Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Eating - Three High Protein Vegetables to Start Eating Today

Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Eating - Three High Protein Vegetables to Start Eating Today

Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Eating - Three High Protein Vegetables to Start Eating Today
By Beverleigh H Piepers

For most people, getting enough protein into their daily eating plan proves to be the biggest challenge they face, nutritionally speaking. Unless you are a lover of chicken breast or are diligently tracking your protein intake, there is a good chance you are currently not eating enough protein each day.

Fortunately, some vegetables will pack in more protein than many people realize. While they definitely will not give you the protein a juicy steak would, as far as vegetables go they do offer a good dose. Include these protein-packed vegetables in your daily eating plan, and you might just find it becomes easier than ever to get your needs met.

Here are three of the best vegetables to choose...

1. Edamame. Often regarded as a vegetarian-only food, do not neglect this vegetable. It packs in 10 grams of protein per cup and is super easy to prepare and eat. You can purchase this vegetable in steamer bags, making it easy just to pop them into the microwave, add a little salt and pepper, and then serve.

For something even tastier, try tossing them with a little of your favorite salad dressing before serving.

2. Corn. Few things are more delicious than fresh corn on the cob done on the BBQ. Corn is primarily a carbohydrate source, but this said, it will also give you a good dose of protein as well.

Corn packs in 8 grams of protein per half cup serving, so not to be ignored. If you combine corn with some black beans, which makes for a great combination, the beans will also provide you with a great dose of protein as well, and this can help to make a complete meal.

If you cannot find corn on the cob, canned corn works as well. Just avoid creamed corn as it has other ingredients added and is higher in fat and sugar.

3. Kale. Next up on the list is kale, which packs in 6 grams of protein per two cup serving. Kale is often regarded as one of the best superfoods you can be eating thanks to the high variety of vitamins and minerals it contains.

Serve it raw, cooked, or blended into a protein smoothie. Any which way you prefer; you will be doing your body good.

Keep these vegetables in mind and make sure you are not overlooking them. Remember there are other places you can get your protein from part from animal-based sources.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

For nearly 25 years, Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body. Go to http://DrugFreeType2Diabetes.com to learn about some of those secrets.

The answer isn't in the endless volumes of available information but in yourself.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Beverleigh_H_Piepers/123142
http://EzineArticles.com/?Type-2-Diabetes-and-Healthy-Eating---Three-High-Protein-Vegetables-to-Start-Eating-Today&id=9793368


Anti-Aging Foods

Anti-Aging Foods

Anti-Aging Foods
By Andy Gibson

How old are you? No, we don't mean how many birthdays have you celebrated. That's your chronological age. But how good is the pacing of your heart, the density of your bones, the agility of your mind? Their status will tell us your biological age. Some people are chronologically 40, but biologically 60, while others are chronologically 60, but biologically 40.

It's your biological age that matters. When you're biologically fit, you can throw away the calendar, for your motor is humming well and there's life in your years!

Biological age, says Dr. James Fries, professor of medicine at Stanford University, is a measure of how much "organ reserve" one possesses. Organ reserve is defined as the amount of functional ability one has available in response to a stressor in the form of an illness, accident or major life trauma. As we grow older, we generally lose organ reserve. Our immune, endocrine, and nervous systems are altered. Not only are we at greater risk of contracting infectious diseases, but we are also more susceptible to auto-immune diseases such as arthritis.

In the 1950s, Dr. Denham Harmon, from the University Of Nebraska School Of Medicine, proposed that many losses of function associated with aging are due to what he termed "free-radical damage." Free radicals are highly reactive chemical substances produced in the body, not only as a consequence of exposure to pollution, drugs, and chemicals but also as a result of natural metabolic activities. Harmon proposed that accelerated free-radical reactions may act as molecular time bombs that destroy the body's cells and result in the loss of organ reserve.

Research indicates that increased free-radical damage is associated with diseases that cause death in the elderly, including coronary heart disease and heart attack, certain forms of cancer and adult-onset diabetes.

Fortunately, our bodies are equipped with a mechanism - the antioxidant defense system - that helps protect against free-radical damage. Antioxidants are specific substances found in all cells that defuse free radicals before they have a chance to do serious damage to the body. They include vitamin E, beta carotene, vitamin C, and a variety of essential nutritional minerals, such as zinc, copper, and selenium.

Vitamin E is one of the superheroes when it comes to battling free radicals. Because it is a fat-soluble vitamin, it is attracted to cell membranes which have large amounts of fatty acids. Vitamin E prevents the oxidation of these fats by itself oxidizing and absorbing the free radicals.

Food sources of this vitamin include nuts, wheat germ, and sunflower seeds.

Vitamin C: Unlike Vitamin E, which works from the outside of cells, C does its antioxidizing job inside the cell, in its fluid (C is a water-soluble vitamin).

Food sources include: citrus fruits, amla (Indian gooseberry), strawberries, guavas and tomatoes.

Beta-carotene: Richly found in yellow-orange fruits and vegetables like mangoes, papayas, cantaloupes and carrots, beta-carotene converts to Vitamin A in the body. It is believed to be particularly effective against a highly toxic free radical called singlet oxygen.

Selenium: This trace mineral fights free radicals indirectly - by producing an enzyme which turns peroxides into harmless water. Best food sources are grains, fish, cabbage, celery and cucumber.

Zinc: another trace mineral, but this one works its effect in two ways: One, it acts as an antioxidant on its own; two, it forms part of an enzyme which protects cells against free radicals.

Good natural sources are liver, beef and nuts.

EAT RIGHT - STAY WELL!

Some of the major health-slackers and age-speeders (heart disease, osteoporosis) are often the result of faulty eating. In many cases you can reduce your disease risks as soon as you adopt good nutrition habits - even if you begin at 60.

