Food and Drink

The Best Way to Check the Temperature in Your Freezer!

Best Way to Check the Temperature in Your Freezer

The Best Way to Check the Temperature in Your Freezer!

By: Rick Kaestner

Data loggers are modern digital devices that document temperature. Many people use them to monitor the temperature in a freezer or in a pharmaceutical storage facility, but the are also used to monitor oven temperature and other manufacturing processes.

A high temperature data logger (a logger with sensors capable of measuring high temperatures) can be used in laboratories, manufacturing plants and even bakeries. Literally any place where temperature plays a role in producing a product or affects the life of stored inventory is a potential spot where a data logger can be employed.

Data loggers are priceless tools for museums and art galleries where they monitor and document temperature and humidity. Art works and paintings must be maintained in rigidly controlled environments or they deteriorate. They can also be employed for investigating building operational problems, checking voltage and amperage in energy lines and many, many more. The only thing that limits them is which sensors are installed.

Humidity monitors
Temperature/RH data loggers such as the ThermaViewer can be used to monitor and alert personnel if temperature moves outside a 'safe' range. Knowing the relative humidity (RH) is important in every place where there are any moisture sensitive goods stored. Cigars, musical instruments and clothes - all these goods may be damaged or even destroyed by rapid RH changes. Drums' heads can split, guitars can fall apart and paintings can darken - all because of improper RH level.

High temperature
High temperature sensors can increase the data loggers' usefulness. Wherever there are heaters or ovens to monitor, a high temperature data logger will be handy. They can be used for temperature monitoring of ongoing experiments in a lab as well as for checking the temperature in ironworks' furnace. Data loggers (even high temperature ones) are relatively inexpensive and can be used by small businesses, like pizzerias and bakeries.

 

Author Bio
Rick Kaestner is the President and CEO of Two Dimensional Instruments; the worldwide leader in providing technology to monitor, measure, record and document temperature and humidity. For more information please visit their website at www.e2di.com

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Steelhead Fishing in Pennsylvania

Steelhead Fishing in Pennsylvania

Steelhead Fishing in Pennsylvania

With the colder nights and that first frost brings forth the beginning of steelhead season in Pennsylvania. For many anglers the arrival of the steelhead in creeks like Walnut, Elk, and 20 Mile brings a sense of excitement that is unmatched by other forms of fishing in the state. Steelhead Salmon are an extremely powerful fish that can make the drag on a reel scream and push your rod to it's limits.

Now how do you go about fishing for these silver bullets? There are several techniques but the most common forms in Pennsylvania are fly fishing and drift fishing. In this article we'll go into detail on how to fish for steelhead in the Pennsylvania streams and what streams to fish in Pennsylvania.

Fly Fishing

First, lets talk about fly fishing and what type of gear you will need to have to tackle these fish. The following is a list of commonly used fly fishing equipment for fishing for steelhead in the PA streams.

Gear
Fly Rod = 7 to 8 weight rod from 9 to 10 foot
Fly Reel = Any fly reel with a good drag. Large arbor fly reels are preferred, they pick up the fly line a lot faster and tend to have a better drag system.
Fly Line = 7 to 9 weight forward floating fly line
Leader = Taper leader from 20 to 15 to 10 pound test leader material then connect 8 to 6 pound fluorocarbon as a tippet. If water is clear use 6 then 4 pound fluorocarbon as tippet.

Flies
Egg Patterns = Sucker Spawn, Blood Dots, Crystal Meth Flies, Estez Eggs
Sizes - 12, 14, 16 size nymph hooks 2X strong or 8 or 10 live bait (egg hook)
Streamers = Egg Sucking Leech, Wooly Buggers, Crystal Buggers
Sizes - 2, 4, 8, 10 salmon hooks or streamer hooks
Nymphs = Stone Flies, Prince Nymphs, Hairs Ears Nymphs
Sizes - 10, 12, 14 size nymph hooks 2X strong

Fly Fishing Techniques

Dead drifting with an indicator - To dead drift with a indicator simply put on a indicator or small trout bobber about 6 foot up the leader then attach some weight 2 BB sinkers or 1 3/0 sinker about a foot above the fly. You will need to move your indicator up and down your leader to find the depth of the water. To get a true dead drift your indicator should stand straight up and down and not have the appearance of dragging the bottom. (This is easier said then done; there are all types of indicators to help with getting a true dead drift)

Dead Drifting without an indicator - This is my favorite way to fish for steelhead! I use this method on the larger streams of Pennsylvania and New York with great success and you can't beat the strike you get when a steelhead slams your fly while it is swinging or at the end of the drift. You can use this technique whether you are fishing egg patterns, streamers, or nymphs and is extremely versatile in any type of water depth or current.
First, You need to have a leader and tippet any where from 10 to 15 feet depending on the size of the creek you are fishing. If fishing Elk Creek or Walnut creek in Erie, PA you will want to keep your leader around 10 to 11 feet. Next, depending on the depth of the water you want to put a sinker any where from 3 feet to 6 feet up your line. The sinker should be a single 3/0, 7, or 5 depending on the depth and speed of the water. Finally, you should cast your fly upstream at about 1 to 2 o'clock then mend your line upstream immediately then get your fly rod high in the air then let it drift and then swing through to the end of the drift. Don't pull the fly out of the water to quickly to cast again let it hang for a few seconds. Some of the most incredible hits are at the end of the drift. If you prefect this technique you will have some of the most fun days you have ever had fishing for steelhead.

