Nutrition

10 Most Common Ways to Cook Chicken

10 Most Common Ways to Cook Chicken

10 Most Common Ways to Cook Chicken
By Stephen G John

Chicken is one of the most common and popular foods on earth. There's an abundance of chicken in a majority of markets in many places around the world. It's being famous as an international food makes the chicken the subject of many cooking styles and approaches.

We have been eating chicken all our lives, but it didn't come to us how this tasty meat can adapt to different cooking methods.

To satisfy our curiosity, here are some of the most common ways to cook chicken:

1. Shallow-Frying

One of the most popular methods, shallow-frying cooks the chicken by soaking it in about one inch of oil. The chicken is allowed to cook, and as the first side is done, the meat is turned over to cook the other side.

2. Braising

Braising involves the cooking of large cuts of chicken by partially soaking it with liquid such as broth, cider, or wine. The cooking is done gradually and at low temperature. This results in a very tender, delicious meat.

3. Grilling

Grilling is done by cooking chicken meat over direct heat. It is the fastest method that is applicable to all cuts of meat. Even whole chicken can be grilled provided it is opened at the middle. Grilled chicken tastes the best when it is marinated before cooking and brushed with cooking oil or something that can add flavor to it.

4. Poaching

This method involves simmering the chicken in liquid until it is fully cooked. This method is typically used for making chicken broth for chicken soup or preparing the meat for low fat and low calorie dishes.

5. Spatchcock

In spatchcock cooking, the cook opens the chicken and removes the spine, the breast bone and the tips of the wings. This makes the chicken ready for roasting or grilling. Spatchcocking is usually intended to make the chicken cook in half the time than cooking it with its bones on.

6. Deep Frying

Deep-frying is a method that cooks the chicken by immersing it fully in cooking oil. This method cooks the meat quickly, especially if the cook uses a large pot to contain the meat and the oil.

7. Baking

Baking involves cooking the chicken in an oven at a temperature of between 350 - 375 degrees Fahrenheit. The cook then rubs the chicken with herbs and seasonings to make it more delicious and aromatic.

8. Stir-Frying

Stir-frying is method of cooking that is very popular in East Asia. It involves the removal of the skin and bones and the meat is fried in high temperature.

9. Sauteing

In sauteing, the chicken is chopped into small pieces and cooked thoroughly. After this, the cook adds sauce or broth into the chicken, and the entire dish is allowed to cook.

10. Stewing

Stewing is the most ideal method of cooking for dark meat chicken. Some cooks sear the meat before stewing, but this method is optional. Then he adds liquid to the pot and leaves the meat to cook at low temperature. You can actually stew chicken without having to sear it.

Stephen John is a food and wine enthusiast. He blogs about food, wine, and culture and writes wine reviews for a living. He loves to travel and try exotic cuisines of different countries. His love for good food has led him to Foodplus which made learn many things about cooking good food. Visit Foodplus website and discover why Stephen loves it.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Stephen_G_John/1361639
http://EzineArticles.com/?10-Most-Common-Ways-to-Cook-Chicken&id=7836838


Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Eating - Three High Protein Vegetables to Start Eating Today

Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Eating - Three High Protein Vegetables to Start Eating Today

Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Eating - Three High Protein Vegetables to Start Eating Today
By Beverleigh H Piepers

For most people, getting enough protein into their daily eating plan proves to be the biggest challenge they face, nutritionally speaking. Unless you are a lover of chicken breast or are diligently tracking your protein intake, there is a good chance you are currently not eating enough protein each day.

Fortunately, some vegetables will pack in more protein than many people realize. While they definitely will not give you the protein a juicy steak would, as far as vegetables go they do offer a good dose. Include these protein-packed vegetables in your daily eating plan, and you might just find it becomes easier than ever to get your needs met.

Here are three of the best vegetables to choose...

1. Edamame. Often regarded as a vegetarian-only food, do not neglect this vegetable. It packs in 10 grams of protein per cup and is super easy to prepare and eat. You can purchase this vegetable in steamer bags, making it easy just to pop them into the microwave, add a little salt and pepper, and then serve.