REDUCE FATS: A high intake of fats is associated with obesity which, in turn, is connected with the onset of diseases like high blood pressure heart ailments, gall bladder problems, adult-onset diabetes and even certain forms of cancer.

You can safely reduce fats to 20 per cent of daily calories - 30 per cent is the outer limit. Of the three types of fats, saturated fats (from animal products and from vegetable sources like palm and coconut oils) are associated with the build-up of cholesterol. Monounsaturated fats (from ground nuts oil, nuts such as almond, cashews, peanuts, etc.), and polyunsaturated fats (from safflower oil sunflower oil, etc.) appear to have a cholesterol-lowering effect.

Animal fats also carry the added danger of cholesterol. One egg yolk, for instance, contains about 240 mg, which is more than most of us should consume in a whole day.

On the other hand, all fats are breeding grounds for free radicals. And the unsaturated fats are more likely to react with oxygen when cooked and form free radicals than the saturated fats. So, the bottomline is: limit all fat consumption. Try the following food swaps:

  • Substitute skim milk for whole.
  • Substitute egg whites for yolks, in omelets and other dishes.
  • If you can't stomach the idea of being a pure vegetarian, substitute skinless chicken and fish for fat-marbled red meats, sausages and cold cuts.

Also, steam, bake or eat foods raw whenever you can. If you must fry, opt for stir-frying with minimal oil in a non-stick skillet, instead of deep frying.

BONE UP ON CALCIUM:

How well you "stand up" to aging is very largely a matter of how adequate your intake of calcium has been. If you've not been getting enough, bone loss can begin in the mid-30's, in women even as early as puberty. The result: osteoporosis, that brittle bone disease that hits elderly people.

Many people don't get enough calcium in their diet (especially hard-core vegetarians who don't even take milk/dairy products). Your daily requirement: 800-1000mg. Good calcium sources are: milk and milk products; fish like sardines (where you can chew on those tiny, edible, calcium-rich bones); green leafy vegetables. But the calcium from plant sources is not as well absorbed as that from animal sources.

Also, unfortunately, aging itself blunts calcium absorption. Certain foods like coffee, tea, colas and chocolates (all of which contain caffeine) as well as tobacco, if taken at the same time as calcium, can inhibit its absorption. So do phosphorus-rich drinks like sodas.

Remember, also, that your body requires Vitamin D for the intestinal absorption of calcium. If your diet is deficient in this vitamin, you can get some of your needs from sunlight. Food sources include: liver, egg yolk, milk, butter.

WHAT ELSE...

In the run-up to a healthy old age, there are a few other things you must do:

  1. Limit salt intake to about one teaspoon a day. Excess salt consumption carries the risk of high blood pressure and its potentially fatal consequences: heart disease, stroke, kidney disease.
  2. Avoid heavy alcohol consumption. It is associated with liver damage and increased cancer risk.
  3. Give up smoking. It can cause a whole range of illness, from chronic respiratory ailments like emphysema to cancers of the lung, mouth and esophagus.

My firm belief is: "Finding a cause leads the way to find a cure". So, it is basically important to understand everything from its deepest core. And the best way to do so is: Keep on reading to develop and deepen your understanding on health and wellness at GrowTaller4IdiotsDS.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Andy_Gibson/2325820
http://EzineArticles.com/?Anti-Aging-Foods&id=9755166


Type 2 Diabetes - Link Between Nonalcoholic Liver Disease and Peripheral Vascular Conditions

Type 2 Diabetes - Link Between Nonalcoholic Liver Disease and Peripheral Vascular Conditions

Type 2 Diabetes - Link Between Nonalcoholic Liver Disease and Peripheral Vascular Conditions
By Beverleigh H Piepers

Type 2 diabetes is a known risk factor for both nonalcoholic liver disease and peripheral vascular conditions. Scientists at Qingdao University and other research facilities in China have found a link between both conditions.

In July of 2017, the Internal Medicine Journal reported on a study of two thousand six hundred and forty-six participants who had been previously diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. They were all at least 40 years of age. Those who had nonalcoholic fatty liver disease were at a high risk for peripheral vascular conditions. A total of 12.8 percent of the participants with the liver condition also had vascular conditions, compared with 7.8 percent of the participants without liver disease. When all other factors were taken into account, the difference was shown to be slightly significant. C-reactive protein, an indicator of inflammation, and measurements of defective metabolism were also higher in those with peripheral artery disease (PAD).

From the above information, the researchers concluded nonalcoholic fatty liver disease was partly to blame. Metabolic risk factors and inflammation were other risk factors. The complications of Type 2 diabetes appear to be related to the other risk factors. Keeping blood sugar levels and body weight under control is important to every body system. The early stages of Type 2 diabetes are not painful but prevention of the complications can prevent the pain of...

  • peripheral artery disease,
  • heart attacks, and
  • strokes.

Peripheral vascular conditions frequently go undiagnosed. If ignored these conditions can lead to gangrene and amputation.

  • gangrene develops from poor circulation.
  • when the limbs do not get sufficient oxygen and nutrients, tissue can die.
  • dead tissue can become infected.
  • if antibiotics do not resolve the infection, then amputation becomes the next step in treatment.

Peripheral vascular conditions are the most common reasons for amputation.

If tingling and numbness occur in your hands or feet, then be sure to have them checked out, diagnosed and treated. Peripheral vascular conditions can be treated with medication and with regular walking (feet). Ways of preventing or treating peripheral artery disease...