Spin Fishing with a Drift Rod

One of the most effective techniques of fishing the tributaries of Lake Erie is fishing with bait and a dead drift rod. I have seen more fish caught on skein, egg sacs, and minnows than any other technique. Fishing with bait you can consistently catch steelhead and 20 plus fish days are not uncommon when the fish are running.

Gear

Rod
8 ½ to 12 foot spinning rod or 11 to 15 foot Canadian style drift rod. (Canadian style drift rod requires a center pin reel)ReelSpinning - Good spinning reel with a front drag that generally holds 140 yds of 8lb test is standard.Center Pin - Okuma makes a affordable center pin reel that will allow you to get started with this method. Some Center Pin reels will empty your pocket book.Line4 to 8 lb fluorocarbonIndicator / BobberSteelhead style drift bobber (Blackbird and Drennan make excellent floats)

Hooks
Size 4 Salmon or Steelhead hook will work for most circumstances, or a size 8 octopus style.
Split Shot .You will need a variety of split shot from BB to 5's depending on depth and current

Bait
Egg Sacs, Skein, Single Salmon Eggs, Minnows, Shiners, and Worms

How to Rig
First put your drift bobber on first, generally you float will be anywhere from 4 feet to 7 feet depending on depth from your bait. Next stagger your split shots about 12 inches above your bait to 15 inches above your bait. Space your split shots anywhere from 2 to 2 inches apart. Next, tie on a salmon hook or octopus style hook. If fishing skein or egg sacs, use a size 4 hook to hold the skein on the hook. If you are fishing clear water and using single eggs use a 12 to 14 size hook.

Where to fish

Elk Creek - Is the largest creek of the Erie PA streams, I would have to say that I prefer Elk creek to all the other creeks because of it's size and the ability to do some hiking to in the woods to find a place to fish. There are many well-known holes on Elk Creek, including the mouth Elk Creek Access Area, the Legion Hole, and the Conrail Tubes on the lower sections of the creek and Foley's End and Streuchen Flats on the upper end of the creek. At the beginning of the season focus your attention on the lower sections of the creek due to fish not being able to make it to the upper sections. Then in the spring focus on the upper sections where the steelhead will spawn.

Walnut Creek - Is the second largest creek in the Erie PA region most if not all the fishing at Walnut Creek is done at or just above the Walnut Creek Marina. This creek is full of steelhead and fishermen! It is a small stream that runs right beside the parking lot of Walnut Creek Marina and is a great place to take kids and is accessible for all people.

Twenty Mile - Is the largest of the Eastern mile streams to fish Twenty mile you will need to park along route 5 and walk to mouth. Fishing at Twenty Mile can be great when Walnut and Elk creeks are to high and muddy to fish.
Route 5 Streams - There a number of small streams that you can access by using route 5 as your guide these streams include Raccoon, Godfrey, Trout, Cascade, Four Mile, Seven Mile, Twelve Mile, and Sixteen Mile.

In conclusion, steelhead fishing is one of the most exciting fishing opportunities we have in Pennsylvania plus you have the opportunity to catch a fish that often goes over 10 pounds and fights like no other species of fish known to Pennsylvania waters. My only warning to all those thinking of going steelhead fishing is be prepared to catch the bug then spend endless hours thinking, tying flies, preparing bait and for the next chance to land that silver bullet.

Author Bio
Owner of Penns Ads www.pennsads.com/community which is a community guide for all of central Pennsylvania.

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The Beneficial Side of Desserts

The Beneficial Side of Desserts

The Beneficial Side of Desserts
By Stephen G John

Eating dessert is done more for cultural reasons rather than as a necessary part of a meal. It signifies completion of a meal and gives you a sense of satisfaction. But a good dessert shouldn't only be intended to make you feel good - it should be beneficial as well.

Here are some benefits of having a good dessert:

1. It helps facilitate digestion.
2. It provides additional nutrients to your diet.
3. The added vitamins work to increase your resistance to infections.
4. The "feel good" factor of a good dessert helps to reduce stress.
5. It helps to reduce the bad cholesterol levels while increasing the good cholesterol in your body.

