Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes - Be A Tortoise, Not A Hare, to Help Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Type 2 Diabetes - Be A Tortoise, Not A Hare, to Help Reduce Your Diabetes Risk
By Beverleigh H Piepers

The hare is quick. Like rabbits, they are fast-moving creatures. Tortoises, on the other hand, are anything but quick. Similar to sloths, no matter how hard they try there is a limit to how fast they can move. Now if we suggest you should move like a tortoise and not a hare when it comes to making changes to your lifestyle, you might get the impression we are advocating sluggishness over quickness. That is not the case. The difference comes down to efficiency.

In simple terms, trying to change too much too quickly is a risk you should not take. Changing your lifestyle to improve your health and body weight requires sustainable changes. Rarely is something great achieved in a hurry and also be sustainable. Implementing slow and gradual changes are in your favor because they create progress you can maintain. It is a more efficient way to build momentum and, in turn, will ultimately bring you greater results.

Let us examine this idea from a fat loss perspective. To lose weight, you know you have to make changes to your eating plan. It also helps if you work out because exercising is a useful tool, and it should be a staple in your lifestyle anyway. Be proud of yourself if you have started to make changes to your diet. If you have begun making exercise a habit, know you are on the right track.

Even with these significant steps forward, be careful with how aggressively you strive to change. Remember it is gradual changes that prove to be most effective in the long run. Do not overextend yourself. A common mistake is suddenly ramping up the intensity and volume of an exercise program. Many people start to get into an exercise routine for the first time in years and realize how great it feels. Since results are just around the corner, they begin to exert themselves more, and more. It soon becomes too much, because willpower has its limits. When you impose an excessive burden on yourself, fatigue sets in and it is just a matter of time before burnout results. Going to extremes ends up being the reason why many people abandon their goals.

Sometimes, less is more: this is why you should think like the tortoise. Slow and steady determination wins the race. There is such a thing as being overzealous, and it tends to prove costly. Besides, if you commit to gradual changes to both your diet and physical activity, you will develop habits that will stick. On its own, this would be a victory because there is nothing more compelling than yielding long-term results that start out halting any upward weight creep and ends up with you reducing your weight by fifteen pounds that will lower your Type 2 diabetes risk by almost 60 percent. And most people find the longer they keep their weight off the easier it becomes and the new habits become more firmly ingrained.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

For nearly 25 years, Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body. Go to http://DrugFreeType2Diabetes.com to learn about some of those secrets.

The answer isn't in the endless volumes of available information but in yourself.

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The Amazing Flaxseed And Diabetes Natural Treatment Connection Revealed

The Amazing Flaxseed And Diabetes Natural Treatment Connection Revealed
By Terry Robbins

A simple seed, but so many benefits. If flaxseed is not part of your diet, you are missing out whether you have diabetes or not. For diabetics, there is an amazing connection between flaxseed and diabetes for those looking for a natural cure (type 2 diabetes) or a way to manage blood sugar levels naturally.

The many health benefits of flaxseed

Before cotton became affordable, flax (Linum usitatissimum) also known as linseed, has a fibrous stem which was woven into cloth and is still used in this way today despite the prevalence of cotton, but the oil which was produced from the flaxseed has been used medicinally for thousands of years. It wasn't until about a thousand years ago that people started eating flaxseed for health and well being. The health benefits of flaxseed include but are not limited to;

1. Cancer

Flaxseed contains the most amount of lignans when compared to other plants. The amount of lignans in flaxseed is about 7 times more than that in its closest competitor (sesame seeds) and as much as 3,200 more than peanuts.

Lignans contain very powerful antioxidants which are crucial for preventing the damaging effects of free radicals in the body. Free radicals are unstable oxygen molecules that in order to stabilize or "heal" themselves, "steal" particles from healthy cells but this only ends up creating more free radicals. The effects of free radicals on the body are thought to increase the risk of developing various chronic diseases and conditions including cancer.

Lignans are particularly beneficial for reducing the risk of breast cancer. Estrogen which is the female hormone can stimulate the growth of cancer but lignans in addition to antioxidant benefits also contain phyto(plant)estrogens, which mimic the action of the estrogen produced by the body but are less potent.

These chemically weaker phytoestrogens bind to estrogen receptors in the body and this helps to stop the effects on the body of the much stronger estrogen produced by the body which allows excessive amounts of this much stronger estrogen to be eliminated from the body which helps to reduce the risk of breast cancer.

Studies have shown that women who consumed lignan reduced their risk of developing breast cancer by about 62 percent when compared to women who did not consume lignan.

Lignans are also beneficial for fighting against prostate cancer as has been shown in various research studies.

Other cancer fighting properties of flaxseed emanate from the polyunsaturated fats including omega-3 fatty acids as well as fiber that it contains. These compounds in addition to lignans help to promote health and well-being and reduce the risk of developing various diseases including cancer. The anti-inflammatory properties of flaxseed also help to protect against cancer and many other chronic diseases.

2. Heart attack

Lignans not only provide antioxidant benefits but as mentioned previously are also a rich source omega-3 fatty acids of which alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is the main type and ALA is able to lower the risk of suffering a fatal heart attack.

3. Cholesterol

Flaxseed is also able to lower the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol which is dangerous and can lead to heart disease. Flaxseed is rich in a type of soluble fiber that is beneficial for the body which is known as mucilage. This mucilage is tied to the cholesterol lowering properties of flaxseed.

4. Kidney disease

Research has shown that the lignans and omega-3 fatty acids contained in flaxseed are able to reverse the damage to the kidneys caused by lupus which is an autoimmune disease.

5. Hot flushes

The lignans or phytoestrogens contained in flaxseed can be beneficial for women dealing with the various symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes. The estrogen levels of women going through menopause usually start to decrease and instead of going through hormone therapy, phytoestrogens are a natural alternative as they can be used to replace some of this estrogen that is no longer produced by the body because estrogen can help to reduce the severity of hot flashes and phytoestrogens can help with this.

Flaxseed and diabetes

Soluble fiber galore

The connection between flaxseed and diabetes is related to the mucilage that was discussed previously which is the soluble fiber that is available in high amounts in flaxseed. This soluble fiber has been shown by various studies to be able to reduce blood sugar levels which is important to not only manage diabetes but to also cure it naturally.