  • keeping your blood sugar below 100 mg/dL (5.5 mmol/L) fasting,
  • not smoking,
  • taking blood pressure medication when it is indicated by your doctor,
  • taking cholesterol-lowering medication regularly when prescribed,
  • taking medications to improve blood circulation - Plavix (clopidogrel) or daily aspirin prescribed to prevent blood clots, Trental, Pentoxil (pentoxifylline) prescribed to improve blood circulation, Pletal (cidistoprel) prescribed to improve circulation.
  • surgery to replace damaged blood vessels with artificially-made tubes.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

For nearly 25 years, Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body. Go to http://DrugFreeType2Diabetes.com to learn about some of those secrets.

The answer isn't in the endless volumes of available information but in yourself.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Beverleigh_H_Piepers/123142
http://EzineArticles.com/?Type-2-Diabetes---Link-Between-Nonalcoholic-Liver-Disease-and-Peripheral-Vascular-Conditions&id=9755403


Type 2 Diabetes - Preventing Critical Limb Ischemia in Diabetics

Type 2 Diabetes - Preventing Critical Limb Ischemia in Diabetics

Type 2 Diabetes - Preventing Critical Limb Ischemia in Diabetics
By Beverleigh H Piepers

Anyone who has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes is at risk for developing what is known as critical limb ischemia, a condition in which arteries supplying blood to the limbs form plaques inside their walls. When this happens not enough oxygen can reach the cells, and the cells develop ischemia, which can lead to cell death. Various medical people consider it an advanced form of peripheral artery disease (PAD), while others consider it a separate condition.

With enough dead cells in the limbs, the limbs are then subject to infection. The immune system is unable to fight infections effectively if blood flow is sluggish. Critical limb ischemia is not always diagnosed until serious problems such as gangrene, develop. Scientists at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Hubei, China, have found a molecule that could be used to diagnose critical limb ischemia before it progresses to a critical level. Their work was reported in September of 2017 by the journal Scientific Reports.

A molecule called Siglec-5 was found in cases where Type 2 diabetics had been diagnosed with ischemia. The molecule was seen in samples of plaque taken from the limbs of those with ischemia but not in the arteries of diabetic patients without plaque. The investigators concluded Siglec-5 levels could be used for the prevention of or treatment planning in critical limb ischemia.

In the United States, there are about 500 to 1000 cases of chronic limb ischemia diagnosed for every million people every year, with approximately 8 to 10 million cases existing at any one time. Worldwide statistics are unavailable.

The following can raise the risk of critical limb ischemia...

  • being aged over 60 or post menopausal,
  • being a smoker,
  • having Type 2 diabetes,
  • being overweight or obese,
  • leading a sedentary lifestyle,
  • having high cholesterol levels,
  • having high blood pressure readings,
  • a family history of blood vessel disease.

Anyone diagnosed with critical limb ischemia can have foot pain at rest. Muscle pain described as burning or cramping may be felt in the muscles and is relieved at rest. In more severe cases there can be ulceration or gangrene. The condition is diagnosed with a technique known as pulse volume recording or by ultrasound, a technique used to show blood flow, or lack thereof, throughout the legs and feet.

In mild cases, treatment can consist of...

  • controlling blood sugar levels,
  • taking medications to lower cholesterol levels,
  • reducing high blood pressure,
  • losing weight, and by
  • quitting smoking.

In other cases, angioplasty can be used. A tube with a small balloon may be inserted into the affected arteries. The balloon is inflated to aid in eliminating the plaque.

Surgery is another option. Jammed vessels may be replaced with artificial arteries.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

For nearly 25 years, Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body. Go to http://DrugFreeType2Diabetes.com to learn about some of those secrets.

The answer isn't in the endless volumes of available information but in yourself.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Beverleigh_H_Piepers/123142
http://EzineArticles.com/?Type-2-Diabetes---Preventing-Critical-Limb-Ischemia-in-Diabetics&id=9791826


Resistance Training Workout Routines

Resistance Training Workout Routines

Submitted by: Dr. Al Parker

What Is Resistance Training?

Resistance training involves activities that use weights, machines, resistance bands or even body weight to work your muscles properly. It is also known as strength training. This can be extremely helpful in achieving a healthier body. This kind of training we usually associate with athletes who have to build up their bodies to perform better. Most people would think that when resistance training is done, the body will grow bigger. Actually it does not have to. Resistance training is simply about increasing the strength of the body, not always it's size. Although we traditionally think that strength training traditionally for athletes, it can be use by anyone successfully if done correctly. Reistance training basically strengthens the muscles, and leans the bodies fat stores. It can be used by any age group to acheive specific results.

How Does Resistance Training Work?

A resistance training program will include the use of various exercise equipment and machines like the bench press, dumbbell or barbell. However, the easiest and most convienent way to train with resistance for most of us with busy lives is by using resistance bands at home. When the equipment is used, the muscles of the body will be pitted against the resistance. The cells of the body will then adapt to the extra resistance. This will then result to enlarge and increase the strength of each muscle cell to help in the muscle perform contractions more efficiently. Before doing any resistance training, it is ,of course, best to consult with a doctor. This goes especially for people who have medical conditions such as heart disease, lung disease diabetes, kidney or liver disease. You should know the proper tools and proper exercises for the needs of your body. Of course, that's whatwww.plantoberipped.com is here for. We can give you a personalized assessment of what type of resistance training program is right for you.

One of the best things about resistance training is that it can be done with little to no expensive equipement and does not require a large amount of space. Doing push-ups is one good example. You can do it just about anywhere where there is enough space for you to move. This time it is your own body weight that will be pitted against the muscles. So those who are a bit constrained in the budget can still do resistance trainings.

What Are the Benefits of Resistance Training?