How to Prepare a Healthy Dessert

It's quite easy to prepare a healthy dessert. You only need to include nutritious ingredients that are low in fat to produce one. Here are some ways to prepare a dessert that's not only tasty but healthy as well:

1. Include fruits

Fruits are loaded with vitamins, minerals and fiber that your body needs for strength, vitality and resistance to sicknesses. You should include them in your dessert recipe. Apples, bananas, papayas and fresh berries are some fruits that you must consider to make a flavorful, nourishing dessert.

2. Avoid using ingredients that are high in fat.

Fat is one of the greatest causes of obesity and a lot of degenerative diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure and heart ailment. You should avoid using it as an ingredient in making dessert.

You can do it by substituting heavy cream with low-fat cream or low-fat cottage cheese.

3. Add chocolate to your ingredients.

Chocolate contains antioxidants that work to strengthen your immune system. It also contains substances that help to improve your mood. You may also use unsweetened cocoa or chocolate protein powder as healthy substitutes for chocolate.

4. Use yoghurt in your dessert.

Yoghurt is a healthy ingredient because it helps your body absorb calcium and vitamin B more efficiently. It also works to boost the immune system and improves digestion. Another beneficial attribute of yoghurt is its ability to lower bad cholesterol levels in the body.

5. Use soymilk.

If you are fond of making desserts that contain milk such as smoothies and shakes, use soy milk. Soymilk contains flavonoids that help to keep your blood vessels healthy. This will lead to normal blood pressure and protection from heart problems.

If you love to eat desserts as a regular part of your meals, you should make it nutritious so that it can give you an added benefit aside from feeling good and satisfied.

Feel free to see delicious dessert recipes at Foodplus delicious desserts section.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Stephen_G_John/1361639
http://EzineArticles.com/?The-Beneficial-Side-of-Desserts&id=8513144


10 Most Common Ways to Cook Chicken

10 Most Common Ways to Cook Chicken

10 Most Common Ways to Cook Chicken
By Stephen G John

Chicken is one of the most common and popular foods on earth. There's an abundance of chicken in a majority of markets in many places around the world. It's being famous as an international food makes the chicken the subject of many cooking styles and approaches.

We have been eating chicken all our lives, but it didn't come to us how this tasty meat can adapt to different cooking methods.

To satisfy our curiosity, here are some of the most common ways to cook chicken:

1. Shallow-Frying

One of the most popular methods, shallow-frying cooks the chicken by soaking it in about one inch of oil. The chicken is allowed to cook, and as the first side is done, the meat is turned over to cook the other side.

2. Braising

Braising involves the cooking of large cuts of chicken by partially soaking it with liquid such as broth, cider, or wine. The cooking is done gradually and at low temperature. This results in a very tender, delicious meat.

3. Grilling

Grilling is done by cooking chicken meat over direct heat. It is the fastest method that is applicable to all cuts of meat. Even whole chicken can be grilled provided it is opened at the middle. Grilled chicken tastes the best when it is marinated before cooking and brushed with cooking oil or something that can add flavor to it.

4. Poaching

This method involves simmering the chicken in liquid until it is fully cooked. This method is typically used for making chicken broth for chicken soup or preparing the meat for low fat and low calorie dishes.

5. Spatchcock

In spatchcock cooking, the cook opens the chicken and removes the spine, the breast bone and the tips of the wings. This makes the chicken ready for roasting or grilling. Spatchcocking is usually intended to make the chicken cook in half the time than cooking it with its bones on.

6. Deep Frying

Deep-frying is a method that cooks the chicken by immersing it fully in cooking oil. This method cooks the meat quickly, especially if the cook uses a large pot to contain the meat and the oil.

7. Baking

Baking involves cooking the chicken in an oven at a temperature of between 350 - 375 degrees Fahrenheit. The cook then rubs the chicken with herbs and seasonings to make it more delicious and aromatic.

8. Stir-Frying

Stir-frying is method of cooking that is very popular in East Asia. It involves the removal of the skin and bones and the meat is fried in high temperature.

9. Sauteing

In sauteing, the chicken is chopped into small pieces and cooked thoroughly. After this, the cook adds sauce or broth into the chicken, and the entire dish is allowed to cook.

10. Stewing

Stewing is the most ideal method of cooking for dark meat chicken. Some cooks sear the meat before stewing, but this method is optional. Then he adds liquid to the pot and leaves the meat to cook at low temperature. You can actually stew chicken without having to sear it.