Diabetes results when the body does not produce any or enough of the hormone insulin or the insulin produced becomes inefficient and/or ineffective (insulin resistance) leading to the accumulation of glucose or sugar in the blood. Insulin is supposed to remove this glucose from the blood and transfer it to the various cells in the body where it is used for fuel or energy for day to day activities.

When insulin is unable to perform its duties, this glucose accumulation in the blood can increase the risk of developing diabetes or leading to diabetes related complications (heart and kidney disease, limb amputations, diabetic coma, etc).

One aspect of managing diabetes naturally is by following a customized diabetic diet to help control the amount of glucose deposited into the blood.

This is what is so amazing about flaxseed and why it is so important for diabetes natural treatment. The soluble fiber in flaxseed helps to slow down digestion which means that the digestion of the carbs and sugars in the food that we eat and conversion of this into glucose to be deposited into the bloodstream will be slowed down which helps to prevent blood sugar spikes. This shows the importance of flaxseed for diabetes natural treatment.

If you are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, one of the ways of preventing you from developing type 2 diabetes is to increase your intake of this soluble fiber.

Weight loss

Another connection between flaxseed and diabetes is weight loss. Many people with diabetes especially those with type 2 diabetes are overweight. Getting your weight under control is an important aspect of natural diabetes treatment and this is another area that flaxseed can help.

In addition to soluble fiber, flaxseed also contains insoluble fiber (roughage). Both types of fiber are important for weight loss because they help you feel fuller faster and keep hunger pangs away for longer which can help you eat less and help with your weight loss goals. Overweight diabetics who are attempting to lose weight should always increase their fiber intake for the reasons discussed and flaxseed can help with this.

It is also important to remember that many people with type 2 diabetes also deal with high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, heart disease, etc, and as discussed previously, flaxseed can also help with these various health issues.

The connection shown above between flaxseed and diabetes makes this amazing seed crucial and an important part of any diabetic diet.

Getting the most

1. Flaxseed oil and diabetes

Flaxseed oil is produced from the seeds and many people skip out on the seeds and reach for the oil but you may want to think again. You may want to consider passing by the oil firstly because you will not get the all important fiber and secondly because while the oil may contain some health properties, most of the lignans, protein and minerals are found in the actual seeds and not the oil. Since you need fiber as a diabetic, pass on the oil and reach for the seeds instead.

Flaxseed oil is also easily perishable and must be stored in the refrigerator once opened.

2. Must be processed

Flaxseed is available in two varieties i.e. brown flax and golden flax (also known as yellow flax) which generally have similar nutritional compositions.

While some people love to sprinkle whole flaxseed on salads or fresh baked bread, the body cannot process whole flaxseeds. They will simply pass through the body undigested which means that you will not get the full benefits of flaxseed including soluble fiber.

Flaxseed must be processed but the ground flaxseed goes rancid very quickly so store it in the fridge but do not use after 30 days or so. While you can easily find ground flaxseed in grocery stores, it is not as fresh as freshly ground flaxseeds so think about getting a cheap spice or coffee grinder or other seed grinding tool so that you can grind two tablespoons or more of whole flaxseed and have it fresh to use each day to add to smoothies, oatmeal, sprinkled on hot or cold cereal, sprinkled on salads, etc.

While ground flaxseed (flaxseed meal) does not last more than 30 days or so when stored in the refrigerator, whole flaxseed can last 6 to 12 months or 1 to 2 years if stored in the refrigerator.

Safety precautions

Flaxseed is generally safe but it does contain a minute amount of cyanide which is not enough to harm an adult but could possibly harm a fetus or infant so avoid flaxseed if you are pregnant or nursing and do not give it to children under the age of two.

The minute amount of cyanide in flaxseed should not be harmful to most people if you only consume the recommended daily amount which is 2 to 3 tablespoons of ground flaxseed. It is also important to remember that there are usually very small amounts of cyanide that are constantly present in human tissue which are constantly being metabolized so the cyanide in flaxseed should not really be a cause for concern. Other plants such as cruciferous vegetables also contain small amounts of cyanide.

A tablespoon of flaxseed contains about 5 to 6 milligrams of cyanide but for cyanide to be dangerous to the human body, it would have to be in amounts of at least 1,000 milligrams.

Other precautions with flaxseed relate to allergic reactions. Some people may be allergic to flaxseed and if so, stop using it or reduce the dose.

Some people may also experience bloating and flatulence when they first start consuming flaxseed. If so, start with small amounts and gradually build up.

If you have diabetes, you should be eating flaxseed because of the amazing connection between flaxseed and diabetes [http://diabetestype1and2info.com/foods-that-cure-diabetes-the-top-vegetable-that-beats-all-other-vegetables/] natural treatment. For more tips and tricks on how to cure diabetes naturally, visit [http://diabetestype1and2info.com/foods-that-cure-diabetes-the-top-vegetable-that-beats-all-other-vegetables/] and discover the number one vegetable that fights diabetes.

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Cancer and Obesity: Do I Have Cancer?

Cancer and Obesity: Do I Have Cancer?
By Dr. Naresh Parajuli

Cancer and Obesity

Does obesity increase the risk of cancer?

Obesity

Obesity is measured in terms of body mass index (BMI).

BMI determines whether weight is in healthy range or is overweight or obese.

BMI = weight/height squared; For example, for a person weighing 80 kg and 170 m tall, BMI = 27.6

One is underweight if the BMI is less than 18.5

A person is said to have a healthy BMI if it is between 18.5 and 24.9

When BMI is between 25 to 29.9, it is defined as overweight

When the BMI is 30 or higher, the person is said to be obese.

How does obesity increase the risk of cancers?

Obesity increases the risk of cancer in a few ways:

  • Fat tissue in the body produces excess amounts of oestrogen. High levels of oestrogen increases the risk of breast, endometrial, bowel and some other cancers.
  • Obese people have high levels of insulin and insulin-like substances in their blood. These substances may promote the development of certain tumors.
  • Fat cells produce hormones called adipokines that may stimulate growth of certain cancers.
  • Obese people are said to have chronic low-level inflammation which is associated with increased risk of cancer.

What are the cancers associated with obesity?

Obesity is associated with increased risk of cancer of:

  • Esophagus
  • Thyroid
  • Colon and rectum
  • Kidney
  • Pancreas
  • Gallbladder
  • Breast (after menopause)
  • Uterus

What other diseases are associated with obesity?