For something even tastier, try tossing them with a little of your favorite salad dressing before serving.

2. Corn. Few things are more delicious than fresh corn on the cob done on the BBQ. Corn is primarily a carbohydrate source, but this said, it will also give you a good dose of protein as well.

Corn packs in 8 grams of protein per half cup serving, so not to be ignored. If you combine corn with some black beans, which makes for a great combination, the beans will also provide you with a great dose of protein as well, and this can help to make a complete meal.

If you cannot find corn on the cob, canned corn works as well. Just avoid creamed corn as it has other ingredients added and is higher in fat and sugar.

3. Kale. Next up on the list is kale, which packs in 6 grams of protein per two cup serving. Kale is often regarded as one of the best superfoods you can be eating thanks to the high variety of vitamins and minerals it contains.

Serve it raw, cooked, or blended into a protein smoothie. Any which way you prefer; you will be doing your body good.

Keep these vegetables in mind and make sure you are not overlooking them. Remember there are other places you can get your protein from part from animal-based sources.

Although managing your disease can be very challenging, Type 2 diabetes is not a condition you must just live with. You can make simple changes to your daily routine and lower both your weight and your blood sugar levels. Hang in there, the longer you do it, the easier it gets.

For nearly 25 years, Beverleigh Piepers has searched for and found a number of secrets to help you build a healthy body. Go to http://DrugFreeType2Diabetes.com to learn about some of those secrets.

The answer isn't in the endless volumes of available information but in yourself.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Beverleigh_H_Piepers/123142
http://EzineArticles.com/?Type-2-Diabetes-and-Healthy-Eating---Three-High-Protein-Vegetables-to-Start-Eating-Today&id=9793368


A Different Picture Of Heart Disease

A Different Picture Of Heart Disease

A Different Picture Of Heart Disease

In Feb 2006, researchers reported that many women suffer from a fundamentally different heart disease from men and is easily missed from standard tests. Moreover, women do not seek treatment as early as men, and women's hearts are smaller and their blood vessels are more easily damaged. Another possible reason is that the disease could manifest itself differently. As a result, women are less likely to survive heart attacks than men. Many women are still unaware that heart disease and stroke have emerged as the top killers of women worldwide.

The researchers found that for some women, instead of developing obvious blockages in the arteries supplying blood to the heart, plaque are accumulated more evenly inside the major arteries and in smaller blood vessels. In other cases, their arteries fail to expand properly or go into spasm, often at times of physical or emotional stress. These abnormalities are very common for younger women and these can be dangerous because they could trigger life-threatening heart attacks.

Instead of the classic crushing chest pain, sweating and shortness of breath, they often complain of vague symptoms such as fatigue, an upset in stomach, or pain in the jaw or shoulders. This certainly explain why some women suddenly have heart attacks even though their arteries look clear and in some cases, the doctors even send them home without treatment or refer them to psychiatrists. Even if they do get medical treatment, these women may not benefit from the standard drugs or therapies such as bypass surgery and angioplasty to reopen the clogged arteries. In many cases, these women whose arteries looked clear in normal tests have a significantly higher risk of having a heart attack or dying within four or five years. The abnormalities could be due to the fact that hormonal or genetic differences change how their arteries react. In America, there are as many as three million women may suffer from these conditions.

Despite the new findings, many women do have the same kind of heart disease as men, and they do benefit from the same preventative measures and treatments that help men: a healthy diet and weight; regular exercise; and a lower blood pressure and cholesterol level. It is still unclear how best doctors can tackle such conditions, but the new findings do provide important understanding of a major health problem, and it also alerts both women and their doctors about the alternative manifestations of the disease.

Author Bio
Feel free to use this article on your website or ezine as long as the following information about author/website is included.