Stephen John is a food and wine enthusiast. He blogs about food, wine, and culture and writes wine reviews for a living. He loves to travel and try exotic cuisines of different countries. His love for good food has led him to Foodplus which made learn many things about cooking good food. Visit Foodplus website and discover why Stephen loves it.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Stephen_G_John/1361639
http://EzineArticles.com/?10-Most-Common-Ways-to-Cook-Chicken&id=7836838


Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Eating - Three High Protein Vegetables to Start Eating Today

Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Eating - Three High Protein Vegetables to Start Eating Today

Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Eating - Three High Protein Vegetables to Start Eating Today
By Beverleigh H Piepers

For most people, getting enough protein into their daily eating plan proves to be the biggest challenge they face, nutritionally speaking. Unless you are a lover of chicken breast or are diligently tracking your protein intake, there is a good chance you are currently not eating enough protein each day.

Fortunately, some vegetables will pack in more protein than many people realize. While they definitely will not give you the protein a juicy steak would, as far as vegetables go they do offer a good dose. Include these protein-packed vegetables in your daily eating plan, and you might just find it becomes easier than ever to get your needs met.

Here are three of the best vegetables to choose...

1. Edamame. Often regarded as a vegetarian-only food, do not neglect this vegetable. It packs in 10 grams of protein per cup and is super easy to prepare and eat. You can purchase this vegetable in steamer bags, making it easy just to pop them into the microwave, add a little salt and pepper, and then serve.

For something even tastier, try tossing them with a little of your favorite salad dressing before serving.

2. Corn. Few things are more delicious than fresh corn on the cob done on the BBQ. Corn is primarily a carbohydrate source, but this said, it will also give you a good dose of protein as well.

Corn packs in 8 grams of protein per half cup serving, so not to be ignored. If you combine corn with some black beans, which makes for a great combination, the beans will also provide you with a great dose of protein as well, and this can help to make a complete meal.

If you cannot find corn on the cob, canned corn works as well. Just avoid creamed corn as it has other ingredients added and is higher in fat and sugar.

3. Kale. Next up on the list is kale, which packs in 6 grams of protein per two cup serving. Kale is often regarded as one of the best superfoods you can be eating thanks to the high variety of vitamins and minerals it contains.

Serve it raw, cooked, or blended into a protein smoothie. Any which way you prefer; you will be doing your body good.

Keep these vegetables in mind and make sure you are not overlooking them. Remember there are other places you can get your protein from part from animal-based sources.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

For nearly 25 years, Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body. Go to http://DrugFreeType2Diabetes.com to learn about some of those secrets.

The answer isn't in the endless volumes of available information but in yourself.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Beverleigh_H_Piepers/123142
http://EzineArticles.com/?Type-2-Diabetes-and-Healthy-Eating---Three-High-Protein-Vegetables-to-Start-Eating-Today&id=9793368


Anti-Aging Foods

Anti-Aging Foods

Anti-Aging Foods
By Andy Gibson

How old are you? No, we don't mean how many birthdays have you celebrated. That's your chronological age. But how good is the pacing of your heart, the density of your bones, the agility of your mind? Their status will tell us your biological age. Some people are chronologically 40, but biologically 60, while others are chronologically 60, but biologically 40.

It's your biological age that matters. When you're biologically fit, you can throw away the calendar, for your motor is humming well and there's life in your years!

Biological age, says Dr. James Fries, professor of medicine at Stanford University, is a measure of how much "organ reserve" one possesses. Organ reserve is defined as the amount of functional ability one has available in response to a stressor in the form of an illness, accident or major life trauma. As we grow older, we generally lose organ reserve. Our immune, endocrine, and nervous systems are altered. Not only are we at greater risk of contracting infectious diseases, but we are also more susceptible to auto-immune diseases such as arthritis.

In the 1950s, Dr. Denham Harmon, from the University Of Nebraska School Of Medicine, proposed that many losses of function associated with aging are due to what he termed "free-radical damage." Free radicals are highly reactive chemical substances produced in the body, not only as a consequence of exposure to pollution, drugs, and chemicals but also as a result of natural metabolic activities. Harmon proposed that accelerated free-radical reactions may act as molecular time bombs that destroy the body's cells and result in the loss of organ reserve.

Research indicates that increased free-radical damage is associated with diseases that cause death in the elderly, including coronary heart disease and heart attack, certain forms of cancer and adult-onset diabetes.

Fortunately, our bodies are equipped with a mechanism - the antioxidant defense system - that helps protect against free-radical damage. Antioxidants are specific substances found in all cells that defuse free radicals before they have a chance to do serious damage to the body. They include vitamin E, beta carotene, vitamin C, and a variety of essential nutritional minerals, such as zinc, copper, and selenium.

Vitamin E is one of the superheroes when it comes to battling free radicals. Because it is a fat-soluble vitamin, it is attracted to cell membranes which have large amounts of fatty acids. Vitamin E prevents the oxidation of these fats by itself oxidizing and absorbing the free radicals.

Food sources of this vitamin include nuts, wheat germ, and sunflower seeds.