Besides cancer, obesity is a major risk factor for many diseases including:

  • Diabetes
  • Heart diseases
  • High blood pressure
  • Arthritis
  • Sleep apnoea
  • Depression
  • Asthma
  • Gallbladder problems

How common is obesity?

Obesity has become an epidemic globally. According to World Health Organization (WHO):

  • Obesity has more than doubled since 1980 worldwide.
  • In 2014, more than 1.9 billion adults, 18 years and older, were overweight. Of these over 600 million were obese.
  • 39% of adults aged 18 years and over were overweight in 2014, and 13% were obese.

In the USA, about two-thirds of adults and nearly one-third of children are either overweight or obese.

Australia is today ranked as one of the fattest nations in the developed world. If weight gain continues at current levels, by 2025, close to 80% of all Australian adults and a third of all children will be overweight or obese (MODI).

If the obesity epidemic continues at the present state, despite the new advances in diagnosis and treatment of cancers, the number of cancer cases will increase significantly taking also into account the increasing life expectancy of people all over the world.

According to WHO, one-third of all cancer cases are preventable. The best way to prevent cancer is by adopting healthy lifestyle like eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy body weight, quitting smoking, and reducing/quitting alcohol.

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Heart Disease Kills Diabetics

Heart Disease Kills Diabetics
By Paul D Kennedy

About two-thirds of persons over 65 who die from diabetes have heart disease. In fact, the risk of dying from heart disease is several times higher among persons with diabetes compared to non-diabetics.

The Framingham Heart Study is a long-term continuous cardiovascular study of the residents of the Framingham, a town in Massachusetts in the USA. The study began in 1948 with 5,209 adult subjects and the grandchildren of the original subjects are now taking part. Much of our knowledge of heart disease and how it is affected by diet, exercise and various medicines first came to light during this ground-breaking trans-generational study.

Framingham was the first study to show that diabetics are more vulnerable to heart disease than non-diabetics, and that having multiple health issues increases the likelihood of heart disease. The health problems associated with heart disease include diabetes, being overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, smoking, and a family history of early heart disease.

The more risks factors a person has for heart disease, the greater the chance they will develop the disease. In addition, the probability of dying from heart disease is much greater for a diabetic. Thus while a person with one risk factor, such as high blood pressure, will have a particular chance of dying from heart disease, a person with diabetes has two to four times that risk of dying.

One medical study found that people with diabetes who had no other risk factors for heart disease were five times more likely to die of heart disease than non-diabetics. Another study indicated that diabetics were as likely to have a heart attack as non-diabetics who have already had heart attacks.

How diabetics get heart disease

The most common cause of heart disease in diabetics is atherosclerosis (hardening of the coronary arteries) due to a build-up of cholesterol in the blood vessels that supply the heart. This build-up usually begins before blood glucose levels increase noticeably. If you have abnormally high levels of cholesterol there is an 85% chance that you also have diabetes.

Cholesterol is a microscopic ingredient found in the membranes of animal cells, including humans. It holds the thin membranes of your body cells together; without cholesterol your body would collapse into a jelly-like heap. It also has a role in sending signals to your cells along your nerves. In addition, it is the raw material your body uses to make certain hormones, as well as vitamin D.

About 75 to 80% of your cholesterol is made by synthesising other substances inside your body. The rest comes from the animal products you eat. If you eat too much cholesterol, your body will reduce the amount of cholesterol it makes... provided your system is working properly. If not, you will end up with too much cholesterol.

Cholesterol is transported through the blood stream to where it is needed to build cells. Because it is insoluble, it has to be carried within lipoproteins, which are soluble in blood. These can be either low-density lipoproteins (LDL) or high density lipoproteins (HDL). The problem is LDL - when too many particles of cholesterol are being delivered by LDL, they tend to collide and become damaged.

These damaged particles cause plaques (raised bumps or small scars) to form on the walls of the arteries. These plaques are fragile. When a plaque ruptures, the blood around it starts to clot. To contain the rupture, the clot will grow. If the clot grows big enough, it will block the artery.

If an artery that carries blood to your heart becomes blocked, you'll have a heart attack. If the blood vessels in your feet get blocked, you'll end up with peripheral vascular disease. Once you have too much cholesterol in your blood you are on your way to angina, heart disease and stroke, and irreversible damage to the tiny blood vessels in your eyes and kidneys.

How diabetics can be treated for heart disease

Depending on its severity, heart disease in persons with diabetes can be treated in several ways. These include:

  • Aspirin therapy
  • Diet
  • Exercise
  • Medications
  • Surgery

Aspirin therapy

For type 2 diabetics who are aged over 40 and are at high-risk for heart disease and peripheral vascular disease, a daily low-dose of aspirin reduces the risks of the clots that lead to heart attacks and strokes.

Diet

A plant-focused diet such as the one that I recommend for treating diabetes will also help treat hard disease. This easy to follow diet means that you eat food that is... natural... low in sugar... low in fat... low in salt... high in fibre... with low GI values... which is mostly plants. You also need to avoid eggs and dairy products, and drink plenty of water.

This is not a vegetarian or vegan diet as you can still eat meat provided it is ultra-lean. However, early studies do indicate that a vegan diet may have a number of benefits for persons with heart disease but more research is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

Exercise

As well as helping you lose excess weight, regular exercise will improve your blood glucose levels, high blood pressure, cholesterol levels and to decrease abdominal fat, all of which are risk factors for heart disease.

Both aerobic and anaerobic exercises increase the mechanical efficiency of the heart. Aerobic exercise increases cardiac output (the volume of blood being pumped by the heart) and anaerobic strength training increases the thickness of your heart muscles.

The beneficial effects of exercise on the cardiovascular system have been well documented. A study that tracked physical activity among adults with type 2 diabetes over 19 years found that those who undertook at least four hours a week of moderate exercise were about 40% less likely to succumb to heart disease than sedentary people. They also cut their risk of getting a stroke.

Medications

Many medications are used to treat heart disease. Here's a sampling:

ACE inhibitors widen or dilate blood vessels to improve the amount of blood the heart pumps and to lower blood pressure. Angiotension II Receptor Blockers reduce chemicals that narrow the blood vessels, allowing blood to flow more easily.

Antiarrhythmics are used to treat abnormal heart rhythms resulting from irregular electrical activity of the heart. Blood thinners or anticoagulants, such as Warfarin, help prevent clots from forming in the blood. Antiplatelets prevent the formation of blood clots. Clot busters are used in thrombolytic therapy to break up blood clots.