1. Increase Bone Mineral Density-

Bones are constantly remodeling, meaning the tissues break down at the same time they build up. The peak of remodeling takes place during puberty. However, as a person ages, our bone mineral density decreases as the remodeling is not as active anymore. This is especially a problem to post-menopausal women and the elderly, but does begin to happen in the early thirties. Bone mineral density is usually supported by the hormones and stress placed on the bones. To address the problem of not having the hormones and less stress, and to maintain the bone mineral density, physical activity is the next best option. Resistance training is one physical activity that can put enough stress on the bones to stimulate remodeling and increase bone density.

2. Increase Strength-

In addition to increase in bone density and strength, muscles will grow stronger and become more developed as you progress.

3. Increase the Range of Activities-

When your body is strong enough to carry some considerable weight, then you will also be capable of doing more strenuous activities. An increase in exercise lifts the mood and you will be more interested in life and a more active lifestyle. This will really create a snowball effect on your life and activities.

4. Reduce the Body Fat-

Using and increasing the muscle mass (even a little bit) will increase the energy that is required by your body, even at rest. This also increases the energy needed by your body at during activities. The more muscle, the more energy is needed to be broken down to supply you body to function properly. This translates to more fat calories and fat being burned each minute. Thus with the decrease in body fat, you can expect the tone of the body to improve and you will become leaner....and did I mention sexy??

5. Improve State of the Elders-

For the elderly undergoing a resistance training program will help improve their health and decrease the risks brought about by the age. They can be more independent, without needing to rely on other people for doing simple things. Being able to do so will also decrease the risk of injuries in the elders

6. Improve Heart Condition-

Regular resistance training can result in a lowered heart rate and lowered blood pressure, especially after exercise. Thus, the risk of heart diseases is reduced.

This kind of training however must be properly done. It requires commitment and consistency. It will have to be done in a regular basis.

This is the real challenge when it comes to exercise and improving your health is consistency It's not hard to exercise for 30 minutes, but its difficult to consistently do this 5 days a week for 3 or 4 months. That is why you will need comprehensive plans like www.super-fit.com provides. What is super-fit.com you ask? Well, it's not yet released, but it is a website that will automate all of your boring fitness tasks. Such as finding new and exciting workouts (even with video download), calculating your calories, and finding tasty recipes.

The best part about this site is that they don't just give you a list of exercises to do and send you on your way. They provide every aspect of help that is required to get results. Workouts, nutrition, motivation, recipes, peer chatting and forums, and even access to expert advice. The key here is to simply take your time. Do things one step at a time correctly. As your body condition improves, then move on to more challenging tasks. The strength of the body and your health are very easy to improve with the right tools. Don't work hard, work smart!

About the Author: Dr. Parker is a surgical resident with a special interest in nutrition, fitness and the improvement of overall health. He has helped many people, patients and non-patients, acheive their fitness goals using little to no equipment and the most time effiecient workout routines possible. If you would like more information on his fitness program, go to: http://www.plantoberipped.com

Source: www.isnare.com
Permanent Link: http://www.isnare.com/?aid=111240&ca=Wellness%2C+Fitness+and+Diet


Type 2 Diabetes - Be A Tortoise, Not A Hare, to Help Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Type 2 Diabetes - Be A Tortoise, Not A Hare, to Help Reduce Your Diabetes Risk
By Beverleigh H Piepers

The hare is quick. Like rabbits, they are fast-moving creatures. Tortoises, on the other hand, are anything but quick. Similar to sloths, no matter how hard they try there is a limit to how fast they can move. Now if we suggest you should move like a tortoise and not a hare when it comes to making changes to your lifestyle, you might get the impression we are advocating sluggishness over quickness. That is not the case. The difference comes down to efficiency.

In simple terms, trying to change too much too quickly is a risk you should not take. Changing your lifestyle to improve your health and body weight requires sustainable changes. Rarely is something great achieved in a hurry and also be sustainable. Implementing slow and gradual changes are in your favor because they create progress you can maintain. It is a more efficient way to build momentum and, in turn, will ultimately bring you greater results.

Let us examine this idea from a fat loss perspective. To lose weight, you know you have to make changes to your eating plan. It also helps if you work out because exercising is a useful tool, and it should be a staple in your lifestyle anyway. Be proud of yourself if you have started to make changes to your diet. If you have begun making exercise a habit, know you are on the right track.

Even with these significant steps forward, be careful with how aggressively you strive to change. Remember it is gradual changes that prove to be most effective in the long run. Do not overextend yourself. A common mistake is suddenly ramping up the intensity and volume of an exercise program. Many people start to get into an exercise routine for the first time in years and realize how great it feels. Since results are just around the corner, they begin to exert themselves more, and more. It soon becomes too much, because willpower has its limits. When you impose an excessive burden on yourself, fatigue sets in and it is just a matter of time before burnout results. Going to extremes ends up being the reason why many people abandon their goals.

Sometimes, less is more: this is why you should think like the tortoise. Slow and steady determination wins the race. There is such a thing as being overzealous, and it tends to prove costly. Besides, if you commit to gradual changes to both your diet and physical activity, you will develop habits that will stick. On its own, this would be a victory because there is nothing more compelling than yielding long-term results that start out halting any upward weight creep and ends up with you reducing your weight by fifteen pounds that will lower your Type 2 diabetes risk by almost 60 percent. And most people find the longer they keep their weight off the easier it becomes and the new habits become more firmly ingrained.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

For nearly 25 years, Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body. Go to http://DrugFreeType2Diabetes.com to learn about some of those secrets.