Vitamin C: Unlike Vitamin E, which works from the outside of cells, C does its antioxidizing job inside the cell, in its fluid (C is a water-soluble vitamin).

Food sources include: citrus fruits, amla (Indian gooseberry), strawberries, guavas and tomatoes.

Beta-carotene: Richly found in yellow-orange fruits and vegetables like mangoes, papayas, cantaloupes and carrots, beta-carotene converts to Vitamin A in the body. It is believed to be particularly effective against a highly toxic free radical called singlet oxygen.

Selenium: This trace mineral fights free radicals indirectly - by producing an enzyme which turns peroxides into harmless water. Best food sources are grains, fish, cabbage, celery and cucumber.

Zinc: another trace mineral, but this one works its effect in two ways: One, it acts as an antioxidant on its own; two, it forms part of an enzyme which protects cells against free radicals.

Good natural sources are liver, beef and nuts.

EAT RIGHT - STAY WELL!

Some of the major health-slackers and age-speeders (heart disease, osteoporosis) are often the result of faulty eating. In many cases you can reduce your disease risks as soon as you adopt good nutrition habits - even if you begin at 60.

REDUCE FATS: A high intake of fats is associated with obesity which, in turn, is connected with the onset of diseases like high blood pressure heart ailments, gall bladder problems, adult-onset diabetes and even certain forms of cancer.

You can safely reduce fats to 20 per cent of daily calories - 30 per cent is the outer limit. Of the three types of fats, saturated fats (from animal products and from vegetable sources like palm and coconut oils) are associated with the build-up of cholesterol. Monounsaturated fats (from ground nuts oil, nuts such as almond, cashews, peanuts, etc.), and polyunsaturated fats (from safflower oil sunflower oil, etc.) appear to have a cholesterol-lowering effect.

Animal fats also carry the added danger of cholesterol. One egg yolk, for instance, contains about 240 mg, which is more than most of us should consume in a whole day.

On the other hand, all fats are breeding grounds for free radicals. And the unsaturated fats are more likely to react with oxygen when cooked and form free radicals than the saturated fats. So, the bottomline is: limit all fat consumption. Try the following food swaps:

  • Substitute skim milk for whole.
  • Substitute egg whites for yolks, in omelets and other dishes.
  • If you can't stomach the idea of being a pure vegetarian, substitute skinless chicken and fish for fat-marbled red meats, sausages and cold cuts.

Also, steam, bake or eat foods raw whenever you can. If you must fry, opt for stir-frying with minimal oil in a non-stick skillet, instead of deep frying.

BONE UP ON CALCIUM:

How well you "stand up" to aging is very largely a matter of how adequate your intake of calcium has been. If you've not been getting enough, bone loss can begin in the mid-30's, in women even as early as puberty. The result: osteoporosis, that brittle bone disease that hits elderly people.

Many people don't get enough calcium in their diet (especially hard-core vegetarians who don't even take milk/dairy products). Your daily requirement: 800-1000mg. Good calcium sources are: milk and milk products; fish like sardines (where you can chew on those tiny, edible, calcium-rich bones); green leafy vegetables. But the calcium from plant sources is not as well absorbed as that from animal sources.

Also, unfortunately, aging itself blunts calcium absorption. Certain foods like coffee, tea, colas and chocolates (all of which contain caffeine) as well as tobacco, if taken at the same time as calcium, can inhibit its absorption. So do phosphorus-rich drinks like sodas.

Remember, also, that your body requires Vitamin D for the intestinal absorption of calcium. If your diet is deficient in this vitamin, you can get some of your needs from sunlight. Food sources include: liver, egg yolk, milk, butter.

WHAT ELSE...

In the run-up to a healthy old age, there are a few other things you must do:

  1. Limit salt intake to about one teaspoon a day. Excess salt consumption carries the risk of high blood pressure and its potentially fatal consequences: heart disease, stroke, kidney disease.
  2. Avoid heavy alcohol consumption. It is associated with liver damage and increased cancer risk.
  3. Give up smoking. It can cause a whole range of illness, from chronic respiratory ailments like emphysema to cancers of the lung, mouth and esophagus.

My firm belief is: "Finding a cause leads the way to find a cure". So, it is basically important to understand everything from its deepest core. And the best way to do so is: Keep on reading to develop and deepen your understanding on health and wellness at GrowTaller4IdiotsDS.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Andy_Gibson/2325820
http://EzineArticles.com/?Anti-Aging-Foods&id=9755166


What To Cook In A Crock Pot: 3 Mouth-Watering Slow Cooked Dessert Recipes

What To Cook In A Crock Pot: 3 Mouth-Watering Slow Cooked Dessert Recipes

What To Cook In A Crock Pot: 3 Mouth-Watering Slow Cooked Dessert Recipes
By Donna H.