Beta-blockers are one of the most widely used drugs for high blood pressure and are a mainstay in the treatment of congestive heart failure. Calcium channel blockers relax blood vessels and increase the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart while also reducing the heart's workload. Digoxin helps an injured or weakened heart work more efficiently to send blood through the body.

Diuretics help get rid of unneeded water (which makes it easier for the heart to pump) and salt (a cause of high blood pressure) through the urine. Nitrates are vasodilators used to treat angina in persons with coronary artery disease or chest pain caused by blocked blood vessels of the heart.

As you can see, most of these medications mitigate the various deleterious effects of heart disease. But they don't actually cure the disease. Once you start taking them you have to continue for the rest of your life.

Surgery

There are many surgical techniques for treating heart disease. These range from the insertion of simple stents to heart transplants.

Stents are small expandable tubes used to reinforce weakened arteries or to open up arteries that have been narrowed by the build-up of plaque. In heart-bypass surgery the problem of blocked coronary arteries is overcome by creating a new pathway to the heart for the blood. Heart-valve surgery is used to repair damaged valves in the heart.

People with abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmia) can be treated with cardioversion in which electrical signals are sent to the heart muscle to restore a normal rhythm which allows the heart to pump more effectively. A pacemaker is a small device that sends electrical impulses to the heart muscle to maintain a suitable heart rate and rhythm. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is an electronic device that constantly monitors the heart rate and rhythm and which, when it detects an abnormal rhythm, delivers energy to the heart muscle, causing the heart to beat in a normal rhythm again.

A Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) is a kind of mechanical heart that is placed inside a person's chest, where it helps the heart pump blood throughout the body. A heart transplant is the replacement of a diseased heart with a heart from a healthy donor who has died.

In the main, the purpose of surgery for heart disease is to rectify the underlying condition.

Summary

If you are diabetic, there is a strong probability that you have or will develop heart disease also. The most common cause of heart disease in diabetics is atherosclerosis and if you have cholesterol issues there is an 85% chance that you also have diabetes.

Heart disease can be treated with a combination of aspirin therapy, a plant-focused diet and exercise. There are many medicines for ameliorating the various deleterious effects of the disease. Surgical techniques to rectify the underlying condition range from the insertion of stents to heart transplants.

When you are diagnosed with diabetes, you will probably be checked for heart disease. The diet and exercise regime that will help you beat your diabetes should also be helpful in dealing with your heart disease.

Paul D Kennedy is a type 2 diabetic. He used his skills as an international consultant and researcher to find a way to control his diabetes using diet alone and, about five years ago, he stopped taking medications to control his blood glucose levels. You can find out more from beating-diabetes.com or by contacting Paul at paul@beating-diabetes.com. His book Beating Diabetes is available for download from Amazon or as a printed edition from Create Space online book store.

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Three Most Common Causes For Low Blood Pressure

Three Most Common Causes For Low Blood Pressure

Three Most Common Causes For Low Blood Pressure
By Dr. Dorothy Adamiak, ND

Poor circulation and low blood pressure is more common than generally believed. As health practitioners and patients keep focusing on hypertension, hypotension is usually overlooked or dismissed. Yet, many of us may be experiencing blood pressure dips without being aware of it.

Sporadic bouts of fatigue, chronic exhaustion, frequent yawning, daytime sleepiness, mental dullness, poor memory and even brittle nails all may be signs of insufficient circulation.

The causes of hypotension may vary from person to person and depend on genetic, environmental and circumstantial factors. However, many of those can be controlled, provided that the individual is aware of them. Here is a list of just three most common controllable causes for low blood pressure.

    • Dehydration: Experts say that one should drink 8 glasses of water a day, yet despite this straightforward advice we frequently end up below the guidelines. It is because many of us rely solely on the sense of thirst. Yet, thirst has been found to be consistently unreliable. It simply cannot be used as a hydration gauge.

 

    • Nutritional deficiency: Everyone knows that nutrition is a very important determinant of health. Heart cannot pump without energy and blood cannot flow without being propelled. For that you need nutrients, and lots of them. Yet, a multivitamin won`t do in this case as crucial macronutrients for blood flow must come from food, not from pills. Among the most vital circulatory macronutrients are: sugars, electrolytes, and protein. These three are responsible for increasing blood pressure.

 

  • Adrenal fatigue: Stress, worry, and grief are very hard on the body and if prolonged they may lead to adrenal fatigue or even adrenal exhaustion. Fatigued adrenals alter production of hormones and neurotransmitters which in turn cause changes in the blood flow. Adrenal fatigue is largely an under-recognized phenomenon, although its extreme form called Addison`s disease is a well-known to health practitioners reason for chronic hypotension.

The above conditions are three most common reasons for low blood pressure. Fortunately, they are also easily reversible, especially if one works with a qualified health care provider that is capable of detecting the causes, determining the needs, and also the one that will be assessing the progress.

Causes for hypotention however, are not limited only to dehydration, nutritional deficiencies, and adrenal fatigue. There are also other reasons. Among them are: hidden blood loss, anemia, nervous system failure, dysautonomia, food sensitivities, POTS, and others. Regardless of the underlying reasons follow these four simple circulatory boosters below, so you can experience an immediate improvement in your well-being:

    • Keep on drinking plenty of water and if possible drink it extra cold. Cold water has been shown to boost circulation to the same degree as coffee does.

 

    • Do not skip meals; low blood sugar that results from non-eating can contribute to hypotension

 

    • Add a pinch of salt to food; sodium lost during digestion and sweat must be replaced. Insufficient sodium contributes to low blood pressure and chronic fatigue

 

  • Adjust your diet to support adrenals; adrenals need large quantities of vitamin C. Add oranges, grapefruit, kiwis, and lemon to your diet to ensure a good supply of this nutrient.

To read about other reasons behind hypotension visit Dr D's blog http://goo.gl/8Xlhos

For a more comprehensive look, quick tips and permanent solutions to low and fluctuating blood pressure refer to The Guide, a comprehensive read on perfecting circulation: http://amzn.to/1PBZOx8

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From Fatigue to Vitality...The Hormone Connection

From Fatigue to Vitality...The Hormone Connection

Submitted by: Varsha Rathod, M.D.