The answer isn't in the endless volumes of available information but in yourself.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Beverleigh_H_Piepers/123142
http://EzineArticles.com/?Type-2-Diabetes---Be-A-Tortoise,-Not-A-Hare,-to-Help-Reduce-Your-Diabetes-Risk&id=9753252


The Amazing Flaxseed And Diabetes Natural Treatment Connection Revealed

The Amazing Flaxseed And Diabetes Natural Treatment Connection Revealed
By Terry Robbins

A simple seed, but so many benefits. If flaxseed is not part of your diet, you are missing out whether you have diabetes or not. For diabetics, there is an amazing connection between flaxseed and diabetes for those looking for a natural cure (type 2 diabetes) or a way to manage blood sugar levels naturally.

The many health benefits of flaxseed

Before cotton became affordable, flax (Linum usitatissimum) also known as linseed, has a fibrous stem which was woven into cloth and is still used in this way today despite the prevalence of cotton, but the oil which was produced from the flaxseed has been used medicinally for thousands of years. It wasn't until about a thousand years ago that people started eating flaxseed for health and well being. The health benefits of flaxseed include but are not limited to;

1. Cancer

Flaxseed contains the most amount of lignans when compared to other plants. The amount of lignans in flaxseed is about 7 times more than that in its closest competitor (sesame seeds) and as much as 3,200 more than peanuts.

Lignans contain very powerful antioxidants which are crucial for preventing the damaging effects of free radicals in the body. Free radicals are unstable oxygen molecules that in order to stabilize or "heal" themselves, "steal" particles from healthy cells but this only ends up creating more free radicals. The effects of free radicals on the body are thought to increase the risk of developing various chronic diseases and conditions including cancer.

Lignans are particularly beneficial for reducing the risk of breast cancer. Estrogen which is the female hormone can stimulate the growth of cancer but lignans in addition to antioxidant benefits also contain phyto(plant)estrogens, which mimic the action of the estrogen produced by the body but are less potent.

These chemically weaker phytoestrogens bind to estrogen receptors in the body and this helps to stop the effects on the body of the much stronger estrogen produced by the body which allows excessive amounts of this much stronger estrogen to be eliminated from the body which helps to reduce the risk of breast cancer.

Studies have shown that women who consumed lignan reduced their risk of developing breast cancer by about 62 percent when compared to women who did not consume lignan.

Lignans are also beneficial for fighting against prostate cancer as has been shown in various research studies.

Other cancer fighting properties of flaxseed emanate from the polyunsaturated fats including omega-3 fatty acids as well as fiber that it contains. These compounds in addition to lignans help to promote health and well-being and reduce the risk of developing various diseases including cancer. The anti-inflammatory properties of flaxseed also help to protect against cancer and many other chronic diseases.

2. Heart attack

Lignans not only provide antioxidant benefits but as mentioned previously are also a rich source omega-3 fatty acids of which alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is the main type and ALA is able to lower the risk of suffering a fatal heart attack.

3. Cholesterol

Flaxseed is also able to lower the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol which is dangerous and can lead to heart disease. Flaxseed is rich in a type of soluble fiber that is beneficial for the body which is known as mucilage. This mucilage is tied to the cholesterol lowering properties of flaxseed.

4. Kidney disease

Research has shown that the lignans and omega-3 fatty acids contained in flaxseed are able to reverse the damage to the kidneys caused by lupus which is an autoimmune disease.

5. Hot flushes

The lignans or phytoestrogens contained in flaxseed can be beneficial for women dealing with the various symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes. The estrogen levels of women going through menopause usually start to decrease and instead of going through hormone therapy, phytoestrogens are a natural alternative as they can be used to replace some of this estrogen that is no longer produced by the body because estrogen can help to reduce the severity of hot flashes and phytoestrogens can help with this.

Flaxseed and diabetes

Soluble fiber galore

The connection between flaxseed and diabetes is related to the mucilage that was discussed previously which is the soluble fiber that is available in high amounts in flaxseed. This soluble fiber has been shown by various studies to be able to reduce blood sugar levels which is important to not only manage diabetes but to also cure it naturally.

Diabetes results when the body does not produce any or enough of the hormone insulin or the insulin produced becomes inefficient and/or ineffective (insulin resistance) leading to the accumulation of glucose or sugar in the blood. Insulin is supposed to remove this glucose from the blood and transfer it to the various cells in the body where it is used for fuel or energy for day to day activities.

When insulin is unable to perform its duties, this glucose accumulation in the blood can increase the risk of developing diabetes or leading to diabetes related complications (heart and kidney disease, limb amputations, diabetic coma, etc).

One aspect of managing diabetes naturally is by following a customized diabetic diet to help control the amount of glucose deposited into the blood.

This is what is so amazing about flaxseed and why it is so important for diabetes natural treatment. The soluble fiber in flaxseed helps to slow down digestion which means that the digestion of the carbs and sugars in the food that we eat and conversion of this into glucose to be deposited into the bloodstream will be slowed down which helps to prevent blood sugar spikes. This shows the importance of flaxseed for diabetes natural treatment.

If you are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, one of the ways of preventing you from developing type 2 diabetes is to increase your intake of this soluble fiber.

Weight loss

Another connection between flaxseed and diabetes is weight loss. Many people with diabetes especially those with type 2 diabetes are overweight. Getting your weight under control is an important aspect of natural diabetes treatment and this is another area that flaxseed can help.

In addition to soluble fiber, flaxseed also contains insoluble fiber (roughage). Both types of fiber are important for weight loss because they help you feel fuller faster and keep hunger pangs away for longer which can help you eat less and help with your weight loss goals. Overweight diabetics who are attempting to lose weight should always increase their fiber intake for the reasons discussed and flaxseed can help with this.

It is also important to remember that many people with type 2 diabetes also deal with high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, heart disease, etc, and as discussed previously, flaxseed can also help with these various health issues.

The connection shown above between flaxseed and diabetes makes this amazing seed crucial and an important part of any diabetic diet.