Using a slow cooker is a versatile way of preparing a variety of dishes from appetizer to dessert. Depending on how much time you have to prepare a meal, there are quick recipes as well as several hours worth of cooking time using a crock pot. This time, why not try making sweet and mouth-watering dessert dishes that you and your family can all enjoy? Try these slow cooker dessert recipes now!

Slow Cooked Black Forest Cake

What you need:

  • 1 package chocolate cake mix
  • 1 can cherry pie filling
  • 1 can crushed pineapple, drained and juice reserved
  • 1/2 cup butter

In a saucepan, melt the butter then heat the reserved pineapple juice. Set aside. Place the crushed pineapple in a slow cooker then top with the cherry pie filling. Add chocolate cake mix to the pot then pour pineapple juice mixture all over it. Cover and cook for 3 hours on low. Spoon the cake into serving bowls and allow to cool for at least 10 minutes before serving.

Crock Pot Warm Apple Tapioca Pudding

What you need:

  • 4 cups sliced apples
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 2 tablespoons small pearl tapioca
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

In a large bowl, mix together apples, brown sugar, pearl tapioca, cinnamon and salt. Stir well to coat apple with mixture. Transfer to a slow cooker then pour lemon juice and boiling water over the mixture. Cover and cook for 3 to 4 hours on high or until apples are tender and mixture has thickened. When ready, stir in raisins before serving. Serve warm.

Slow Cooker Sweet Banana Delight

What you need:

  • 4 bananas, peeled and sliced
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup rum
  • 1/4 cup shredded coconut
  • 1/4 cup chopped walnuts
  • 4 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Mix together brown sugar, rum, butter, vanilla extract and cinnamon in a bowl. Stir to combine ingredients well. Place banana slices in a crock pot. Pour brown sugar mixture all over bananas. Cover and cook for 2 hours on low. Add coconut and walnuts to the pot 30 minutes before cooking time is up. Best served warm over vanilla ice cream.

If you're wondering what to cook in a crock pot, try these mouth-watering slow cooker dessert recipes!

Donna H. is a nutrition expert. Although not professionally, she has dedicated over a decade of her life researching and interviewing licensed nutritionists to gain the knowledge she has today - all for the love of healthy eating and dieting. She is an avid slow cooker and has contributed countless of recipes to countless popular websites.

Check out helpful tips and tricks as well as easy and delicious slow cooker recipes when using a crock pot.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Donna_H./1519703
http://EzineArticles.com/?What-To-Cook-In-A-Crock-Pot:-3-Mouth-Watering-Slow-Cooked-Dessert-Recipes&id=9760005


Is Eating Margarine Really Bad For You?

Is Eating Margarine Really Bad For You?

Submitted by: Sue Batty

In day-to-day life we use spreads a lot. They’re an essential part of our everyday eating habits; being melted on toast at breakfast time, spread on our lunchtime sandwiches and even mixed into the occasional indulgent cake and cookies. So it’s important that we make sure that the spread we’re putting in to our bodies so often is as good for us as possible.

We believe that margarine is a healthy choice of spread to make, and this is why:

Healthy margarine is made from plant oils – such as canola, soy, sunflower and many others. These natural oils contain a healthy dollop of the good fats we need to make sure we include in our diets. The word ‘fat’ can often have bad connotations, but not all fats make you gain weight or clog up your arteries. Good Housekeeping – that bastion of all things wholesome says:

“Everyone needs some fat in their diet – as a source of energy, to keep your skin and hair healthy, to make certain hormones, and to help your body absorb certain vitamins (A, D, E and K)."

So we need to make sure we’re taking in the right fats, but what are the wrong fats?

Bad fats are trans fats and saturated fats, these have been linked to heart disease, weight gain and other health problems. Margarine has less saturated fats than butter and all good spreads and margarine brands contain only traces of trans fats, so it’s the perfect choice of spread to keep your heart ticking along happily (always check the label to be sure of the fat content).

As well as the basic ingredients of margarine being a nutritious part of your diet, we even add extra goodness into it for good measure, in the form of vitamin A and vitamin D to make sure your hair, skin, bones and teeth stay strong and well. These have been added to the mix since 1925 and make sure that you and your family are able to get enough of the good stuff your bodies need.

There are loads of recipes that you can try out using margarine and it’s so simple that you can whip up a batch at home in your kitchen just by following five simple steps.

There was a Lifecycle Assessment study done on butter and margarine which analyzed the environmental impact of margarine and butter products sold in key European markets (Germany, France and the UK) throughout the entire product life cycle. In all three countries, margarine products were proven to be more environmentally favourable than butter products:

1. Margarine has less than one third the carbon footprint of butter.

2. Margarine requires about half the land occupation of butter.

3. Margarine products require 2% to 50% less energy use than butter products.

With healthy margarines being made with plant oils as one of its main ingredients so not only is it good for you, it’s good for the environment too.

