial for treating cancer, ulcers and various other health disorders.

4. Cabbage is a muscle builder, blood cleanser and eye strengthener.

5. The juice of fresh raw cabbage has been proven to heal stomach ulcer.

6. Cabbage is rich in iron and sulfur.

7. Juice of fresh cabbage is effective in treating fungus infection(due to it sulfur content).

8. Cabbage can lower serum cholesterol.

Modern science has proven beyond a reasonable doubt that the health benefits and therapeutic value of cabbage, which also plays a role in the inhibition of infections and ulcers. Cabbage extracts have been proven to kill certain viruses and bacteria in the laboratory setting. Cabbage boosts the immune system’s ability to produce more antibodies. Cabbage provides high levels of iron and sulphur, minerals that work in part as cleansing agents for the digestive system.

There are many different varieties of cabbage, so please, be brave and innovative. Green cabbage is the most popular, common and of course the one we are most familiar with. Take a walk on the wild side with Savoy cabbage. With yellow crinkled leaves, you can use this variety of cabbage as an alternate in many recipes. Let’s not forget Bok Choy, a routine addition to Chinese recipes that has a sweet, light, celery type familiarity. Red Cabbage. It goes without saying in that it simply has to be good for you given all that beautiful plant pigment where the majority of nutrition is stored. Red cabbage is good in salads and is commonly pickled. Napa cabbage has a mild sweet taste and is incredible in stir fry dishes.

Whatever your choice of cabbage may be, enjoy a serving at least once a week along with your other valuable and health promoting cruciferous vegetables. Try to cook your cabbage lightly. Steaming and quick stir fry dishes are considered to be the best methods for preserving the power packed natural nutrition given so freely by Mother Nature. Cabbage soup anyone?

Nutritive Values of Cabbage :

1. Vitamin A : 80 I.U.

2. Vitamin c : 50 mg.

3. Calcium : 46 mg.

4. Phosphorus : 31 mg.

5. Potassium : 140 mg.

6. Carbohydrates : 5.3 gm.

7. Protein : 1.4 gm.

8. Calories : 24

About the Author: Written by Medical News | Cancer News : http://mediconews.com

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People With Diabetes Are At Risk For Foot Ulcers, New Medications Sought

CureClick Diabetes foot ulcer diabetic image

 

by

Joseph

Approximately 29.1 million people in the US are affected by diabetes, and as a result are at risk of developing ulcers on their feet. Sadly, diabetics who suffer from foot ulcers often these open wounds or sores on the bottom of their feet. If the ulcer becomes infected, this could become very serious, and may require amputation. Better treatment for Diabetic Foot Ulcers is needed to prevent and treat this condition.

At this moment medical scientists are looking for new medications to treat diabetic foot ulcers.

Local doctors are enrolling research studies to develop potential medications for people with diabetes and foot ulcers. You may qualify for local research studies. But don’t delay – space is limited!

As a CureClick Ambassador I want to share this information with my readers because it could be helpful for medically treating people who have the troubling condition.

Conditions

Type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, foot ulcer, diabetic peripheral neuropathy

Age Range
At least 18 years old

For trial eligibility questionnaire and full trial details, please visit the sponsor website .

For those of you whom are not familiar with clinical trials, here's some information that you can use:

What Are Clinical Trials?


Clinical trials are research studies to determine whether investigational drugs or treatments are safe and effective for humans.

All investigational devices and medicines must undergo several clinical trials, often times these clinical trials require thousands of people.

Why participate in a clinical trial?

People whom are eligible will have access to new investigational treatments that would be available to the general public only upon approval.

People whom are eligible for clinical trials will also receive study-related medical care and attention from clinical staff at research facilities.

Clinical trials offer hope for many people and gives researchers a chance to find better treatment for others in the future.

 

Disclaimer: I am not participating in this clinical trial. I am providing this information to my readers as a CureClick Ambasssador. Click on the links below to learn about my relationship with Cureclick and why I'm talking about clinical trials.