Getting the most

1. Flaxseed oil and diabetes

Flaxseed oil is produced from the seeds and many people skip out on the seeds and reach for the oil but you may want to think again. You may want to consider passing by the oil firstly because you will not get the all important fiber and secondly because while the oil may contain some health properties, most of the lignans, protein and minerals are found in the actual seeds and not the oil. Since you need fiber as a diabetic, pass on the oil and reach for the seeds instead.

Flaxseed oil is also easily perishable and must be stored in the refrigerator once opened.

2. Must be processed

Flaxseed is available in two varieties i.e. brown flax and golden flax (also known as yellow flax) which generally have similar nutritional compositions.

While some people love to sprinkle whole flaxseed on salads or fresh baked bread, the body cannot process whole flaxseeds. They will simply pass through the body undigested which means that you will not get the full benefits of flaxseed including soluble fiber.

Flaxseed must be processed but the ground flaxseed goes rancid very quickly so store it in the fridge but do not use after 30 days or so. While you can easily find ground flaxseed in grocery stores, it is not as fresh as freshly ground flaxseeds so think about getting a cheap spice or coffee grinder or other seed grinding tool so that you can grind two tablespoons or more of whole flaxseed and have it fresh to use each day to add to smoothies, oatmeal, sprinkled on hot or cold cereal, sprinkled on salads, etc.

While ground flaxseed (flaxseed meal) does not last more than 30 days or so when stored in the refrigerator, whole flaxseed can last 6 to 12 months or 1 to 2 years if stored in the refrigerator.

Safety precautions

Flaxseed is generally safe but it does contain a minute amount of cyanide which is not enough to harm an adult but could possibly harm a fetus or infant so avoid flaxseed if you are pregnant or nursing and do not give it to children under the age of two.

The minute amount of cyanide in flaxseed should not be harmful to most people if you only consume the recommended daily amount which is 2 to 3 tablespoons of ground flaxseed. It is also important to remember that there are usually very small amounts of cyanide that are constantly present in human tissue which are constantly being metabolized so the cyanide in flaxseed should not really be a cause for concern. Other plants such as cruciferous vegetables also contain small amounts of cyanide.

A tablespoon of flaxseed contains about 5 to 6 milligrams of cyanide but for cyanide to be dangerous to the human body, it would have to be in amounts of at least 1,000 milligrams.

Other precautions with flaxseed relate to allergic reactions. Some people may be allergic to flaxseed and if so, stop using it or reduce the dose.

Some people may also experience bloating and flatulence when they first start consuming flaxseed. If so, start with small amounts and gradually build up.

If you have diabetes, you should be eating flaxseed because of the amazing connection between flaxseed and diabetes [http://diabetestype1and2info.com/foods-that-cure-diabetes-the-top-vegetable-that-beats-all-other-vegetables/] natural treatment. For more tips and tricks on how to cure diabetes naturally, visit [http://diabetestype1and2info.com/foods-that-cure-diabetes-the-top-vegetable-that-beats-all-other-vegetables/] and discover the number one vegetable that fights diabetes.

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Cancer and Obesity: Do I Have Cancer?

Cancer and Obesity: Do I Have Cancer?
By Dr. Naresh Parajuli

Cancer and Obesity

Does obesity increase the risk of cancer?

Obesity

Obesity is measured in terms of body mass index (BMI).

BMI determines whether weight is in healthy range or is overweight or obese.

BMI = weight/height squared; For example, for a person weighing 80 kg and 170 m tall, BMI = 27.6

One is underweight if the BMI is less than 18.5

A person is said to have a healthy BMI if it is between 18.5 and 24.9

When BMI is between 25 to 29.9, it is defined as overweight

When the BMI is 30 or higher, the person is said to be obese.

How does obesity increase the risk of cancers?

Obesity increases the risk of cancer in a few ways:

  • Fat tissue in the body produces excess amounts of oestrogen. High levels of oestrogen increases the risk of breast, endometrial, bowel and some other cancers.
  • Obese people have high levels of insulin and insulin-like substances in their blood. These substances may promote the development of certain tumors.
  • Fat cells produce hormones called adipokines that may stimulate growth of certain cancers.
  • Obese people are said to have chronic low-level inflammation which is associated with increased risk of cancer.

What are the cancers associated with obesity?

Obesity is associated with increased risk of cancer of:

  • Esophagus
  • Thyroid
  • Colon and rectum
  • Kidney
  • Pancreas
  • Gallbladder
  • Breast (after menopause)
  • Uterus

What other diseases are associated with obesity?

Besides cancer, obesity is a major risk factor for many diseases including:

  • Diabetes
  • Heart diseases
  • High blood pressure
  • Arthritis
  • Sleep apnoea
  • Depression
  • Asthma
  • Gallbladder problems

How common is obesity?

Obesity has become an epidemic globally. According to World Health Organization (WHO):

  • Obesity has more than doubled since 1980 worldwide.
  • In 2014, more than 1.9 billion adults, 18 years and older, were overweight. Of these over 600 million were obese.
  • 39% of adults aged 18 years and over were overweight in 2014, and 13% were obese.

In the USA, about two-thirds of adults and nearly one-third of children are either overweight or obese.

Australia is today ranked as one of the fattest nations in the developed world. If weight gain continues at current levels, by 2025, close to 80% of all Australian adults and a third of all children will be overweight or obese (MODI).

If the obesity epidemic continues at the present state, despite the new advances in diagnosis and treatment of cancers, the number of cancer cases will increase significantly taking also into account the increasing life expectancy of people all over the world.

According to WHO, one-third of all cancer cases are preventable. The best way to prevent cancer is by adopting healthy lifestyle like eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy body weight, quitting smoking, and reducing/quitting alcohol.