From Fatigue To Vitality…
The Hormone Health Connection

Depression, fatigue, chronic pain, weight gain, and anxiety are among the most common complaints of patients seen in my office. I hear these symptoms described on a daily basis. I often meet patients who are frustrated: they don’t feel well, yet their doctors have drawn labs and ordered tests that have not lead to satisfactory solutions. They can’t find anything wrong, and so they send patients away with a prescription for an antidepressant and the familiar advice that the problem is mental, not physical—It’s all in your head. I repeatedly find that these very real symptoms are actually the result of hormonal imbalance.

Most patients are familiar with estrogen and progesterone. However, other forms such as insulin, cortisol, DHEA, thyroid, luteinizing hormones (LH), growth hormone, melatonin, and numerous intestinal hormones also contribute to our overall health and well-being. Hormones—chemicals released by glands—signal organs to function in a precise mode. A low thyroid level, for instance, negatively affects neurological, cardiological, metabolic, and uterine function. Our hormonal level responds to such external cues as stress, nutrition, light exposure, and toxicity by directing glands to produce different amounts of hormones to adapt to our environment.

Symptoms: Unexplained weight gain, decreased appetite, chronic fatigue, depression, and a persistent chill...

These symptoms often indicate an abnormally functioning thyroid gland. The thyroid produces a hormone that controls the rate at which our cells operate. An unstable thyroid gland can lead to multiple symptoms. Many of my patients suspect that they have a thyroid problem. However, previous testing has come back negative, signaling that the thyroid is operating fine. Most physicians test TSH and T3 Free when checking thyroid function. Yet the patient is tired, gaining weight, always cold, or depressed. Women may experience heavy and frequent periods, painful constipation or have a persistently hoarse voice. In my thyroid examination, I recommend a full panel (blood test), which includes TSH, T3 free, T4 free, T3 total, reverse T3, and thyroid peroxidase. When appropriate, I also suggest a 24-hour urine iodine test. This additional lab work often discovers thyroid malfunction that the TSH and T3 Free tests have missed.

Solution: Call the office to get a complete set of thyroid labs done and a doctors’ consultation to determine the best course of action.

Symptoms: Inability to handle stress, poor mental focus, and extreme fatigue... Stress is the result of physical and emotional imbalance that your body cannot correct on its own. When a person is constantly exposed to stressful situations, the adrenal glands become overworked. Initially, the adrenal glands produce too much cortisol in order to compensate for the extra stress. If the stressful situation persists, levels of cortisol will eventually decrease. The outcome is adrenal gland fatigue, which can lead to exhaustion. Located on the top of the kidneys, the adrenal glands continually manufacture cortisol, excitatory neurotransmitters, hormones associated with salt and water metabolism, and sex hormones. In addition to chronic fatigue, patients with improper cortisol levels often experience pigmentation (skin discoloration), allergies, chemical sensitivities, low blood pressure, weight gain in the abdomen and behind the neck. After saliva and/or urine tests have been obtained, correcting cortisol levels may involve adjusting lifestyle (i.e. yoga, Thai-chi, etc.), nutritional maintenance, supplement support or hormone support, based on individual needs.

Solution: Measure salivary and urine hormone levels and schedule a doctors consultation to determine the best course of action. Symptoms: Irregular menstruation, hot flashes, mood swings, headaches, and breast tenderness...

Symptoms of unbalanced estradiol and progesterone are commonly described as Premenstrual Syndrome. Pre-menstrual Syndrome is an extensive disorder, responsible for irregular menstruation, hot flashes, mood swings, weight gain, breast tenderness, and headaches. Uneven levels of estradiol and progesterone might be due to a deficiency of nutrients, minerals, and essential fatty acids; stress can even trigger hormone release.

The ovaries release estradiol and progesterone rhythmically, over a 28 day cycle. Initially, rising levels of estradiol instruct the hypothalamus and pituitary gland to release LH, the hormone that signals ovulation. During ovulation, the fertile woman can become pregnant. If she does not, however, estradiol levels fall and progesterone levels rise.

Symptoms of Excessive Estrogen or Progesterone:

? Mood Swings
? Breast tenderness
? Fibrocystic breasts
? Headaches
? Decreased Libido
? Candida infections
? Dizziness
? Uterine fibroids

Symptoms of Low Estrogen or Progesterone:

? Hot Flashes
? Night Sweats
? Foggy thinking
? Tearful
? Depressed
? Heart palpitations
? Incontinence
? Sleep disturbances

“As women have lived increasingly longer lives, they are facing problems their grandmothers never faced. At the turn of the century, women died soon after their ovaries quit.” Charles Hammond, M.D.

Meno pause is the decline of the rhythmically cycling hormones. Though women still maintain low levels of hormones to ensure certain vital functions, the regularity of the 28 day cycle disappears. As the population ages, more and more women complain of negative symptoms associated with menopause. The lifespan for a healthy female has never been longer—currently, women can expect to live an average of eighty years.

The extended lifespan, largely the result of better sanitation and available healthcare, means that women live at least 30 post-menopausal years, and experience the myriad of symptoms that accompany low hormonal levels. The body interprets these low hormonal levels as a signal that the lifespan is nearing its end, and the body in turn begins to degenerate through rapid aging, autoimmunity, and various forms of cancer. Intuitively, using hormones that are similar in composition to the body’s own hormones makes sense. What makes even more sense is using these hormones cyclically, as the body did in its pre-menopausal state. I recommend this rhythmic dosage, in imitation of the natural female cycle.

Solution: Call to set up an appointment and for more information, please visit www.preventivemedicinestl.com.

MEN: Symptoms: Depression, muscle weakness, unexplained aches and pains, and decreased sex drive...

These symptoms are associated with low levels of Testosterone, a hormone produced in the testes. Like estrogen and progesterone, testosterone ebbs and flows with the males’ 28 day cycle, a discovery only recently being employed in clinical practice. Nature has synchronized male and female rhythms to facilitate reproduction and mutual aging Venus and Mars working in conjunction to effect maximal harmony. The woman's cycle is the major trigger for her male partners’ cycle. Testosterone is released by a similar mechanism that releases an egg from the ovary. Symptoms of low testosterone are extensive, and include: depression, apathy, a sluggish metabolism, muscle weakness, unexplained aches and pains, and increased abdominal girth (i.e. “potbelly”). Blood and saliva testing are used to determine testosterone levels.