So there you have it, with all of it’s good fats and vitamins margarine is great to include as part of a healthy, balanced diet.

About the Author: Sue Batty loves margarine and what she doesn’t know about cooking isn’t worth knowing! With chef, teacher, home economist and many more titles to her name, Sue is the woman in the know about all things culinary. She’s always used margarine in her cooking since she began cooking at an early age. For more info on margarine and your health, visit http://www.enjoymargarineeveryday.com/margarine-for-your-health

Source: www.isnare.com
Permanent Link: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=1895660&ca=Wellness%2C+Fitness+and+Diet


How to Cook Different Kinds of Ham

How to Cook Different Kinds of Ham

How to Cook Different Kinds of Ham
By Ray T. Lewis

Ham is usually sold in one of three conditions:

1) Fully cooked
2) Partially cooked
3) Uncooked

Although the cooking techniques are similar, there are differences between a fully cooked and a partially cooked or uncooked ham. For example, a fully cooked ham should be cooked to an internal temperature of 140 degrees Fahrenheit, while a partially cooked or uncooked one should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160 degrees.

The instructions below are grouped into sections for fully cooked and partially or uncooked hams. --

Roasting or Baking--Fully Cooked

There are three basic types of fully cooked ham:

1) Wet cured or City Ham
2) Spiral sliced
3) Canned hams

Keep in mind that a fully cooked ham does not require cooking; it can be eaten as is. But cooking it can bring out the flavors of its own juices. The flavor can also be enhanced by adding other ingredients during the baking process. A fully cooked ham should be cooked to an internal temperature of 140 degrees.

Spiral Sliced Ham

This type is pre-seasoned and does not require cooking. However, if the ham is to be served warm place it in aluminum foil, cut side down and add approximately � cup of water. Wrap ham tightly in aluminum foil and cook at 275�-300�. Allow 10 to 14 minutes per pound cooking time. Ham may be removed from oven when internal temperature reaches 135�. Allow to sit in foil for a few minutes until the internal temperature reaches 140�.

Canned Ham

Place the ham in a shallow cooking pan, uncovered. Bake at 325�. Allow 15 to 20 minutes per pound cooking time.

Wet Cured (City) Ham

This ham may be cooked either covered or uncovered.

Covered

Trim any excess skin and fat. Do not trim off all the fat as that is what produces the juices and flavor. Place ham in a roasting pan, if cut, place cut side down. Cover with aluminum foil and bake at 325 degrees. Allow 15 to 18 minutes per pound for whole hams and 18 to 24 minutes per pound for half hams. Glazes, if used, should be applied during the last thirty minutes of cooking.

Uncovered

Follow directions for covered ham, except do not cover with foil. Use same cooking temperatures and times. Apply glaze in the last 30 minutes of cooking.

Roasting or Baking Partially Cooked or Uncooked Ham

These hams are defined as Dry-Cured (Country) ham or Wet-Cured (City) Ham types. Remember, regardless of the type, these hams should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160 degrees.

Dry-Cured (Country) Ham

These hams need to be washed and soaked for up to three days before cooking. Follow the label directions on the ham for washing and soaking instructions. This type of ham can be baked covered or uncovered.

Covered

After soaking, place it in a large roasting pan with 4 to 5 cups of water. If the ham has a skinless side and a side with skin, put it in the roasting pan skin side up.

Cover the ham with aluminum foil or a cover. Put the ham in a preheated 375 degree oven and increase oven temperature to 500� and cook at this setting for the first 10 minutes only. After 10 minutes, turn the oven off and allow the ham to set for three hours without opening the oven door. Turn the oven back on to 500� again for 15 minutes. This time, the ham needs to set in the oven, without the door being opened, for 6 to 8 hours. After setting, the internal temperature of the ham should be at least 160 degrees; if not, repeat the 500 degrees setting again for 15 minutes and check the ham after 1 to 2 hours. If desired, brush with glaze before serving.

Uncovered

After soaking, place the ham in a large roasting pan with 3 cups water. Do not cover. Put the ham in a preheated 325 degree oven and cook until the internal temperature reaches 160 degrees. As a guide, a whole ham will need about 18 to 20 minutes and a half ham will need about 22 to 25 minutes cooking time per pound.

Wet-Cured (City) Ham

Use the same methods as the fully cooked wet cured hams, but remember to cook to an internal temperature of 160 degrees. Therefore, the cooking time will be a little longer than that for a fully cooked wet ham.

Ham Cooking Tips

  • Baking at lower temperatures but with increased times will result in richer flavored hams. Do not use temperatures below 200 degrees.
  • Do not pierce the ham once cooking begins-this allows beneficial juices and flavorings to escape.
  • When checking the internal temperature, avoid touching the bone with the thermometer as this can cause an incorrect reading.