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Heart Disease Kills Diabetics

Heart Disease Kills Diabetics
By Paul D Kennedy

About two-thirds of persons over 65 who die from diabetes have heart disease. In fact, the risk of dying from heart disease is several times higher among persons with diabetes compared to non-diabetics.

The Framingham Heart Study is a long-term continuous cardiovascular study of the residents of the Framingham, a town in Massachusetts in the USA. The study began in 1948 with 5,209 adult subjects and the grandchildren of the original subjects are now taking part. Much of our knowledge of heart disease and how it is affected by diet, exercise and various medicines first came to light during this ground-breaking trans-generational study.

Framingham was the first study to show that diabetics are more vulnerable to heart disease than non-diabetics, and that having multiple health issues increases the likelihood of heart disease. The health problems associated with heart disease include diabetes, being overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, smoking, and a family history of early heart disease.

The more risks factors a person has for heart disease, the greater the chance they will develop the disease. In addition, the probability of dying from heart disease is much greater for a diabetic. Thus while a person with one risk factor, such as high blood pressure, will have a particular chance of dying from heart disease, a person with diabetes has two to four times that risk of dying.

One medical study found that people with diabetes who had no other risk factors for heart disease were five times more likely to die of heart disease than non-diabetics. Another study indicated that diabetics were as likely to have a heart attack as non-diabetics who have already had heart attacks.

How diabetics get heart disease

The most common cause of heart disease in diabetics is atherosclerosis (hardening of the coronary arteries) due to a build-up of cholesterol in the blood vessels that supply the heart. This build-up usually begins before blood glucose levels increase noticeably. If you have abnormally high levels of cholesterol there is an 85% chance that you also have diabetes.

Cholesterol is a microscopic ingredient found in the membranes of animal cells, including humans. It holds the thin membranes of your body cells together; without cholesterol your body would collapse into a jelly-like heap. It also has a role in sending signals to your cells along your nerves. In addition, it is the raw material your body uses to make certain hormones, as well as vitamin D.

About 75 to 80% of your cholesterol is made by synthesising other substances inside your body. The rest comes from the animal products you eat. If you eat too much cholesterol, your body will reduce the amount of cholesterol it makes... provided your system is working properly. If not, you will end up with too much cholesterol.

Cholesterol is transported through the blood stream to where it is needed to build cells. Because it is insoluble, it has to be carried within lipoproteins, which are soluble in blood. These can be either low-density lipoproteins (LDL) or high density lipoproteins (HDL). The problem is LDL - when too many particles of cholesterol are being delivered by LDL, they tend to collide and become damaged.

These damaged particles cause plaques (raised bumps or small scars) to form on the walls of the arteries. These plaques are fragile. When a plaque ruptures, the blood around it starts to clot. To contain the rupture, the clot will grow. If the clot grows big enough, it will block the artery.

If an artery that carries blood to your heart becomes blocked, you'll have a heart attack. If the blood vessels in your feet get blocked, you'll end up with peripheral vascular disease. Once you have too much cholesterol in your blood you are on your way to angina, heart disease and stroke, and irreversible damage to the tiny blood vessels in your eyes and kidneys.

How diabetics can be treated for heart disease

Depending on its severity, heart disease in persons with diabetes can be treated in several ways. These include:

  • Aspirin therapy
  • Diet
  • Exercise
  • Medications
  • Surgery

Aspirin therapy

For type 2 diabetics who are aged over 40 and are at high-risk for heart disease and peripheral vascular disease, a daily low-dose of aspirin reduces the risks of the clots that lead to heart attacks and strokes.

Diet

A plant-focused diet such as the one that I recommend for treating diabetes will also help treat hard disease. This easy to follow diet means that you eat food that is... natural... low in sugar... low in fat... low in salt... high in fibre... with low GI values... which is mostly plants. You also need to avoid eggs and dairy products, and drink plenty of water.

This is not a vegetarian or vegan diet as you can still eat meat provided it is ultra-lean. However, early studies do indicate that a vegan diet may have a number of benefits for persons with heart disease but more research is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

Exercise

As well as helping you lose excess weight, regular exercise will improve your blood glucose levels, high blood pressure, cholesterol levels and to decrease abdominal fat, all of which are risk factors for heart disease.

Both aerobic and anaerobic exercises increase the mechanical efficiency of the heart. Aerobic exercise increases cardiac output (the volume of blood being pumped by the heart) and anaerobic strength training increases the thickness of your heart muscles.

The beneficial effects of exercise on the cardiovascular system have been well documented. A study that tracked physical activity among adults with type 2 diabetes over 19 years found that those who undertook at least four hours a week of moderate exercise were about 40% less likely to succumb to heart disease than sedentary people. They also cut their risk of getting a stroke.

Medications

Many medications are used to treat heart disease. Here's a sampling:

ACE inhibitors widen or dilate blood vessels to improve the amount of blood the heart pumps and to lower blood pressure. Angiotension II Receptor Blockers reduce chemicals that narrow the blood vessels, allowing blood to flow more easily.

Antiarrhythmics are used to treat abnormal heart rhythms resulting from irregular electrical activity of the heart. Blood thinners or anticoagulants, such as Warfarin, help prevent clots from forming in the blood. Antiplatelets prevent the formation of blood clots. Clot busters are used in thrombolytic therapy to break up blood clots.

Beta-blockers are one of the most widely used drugs for high blood pressure and are a mainstay in the treatment of congestive heart failure. Calcium channel blockers relax blood vessels and increase the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart while also reducing the heart's workload. Digoxin helps an injured or weakened heart work more efficiently to send blood through the body.