Solution: Have your hormone levels checked and consider hormone therapy if levels are critically low. IN SUMMARY

I have only just begun the discussion of the vital role hormones play in ensuring optimal health. To put it simply, hormonal imbalances and disturbances are at the root of many chronic human diseases. We are responsible for our own hormonal imbalances. We eat badly, expose ourselves to an infinite number of toxins, and then expect our body to fix itself. The demands that we place on our bodies necessitates the careful, precise calibration of our hormones to restore our bodies to their natural, balanced states. —Varsha Rathod, M.D.

About the Author: About the Author: Dr. Varsha Rathod is a Board Certified Rheumatologist and Internist. Preventive Medicine has focused on a combination of traditional and holistic medicine since 1967. For more information about alternative solutions, visit http://www.preventivemedicinestl.com or call 314-997-5403.

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To Supplement or Not to Supplement

To Supplement or Not to Supplement

Submitted by: Glenn Antoine

It is a known fact that vitamins, minerals and micro-nutrients are essential to good health. If this world were perfect we would get all these nutrients from the food we eat on a daily basis. However, because this does not always happen, there are some convincing reasons to consider taking vitamin, mineral or micro-nutrient supplements.

Vitamins can help us overcome our lifestyle problems. On the whole, we are not very responsible when it comes to healthy habits. Many people play with their lives by smoking, drinking alcohol to excess, not getting adequate exercise or sleep, making poor choices in foods, and many other activities that lead to poor health. By taking vitamins every day, some of these negative effects may be counteracted.

Women in particular have special vitamin needs related both to osteoporosis and pregnancy issues. Although men can also have osteoporosis, it tends to attack women more and cause them greater suffering. By supplementing with calcium on a daily basis, much of the risk for osteoporosis can be offset and some of the latest research is showing that vitamin D plays a significant role in the prevention of osteoporosis. For women who are pregnant or considering having children, folic acid is an essential supplement. This B vitamin can prevent birth defects such as Spina Bifida in newborn babies. Lastly for pre-menopausal women there is overwhelming research showing that a large percentage of the population is iron deficient.

Men, too, have issues that can be fought through proper vitamin intake. Cardiovascular problems are thought to be reduced by taking vitamin E supplements. They are believed to play an important role in keeping the blood pressure and cholesterol levels low in most males aged forty and over. Keeping the arteries clean is an important factor in preventing heart attacks and vitamin E has been shown in research studies to accomplish this task.

Dieters have special supplementation needs of their own. Many young girls diet on a regular basis and consume far too few calories to accommodate their vitamin needs. While the wisdom of going on particular weight loss diets is a topic for another discussion, anyone on such a diet should look to vitamin supplements to avoid malnutrition and other maladies. Inadequate nutrition can cause a person to be vulnerable to various ailments and a weakened immune system.

Another great reason to consider vitamin supplementation is the potential cancer prevention some vitamins are believed to provide. Research has suggested that vitamin E and vitamin A prevent skin cancer. Many studies in recent years have found that other types of cancers may be similarly prevented by taking certain vitamins.

While there is never a fail proof plan when it comes to vitamin supplements, the evidence does suggest that risk may be reduced and conditions may be improved through supplementation. Due to all of the possible benefits, supplementation is definitely worth considering. Lastly, while I have not even scratched the surface of the benefits and the various nutrients that we need to optimize our body’s ability to rebuild and repair itself on a daily basis please take the time to ensure that you are getting these vital nutrients on a daily basis for a long healthy life.

References:

1) The American Society for Nutritional Sciences Website - 813S

2) PubMed Website Articles: Zinc Supplementation artid=131177

3) American Heart Association Website: Antioxidants - identifier=2062

4) American Heart Association Website: Homocysteine - identifier=442

About the Author: Glenn has combined his passion for health and fitness with a great business model that allows him opportunities that would have otherwise not been possible. For more information visit: http://www.aginghealthier.com/ or http://www.opportunityofyourlife.com/

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Cooking Healthy With Quinoa - This Super Food Belongs in Your Diet

Cooking Healthy With Quinoa - This Super Food Belongs in Your Diet

Submitted by: Susanne Myers

One thing that most of us have in common is the desire to feed our kids, and ourselves, nutritious food. But, when faced with the array of choices, it gets confusing. What's good, what's bad... it's not easy to distinguish the difference sometimes.

Even though quinoa has been around for thousands of years, it hasn't hit America's grocery shelves until recently. Over the last few years, quinoa has exploded in cookbooks, cooking shows, and the internet. This 'super-food' is becoming quite popular in many circles; including vegetarian, vegan, weight loss, gluten-free, and fitness diets.

Quinoa is a seed, a relative of beets, spinach, and Swiss chard. Because it is not a grass or grain, quinoa is considered the perfect food for those with grain, like wheat, sensitivities. The awareness of gluten-free diets may have likely brought quinoa into the limelight. However, quinoa is proving to fit into many diets for a wide range of reasons. Let's take a look at a few benefits that quinoa offers us all:

Protein: Not all foods considered high in protein contain all the essential amino acids in proper proportions for maximum effectiveness in the body, but quinoa does. Quinoa is a complete protein, meaning it contains all essential amino acids in perfect proportions. In fact, quinoa has the same protein quality as milk. For a vegan, or a vegetarian who doesn't drink milk, quinoa is the perfect replacement food. Mix in some black beans in a simple soup or casserole, and you have the ultimate protein-rich super-food.

Minerals: The most concentrated amounts of minerals in quinoa are manganese, magnesium, and phosphorus. With just one serving of quinoa, you will have more than half the RDA of manganese alone, neutralizing those damaging free radicals that are constantly attacking our organs. Along with manganese, quinoa contains high concentrates of magnesium and phosphorous which are both essential minerals aiding in bone health, heart and cardiovascular health, as well as nerve and brain health. Quinoa completes the mineral wheel with ample supplies of calcium, iron, potassium, zinc, copper, and selenium, all vital to our health and well-being.

Vitamins: The highest concentrated vitamin in quinoa is folate. Folate is a B vitamin that is essential for healthy red blood cell development as well as healthy tissue and organ development, most notably during a child's early years. Folate is also believed to fight the destructive cell developments of cancer. Other vitamins that can be found in a good supply in quinoa are vitamin E, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin B6, all essential in the growth, repair, and functioning of vital organs, blood, and tissue.