 
 
How long, O LORD? Will you forget me forever? How long will you hide your face from me? How long must I take counsel in my soul and have sorrow in my heart all the day? How long shall my enemy be exalted over me?
Consider and answer me, O LORD my God; light up my eyes, lest I sleep the sleep of death, lest my enemy say, “I have prevailed over him,” lest my foes rejoice because I am shaken. But I have trusted in your steadfast love; my heart shall rejoice in your salvation. I will sing to the LORD, because he has dealt bountifully with me. Psalm 13:1-6
 
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Diabetes And Men's Health

Diabetes And Men's Health

Submitted by: Vivian L. Brennan

Men with diabetes have a higher incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED): a man with diabetes has a 4 in 5 chance of facing ED, whereas a man without diabetes has a 1 in 5 chance.

Erectile Dysfunction refers to an inability to achieve or maintain an erection hard enough for sexual intercourse. It falls under the blanket term impotence, which also covers other sexual problems such as lack of arousal and the inability to orgasm. Erectile dysfunction is not simply an occasional inability to perform sexually that occurs to every man; if you have erectile dysfunction, you will be unable to achieve or maintain an erection over 50% of the time.

Although erectile dysfunction often occurs with age, it is not a normal part of aging and can be treated. For men with diabetes, erectile dysfunction occurs an average of 10-15 years earlier than in other men.

Why does diabetes often lead to erectile dysfunction? Diabetes is linked with many nervous system disorders, and erectile dysfunction can be caused by nerve damage. Nervous system damage can cause erectile dysfunction because the nervous system tells your body when you are aroused. If you are emotionally aroused but your nervous system cannot send the message to your penis, then you will not get an erection. Diabetes can also cause blood vessel disorder. Vascular damage (damage to the blood vessels) alters the blood flow in the body. As an erection is caused when corpora cavernosa in the penis are filled with blood, vascular damage can affect erections. Erections are caused by the interplay of the nervous system and the vascular system, along with other factors.

People with diabetes are more apt to be depressed. Depression might be caused by poor blood sugar control and hormonal imbalance. Psychological factors can play a large role in erectile dysfunction.

How can you prevent erectile dysfunction if you have diabetes?

• Control your blood sugar levels. This will help you prevent possible nerve damage or damage to your vascular system. These are two of the complications from diabetes that can lead to erectile dysfunction.

• Talk to you doctor or health team. They will be particularly helpful for you if you are trying to maintain even blood sugar.

• Quit smoking. Smoking damages your blood vessels by making them contract.

• Don’t drink excessively. Excessive alcohol consumption can also damage your blood vessels.

• Exercise. Having a steady exercise regimen will help keep your nervous system and vascular system healthy.

• Eat well. Eating a well-balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables has been proven to prevent complications in diabetes, and will help you control your blood sugar levels.

• Calm yourself. If you are struggling with anxiety, depression, or other psychological issue that is inhibiting your sexual performance, see a professional. Often just the fear of erectile dysfunction is enough to hamper performance.

Treatments

If you are suffering from erectile dysfunction, consider seeing a urologist. A urologist specializes in sexual health and will be able to help you decide on the best treatment program. You might be prescribed medication, such as Viagra, that will help you achieve an erection. You might also consider using a vacuum pump to help blood enter the penis. To maintain the erection you place a ring at the base of the penis. You might consider having an implant or penile injections.

Before taking any medical action, try using the tips above to manage your erectile dysfunction. Diabetes does not necessarily have to lead to complications, which includes erectile dysfunction. You can lead a normal sexual life, even as you grow older. Knowing this information might help you find sexual energy you didn’t know you had!

About the Author: Vivian Brennan is an expert on diabetes, and is currently an editor at The Guide to Diabetes. She believes in educating people about diabetes to help manage diabetes, prevent complications, and improve lifestyles.

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