Learn more about how to cook a ham and about cooking in general at these links.

Ray T. Lewis thinks that if it's pork, it tastes good. And that just about sums up his ideas on food.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Ray_T._Lewis/495719
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Need To Make Low Fat Desserts? - Top 7 Proven Techniques Help You Keep All The Taste And Flavor

Need To Make Low Fat Desserts? - Top 7 Proven Techniques Help You Keep All The Taste And Flavor

Need To Make Low Fat Desserts? - Top 7 Proven Techniques Help You Keep All The Taste And Flavor
By Janlia Chong

We all love desserts! But there nothing worse than regretting and feeling bad after a meal followed by a rich dessert. Low fat dessert recipes don't have to be boring or tasteless. In fact, by following the Top 7 Proven Techniques for low fat desserts, you will be amazed at how you can easily keep desserts on your menu!

Whether you are weight watching, dieting or just a little health conscious, there is no need to skip and deny yourself on life's simplest little treats.

Skipping desserts can actually be bad for you. You are left craving for your well-deserved treats and this can often lead to unnecessary bingeing.

All you need to do is simply make a few little changes and know where to keep your desserts as low fat as possible.

Here are seven tips on benefiting from healthy and tasty low fat desserts:

Tip 1. Do-it-Yourself

Avoid buying desserts and opt for homemade desserts. Choose quick to prepare recipes and enjoy the pleasures of homemade low fat desserts.

You will not only benefit from knowing what exactly was used in the recipe, but also appreciate the desserts more. This also leads to less cravings and avoids instant gratifications, as with store-bought treats, that can be bad for you.

And, you can lose some calories by DOING something!

Tip 2. Reduce Fats for Low Fat Dessert Recipes

When preparing your favorite dessert, reduce the amount of sugar by half.

You can (most times) also reduce the amount of fat, like butter and oils, in recipes by one-third up to to one-half! You will not lose out on too much flavor at all.

If it's a recipe that you use often, perhaps the first time you will taste a little difference, but the next time, you won't even notice that this is your same favorite dessert but with half the fat.

Tip 3. Fresh Fruit Wonders

Not only does fresh fruits add color to your desserts but they are full of natural flavor and goodness.

Choose delightful fruit salads or bake your fruits within your recipes.

Tip 4. Use Yoghurt

Use yoghurt instead of ice-cream. Yoghurt can be mixed with flavors just as ice-cream can.

The active agents within yoghurt can also help your digestive system after a meal.

Desserts that are good for you? Yes, it IS possible!

Tip 5. Go a bit Nuts!

Try choosing lower saturated nuts over the higher type (like coconut or macadamia nuts).

Nuts have some benefits to our daily diet so you do not have to completely cut it out. But a lower fat alternative would be to reduce the amount in half stated in recipes.

Chop nuts finely and spread throughout your dessert allows you to keep that nutty flavor we love. Or, instead of packing your desserts full of nuts, try to decorate by placing a toasted nut (or just even half of one) on top of you dessert. This creates a classy element to dessert and keeping it low fat at the same time.

Tip 6. I want my Chocolate

No, we are NOT going to cut out the chocolate! If you can, great! But for the rest of us, choose the better alternative - the dark chocolate.

I never thought I'd enjoy dark chocolate in the past, but now, nothing tastes better. Normal milk chocolate taste too sugary and 'fake' to me now. Not only that, dark chocolate has anti-oxidants that are good for us!

Don't abuse chocolate, but opt for dark chocolate. I swear, you will not look back! Plus, you will be thankful for the lower fat benefits.

Tip 7. Essence-tial Taste

Use essence and spices to flavor your low fat dessert recipes.

Use vanilla, almond, orange or lemon extracts to flavor your dessert.

Add nutmeg or cinnamon to bring your recipe to life.

You can also use a zest of lemon or orange peel throughout the recipe mix or simply as garnish or topping.

Being satisfied is the key to lower fat eating. By being a little creative and make tiny changes to your favorite recipes, you won't lose out on flavor nor taste.

This is the true pleasure that lies within a dessert.

~* Janlia Chong has held onto her title as Baking Sensation because of her near endless knowledge of baking and packaging treats. Her ability to impress is one of her biggest traits. What's her trick? Simple, she takes something that sounds difficult and makes it easy and fun. Follow Janlia's advice and you'll be busy baking treats for the entire family. Visit [http://www.BakingHugs.com] *~

Copyright 2006 Janlia Chong

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Janlia_Chong/30122
http://EzineArticles.com/?Need-To-Make-Low-Fat-Desserts?---Top-7-Proven-Techniques-Help-You-Keep-All-The-Taste-And-Flavor&id=165241