Dietary Fiber: You probably hear a lot about dietary fiber in advertisements aimed at curing constipation. But, the fact is, dietary fiber is crucial for all of our body functions. With a whopping 21% RDA in one serving of quinoa, eating a regular diet including this super-food makes sense. Why? Not only does fiber aid the digestive system, it also is known to lower blood cholesterol levels. Studies also show that increasing fiber in your diet will help reduce blood pressure which promotes heart health. A good diet rich in fiber helps control blood sugar levels by slowing the absorption of sugars. Along with these benefits, high-fiber diets also may help with weight loss, due to the fact that foods that are high in fiber and low in calories, like quinoa, fill you up without added calories.

It appears that if you had to choose one food to survive on, quinoa may be your best bet. This super-food contains just about everything a body needs - fiber, vitamins, minerals, healthy fat, carbohydrates, and protein. Add to that the fact that quinoa is low in calories, has zero cholesterol, zero sugars, and is low in sodium, and you've got the perfect food to add to your family's healthy diet.

How do you get more quinoa into your diet? You can do much more than substituting quinoa in dishes that call for rice or pasta. Rather, start by remembering that quinoa is a protein. With that in mind, think about quinoa like you do black beans, another vegetarian source of protein. Replace meat meals with quinoa meals on a regular basis to enjoy all the benefits of this super food. Go ahead and clear a spot in your pantry, because once you cook with quinoa, you'll be stocking up.

About the Author: Susanne Myers wants to help you learn what it takes to eat right and stay fit, even with a hectic lifestyle and a tight budget. Find healthy recipes and tips for cooking with quinoa as well as other nutritious foods. And, visit us often at www.HillbillyHousewife.com for even more ideas and tips for living well.

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Facts About the Glycemic Index

Facts About the Glycemic Index

Submitted by: Adrian Joele

One of the important factors when trying to loose weight is to choose foods that keep your insulin levels fairly constant. This is especially true in regards to carbohydrates. When we eat foods that contain carbohydrates, the carbohydrates are digested in the stomach and intestines and are absorbed into the bloodstream, generally in the form of glucose.

When the carbohydrates we eat cause the blood sugar to quickly rise to high levels,excess insulin can cause to much sugar to be absorbed by the cells.This results in a condition of low blood sugar. The subsequent stress on the body stimulates the adrena glands to secrete hormones into the blood. Metabolism rises, glucose is manufactured from stores in the liver and the entire body may be activated in what is called “fight-or-flight response.”

The Glycemic Index (GI) is a classification of ranking of carbohydrates, based on their potential for raising blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates that are broken down slowly and cause only a moderate increase in blood sugar, have a low Glycemic Index. Some carbohydrates fall in between.

Specifically, the Glycemic Index measures how much a 50-gram portion of carbohydrates raises your blood sugar levels compared with a control. The control is either white bread or pure glucose. Glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream faster than any other carbohydrate and is thus given the value of 100. Other carbohydrates are given a number relative to glucose. Foods with low GI indices are released into the bloodstream at a slower rate than high GI foods.

All carbohydrates cause some temporary rise in your blood glucose level. This is called the glycemic response. A number of factors influence this response: the amount of food eaten, the digestion and absorption rate of food, including the physical structure, ripeness, particle seize, the degree of processing and preparation, the commercial brand, the nature of the starch, acidity and the characteristics of the diabetic patient. These factors naturally effect each food’s glycemic index position or rank.

The slower your body processes the food, the slower the insulin is released and the healthier the overall effect is on your body. In addition, differences exist in the glycemic indexes due to the choice of reference food, the timing of blood sampling or the computational method used to calculate the glycemic index.

When you desire to lose weight, you choose the foods that raise your blood sugar level slowly. You’ll discover that many of those foods are high in fiber and will keep you feeling fuller for a longer period of time. And if you have been on a diet, you will be thankful for this. The longer you feel satisfied, the less temptation you will have to eat something in between your meals that will spike your blood sugar.

As fructose is a slow moving sugar, almost all fruits, except bananas and dried fruits, have a low GI. Also, all vegetables that contain lots of fiber, except carrot and corn. Whole grains, starches and pasta have a higher GI. On top of the list are white bread, refined grains and some potatoes.

Following the latest research it appears that women experience cravings about 10 times during the day. The most common times for these cravings to appear are at 10 am and 4 pm. Interesting enough, these cravings correspond almost exactly to your low blood sugar levels as well as your low levels of serotonin. This is a chemical that drives women to start eating. And because the drive is so strong, it’s quite difficult to overcome.

Research performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Clinical Research Center uncovered this truth when it found a relationship between carbohydrates in the brain and weight loss. Dr. J. Wurtman, lead researcher of the study, demonstrated, that eating carbohydrates high on the GI raised the levels of serotonin in the brain.

The results also showed that women suffering from premenstrual syndrome eat to many carbohydrates and as a result gain weight. Others overeat when they are depressed, stressed or angry in an effort to balance these serotonin levels.

The objectives of diet management in diabetic patients are to reduce hyperglycemia, prevent hyperglycemic episodes, and reduce the risk of complications. For people with diabetes, the GI is a useful tool in planning to achieve and maintain glycemic control. High GI foods are absorbed quickly into the bloodstream, causing an escalation in blood glucose levels and increasing the possibility of hyperglycemia. The body compensates for the rise in blood sugar levels with an accompanying increase in insulin, which within a few hours can cause hypoglycemia. As a result, awareness of the glycemic indices of food assists in preventing large variances in blood glucose levels.

A low GI pre-event meal may be beneficial for athletes who respond negatively to carbohydrate-rich foods prior to exercise or who can’t consume carbohydrates during competition. Athletes are advised to consume carbohydrates of moderate to high GI during prolonged exercise to maximize performance, approximately 1 gram per minute of exercise. Following exercise, moderate to high GI foods enhance glycogen storage.

The fat content of food is one of the components that affect the GI. Like fiber, fat acts like a brake on the absorption process. Apart from this fact, fat just make food to taste better. Fats also play an important role of signaling your body to stop eating. This is vital to any weight-management program. The fat that you eat causes the body to release a hormone called cholecystokinin. This hormone is stored in the stomach until notified by the presence of fat and is responsible for informing the brain that you’re satisfied. It really is a marvellous thing and it means you don’t have to deprive yourself.

Another factor that influence the absorption rate of glucose is the protein content of the food. Protein seems to have the greatest effect when it comes down to satisfying those hunger pangs,especially for a long period of time and makes you feel fuller. Protein also helps you to stay alert. However, we have to be aware of the good and the bad protein. Always make sure you choose the lean protein in either beef, fish, chicken or plant-based protein.