Diuretics help get rid of unneeded water (which makes it easier for the heart to pump) and salt (a cause of high blood pressure) through the urine. Nitrates are vasodilators used to treat angina in persons with coronary artery disease or chest pain caused by blocked blood vessels of the heart.

As you can see, most of these medications mitigate the various deleterious effects of heart disease. But they don't actually cure the disease. Once you start taking them you have to continue for the rest of your life.

Surgery

There are many surgical techniques for treating heart disease. These range from the insertion of simple stents to heart transplants.

Stents are small expandable tubes used to reinforce weakened arteries or to open up arteries that have been narrowed by the build-up of plaque. In heart-bypass surgery the problem of blocked coronary arteries is overcome by creating a new pathway to the heart for the blood. Heart-valve surgery is used to repair damaged valves in the heart.

People with abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmia) can be treated with cardioversion in which electrical signals are sent to the heart muscle to restore a normal rhythm which allows the heart to pump more effectively. A pacemaker is a small device that sends electrical impulses to the heart muscle to maintain a suitable heart rate and rhythm. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is an electronic device that constantly monitors the heart rate and rhythm and which, when it detects an abnormal rhythm, delivers energy to the heart muscle, causing the heart to beat in a normal rhythm again.

A Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) is a kind of mechanical heart that is placed inside a person's chest, where it helps the heart pump blood throughout the body. A heart transplant is the replacement of a diseased heart with a heart from a healthy donor who has died.

In the main, the purpose of surgery for heart disease is to rectify the underlying condition.

Summary

If you are diabetic, there is a strong probability that you have or will develop heart disease also. The most common cause of heart disease in diabetics is atherosclerosis and if you have cholesterol issues there is an 85% chance that you also have diabetes.

Heart disease can be treated with a combination of aspirin therapy, a plant-focused diet and exercise. There are many medicines for ameliorating the various deleterious effects of the disease. Surgical techniques to rectify the underlying condition range from the insertion of stents to heart transplants.

When you are diagnosed with diabetes, you will probably be checked for heart disease. The diet and exercise regime that will help you beat your diabetes should also be helpful in dealing with your heart disease.

Paul D Kennedy is a type 2 diabetic. He used his skills as an international consultant and researcher to find a way to control his diabetes using diet alone and, about five years ago, he stopped taking medications to control his blood glucose levels. You can find out more from beating-diabetes.com or by contacting Paul at paul@beating-diabetes.com. His book Beating Diabetes is available for download from Amazon or as a printed edition from Create Space online book store.

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Three Most Common Causes For Low Blood Pressure

Three Most Common Causes For Low Blood Pressure

Three Most Common Causes For Low Blood Pressure
By Dr. Dorothy Adamiak, ND

Poor circulation and low blood pressure is more common than generally believed. As health practitioners and patients keep focusing on hypertension, hypotension is usually overlooked or dismissed. Yet, many of us may be experiencing blood pressure dips without being aware of it.

Sporadic bouts of fatigue, chronic exhaustion, frequent yawning, daytime sleepiness, mental dullness, poor memory and even brittle nails all may be signs of insufficient circulation.

The causes of hypotension may vary from person to person and depend on genetic, environmental and circumstantial factors. However, many of those can be controlled, provided that the individual is aware of them. Here is a list of just three most common controllable causes for low blood pressure.

    • Dehydration: Experts say that one should drink 8 glasses of water a day, yet despite this straightforward advice we frequently end up below the guidelines. It is because many of us rely solely on the sense of thirst. Yet, thirst has been found to be consistently unreliable. It simply cannot be used as a hydration gauge.

 

    • Nutritional deficiency: Everyone knows that nutrition is a very important determinant of health. Heart cannot pump without energy and blood cannot flow without being propelled. For that you need nutrients, and lots of them. Yet, a multivitamin won`t do in this case as crucial macronutrients for blood flow must come from food, not from pills. Among the most vital circulatory macronutrients are: sugars, electrolytes, and protein. These three are responsible for increasing blood pressure.

 

  • Adrenal fatigue: Stress, worry, and grief are very hard on the body and if prolonged they may lead to adrenal fatigue or even adrenal exhaustion. Fatigued adrenals alter production of hormones and neurotransmitters which in turn cause changes in the blood flow. Adrenal fatigue is largely an under-recognized phenomenon, although its extreme form called Addison`s disease is a well-known to health practitioners reason for chronic hypotension.

The above conditions are three most common reasons for low blood pressure. Fortunately, they are also easily reversible, especially if one works with a qualified health care provider that is capable of detecting the causes, determining the needs, and also the one that will be assessing the progress.

Causes for hypotention however, are not limited only to dehydration, nutritional deficiencies, and adrenal fatigue. There are also other reasons. Among them are: hidden blood loss, anemia, nervous system failure, dysautonomia, food sensitivities, POTS, and others. Regardless of the underlying reasons follow these four simple circulatory boosters below, so you can experience an immediate improvement in your well-being:

    • Keep on drinking plenty of water and if possible drink it extra cold. Cold water has been shown to boost circulation to the same degree as coffee does.

 

    • Do not skip meals; low blood sugar that results from non-eating can contribute to hypotension

 

    • Add a pinch of salt to food; sodium lost during digestion and sweat must be replaced. Insufficient sodium contributes to low blood pressure and chronic fatigue

 

  • Adjust your diet to support adrenals; adrenals need large quantities of vitamin C. Add oranges, grapefruit, kiwis, and lemon to your diet to ensure a good supply of this nutrient.

To read about other reasons behind hypotension visit Dr D's blog http://goo.gl/8Xlhos

For a more comprehensive look, quick tips and permanent solutions to low and fluctuating blood pressure refer to The Guide, a comprehensive read on perfecting circulation: http://amzn.to/1PBZOx8

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