Protein itself rates zero on the GI scale, this means you don’t have to be sparingly by adding it to your diet, only watch the calorie content. It slows down the rise in insulin that happens when you eat any form of carbohydrate. This means, if you add some protein to a food that ranks high on the GI scale, you will counteract the spiking effect in insulin rise. Another benefit of protein is, that it keeps you feeling full longer after you eat it.It is therefore a good idea to add some protein to your breakfast. And if you take a snack, make sure it contains some form of protein.

If you like fish, you are doing yourself a favor. Fish not only slows down the spiking in your insulin level, it also contains a rich source of Omega-3 fatty acids. Eat fish at least twice a week.

The Glycemic Index is an excellent tool. It provide you with a weight-management system that puts you in control of the foods you eat, how much you eat, the way you eat and when you like to eat. When you have a good variety of foods from which to choose, it makes it easier to stay with the system.

Try eating according to the Glycemic Index, you will be pleasantly surprised how easy it is to keep your weight under control and you’ll also find that your energy level will rise as a bonus!



About the Author: Adrian Joele became interested in nutrition and weight management while he was an associate with a nutritional supplement company. Since 2008 he wrote several articles about nutrition and weight loss and achieved expert status with Ezine http://Articles.com. He has been involved in nutrition and weight management for more than 12 years and he likes to share his knowledge. Get his free report on nutrition and weight loss plus tips for healthy living, by visiting: http://www.nutrobalance2.net

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How Cancer Starts

How Cancer Starts

Submitted by: Adrian Joele

The process by which normal cells become cancer cells has to do with genetic damage,

that is, the genes that we have inherited become damaged.

Our body is build-up of approximately 75 trillion cells and there are many different

types of cells of every part of our body. They continually replicate themselves.

Each cell has a set of genetic instructions in its center, called the DNA, which controls cell growth, development and replication.

The DNA is the vital component that gets damaged, the chemical blueprint in genes,

in the form of oxidation and the main cause of this is reactive oxygen ( technically

eferred to as reactive oxygen species ) , or the more common name: free radicals.

When DNA is damaged by free radicals, it can replicate a damaged cell.

When this cell replicates itself, it can become cancer.

Cancer is fundamentally an oxidative process and many types of cancers depend on the

conversion of particular molecules in the cells or carcinogenic chemicals to reactive

oxidised forms. The oxidation is largely caused by free radicals.

Oxidation in our body is the main cause of many forms of cancer, heart disease,

atheroclerosis, adult onset of diabetes, cataracts, lung – and liver disorders and

degenerative diseases of the brain.

Every day, the DNA in each cell in our body faces about 10,000 attacks from cell-

damaging forces known as free radicals, which are unstable oxygen molecules

that have lost an electron.

Ironically, both chemotherapy and radiotherapy that are used to treat cance

cause more oxidation.

In healthy living cells, reactive oxygen species are formed continuously during

the process of respiration in the cells.

Although the body is well equipped to repair genetic (DNA) damage, the repair processes

are usually less than 100 % efficient. Despite even extensive repair, oxidized DNA is

usually abundant in human tissues. Significantly, damaged DNA is particularly abundant

in tumors. The damage rate may be up to 10 modifications in each cell every day,

so it is apparent that damage accumulates with age.

The CSIRO Division of Human Nutrition believes that this increase in genetic damage

with age is due to the cumulative effects of free radical damage and dietary and

environmental chemicals that damage genes.

Our bodies have to face daily an over production of free radicals, caused by our polluted environment, stressful lifestyles and mal nutrition. Free radicals are naturally produced as your body turns fuel to energy, you can get them also from stress, smoking and radiation from the sun.

These volatile molecules cruise around your body, trying to stabilize themselves by stealing electrons from other molecules. When they succeed, they create still more free radicals, causing a sort of snowballing procession of damage.

Free radicals don't just occasionally pop up here and there. Up to 5% of the oxygen that each cell uses is converted into free radicals.

Ionising radiation is a potent generator of reactive oxygen species, while tobacco smoke has been found to increase the DNA damage by 35-50%. Other well-known causes include:

many polluting chemicals, including the hydrocarbons from petroleum, many pesticides, the chlorine in town water supplies; iron in access of the body's needs: amines and nutrates.

It is a surprise to see iron, as being one of the essential nutrients, on the 'bad list', yet the effects of excess iron are so significant, that the increased incidence of testicular cancer this century has been attributed to the increasing iron content of the Western diet.

Can our body defend itself against oxidative damage by excessive free radicals?

The answer is: yes! Our body is equipped with very powerful defenses against free radicals and this is largely through antioxidants, which are consumed in the diet or made within our body, and enzymes.

Balance is the key. If there are not enough antioxidants available to neutrolize the free radicals, oxidative stress develops.

The key antioxidants in the diet are the carotenoids, vitamin A ( which we consume or make from carotenoids), vitamin C, vitamin E and the trace minerals selenium and zinc.

The prominent enzymes that destroy free radicals are called: superoxide dismutase, glutathione (particular melatonin) and a host of other natural compounds, such as those occuring in grape seeds and skins (OPC's) and in the herb Ginkgo biloba.

Vitamin E has been extensively researched and there is strong evidence that it is beneficial at much higher intakes than the current RDA (Recommended Daily Allowances) of 15 IU ( International Units). Vitamin E is especially required to protect unsaturated fats against oxidation.

The least amount found to inhibit oxidation is 40 IU per day, with 60 IU/day the minimum to enhance immune response. The Optimal level is 450 IU/day. Up to 800 IU has been found to be beneficial.

The researchers suggest an intake of 135 - 150 IU/day.

To obtain this amount from food, we would need to consume daily almost a kilogram of almonds, or 150 grams of soya oil, or 55 grams of wheatgerm oil, each of which would be not only unpractical, but even a harmful quantity of food.

That's why it make sense to supplement our diet with high quality nutritional supplements (multiminerals and antioxidants) to ensure that the optimal levels are being met.



About the Author: Adrian Joele became interested in nutrition and weight management while he was an associate with a nutritional supplement company. Since 2008 he wrote several articles about nutrition and weight loss and achieved expert status with Ezine http://Articles.com. He has been involved in nutrition and weight management for more than 12 years and he likes to share his knowledge. Get his free report on nutrition and tips for healthy living, by visiting: http://www.nutrobalance2.net

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