Heart Disease Prevention - 8 Simple Ways You Can Do Immediately, Goto: http://www.howtopreventheartdisease.com

Article Source: http://www.ArticleGeek.com - Free Website Content


Anti-Aging Foods

Anti-Aging Foods

Anti-Aging Foods
By Andy Gibson

How old are you? No, we don't mean how many birthdays have you celebrated. That's your chronological age. But how good is the pacing of your heart, the density of your bones, the agility of your mind? Their status will tell us your biological age. Some people are chronologically 40, but biologically 60, while others are chronologically 60, but biologically 40.

It's your biological age that matters. When you're biologically fit, you can throw away the calendar, for your motor is humming well and there's life in your years!

Biological age, says Dr. James Fries, professor of medicine at Stanford University, is a measure of how much "organ reserve" one possesses. Organ reserve is defined as the amount of functional ability one has available in response to a stressor in the form of an illness, accident or major life trauma. As we grow older, we generally lose organ reserve. Our immune, endocrine, and nervous systems are altered. Not only are we at greater risk of contracting infectious diseases, but we are also more susceptible to auto-immune diseases such as arthritis.

In the 1950s, Dr. Denham Harmon, from the University Of Nebraska School Of Medicine, proposed that many losses of function associated with aging are due to what he termed "free-radical damage." Free radicals are highly reactive chemical substances produced in the body, not only as a consequence of exposure to pollution, drugs, and chemicals but also as a result of natural metabolic activities. Harmon proposed that accelerated free-radical reactions may act as molecular time bombs that destroy the body's cells and result in the loss of organ reserve.

Research indicates that increased free-radical damage is associated with diseases that cause death in the elderly, including coronary heart disease and heart attack, certain forms of cancer and adult-onset diabetes.

Fortunately, our bodies are equipped with a mechanism - the antioxidant defense system - that helps protect against free-radical damage. Antioxidants are specific substances found in all cells that defuse free radicals before they have a chance to do serious damage to the body. They include vitamin E, beta carotene, vitamin C, and a variety of essential nutritional minerals, such as zinc, copper, and selenium.

Vitamin E is one of the superheroes when it comes to battling free radicals. Because it is a fat-soluble vitamin, it is attracted to cell membranes which have large amounts of fatty acids. Vitamin E prevents the oxidation of these fats by itself oxidizing and absorbing the free radicals.

Food sources of this vitamin include nuts, wheat germ, and sunflower seeds.

Vitamin C: Unlike Vitamin E, which works from the outside of cells, C does its antioxidizing job inside the cell, in its fluid (C is a water-soluble vitamin).

Food sources include: citrus fruits, amla (Indian gooseberry), strawberries, guavas and tomatoes.

Beta-carotene: Richly found in yellow-orange fruits and vegetables like mangoes, papayas, cantaloupes and carrots, beta-carotene converts to Vitamin A in the body. It is believed to be particularly effective against a highly toxic free radical called singlet oxygen.

Selenium: This trace mineral fights free radicals indirectly - by producing an enzyme which turns peroxides into harmless water. Best food sources are grains, fish, cabbage, celery and cucumber.

Zinc: another trace mineral, but this one works its effect in two ways: One, it acts as an antioxidant on its own; two, it forms part of an enzyme which protects cells against free radicals.

Good natural sources are liver, beef and nuts.

EAT RIGHT - STAY WELL!

Some of the major health-slackers and age-speeders (heart disease, osteoporosis) are often the result of faulty eating. In many cases you can reduce your disease risks as soon as you adopt good nutrition habits - even if you begin at 60.

REDUCE FATS: A high intake of fats is associated with obesity which, in turn, is connected with the onset of diseases like high blood pressure heart ailments, gall bladder problems, adult-onset diabetes and even certain forms of cancer.

You can safely reduce fats to 20 per cent of daily calories - 30 per cent is the outer limit. Of the three types of fats, saturated fats (from animal products and from vegetable sources like palm and coconut oils) are associated with the build-up of cholesterol. Monounsaturated fats (from ground nuts oil, nuts such as almond, cashews, peanuts, etc.), and polyunsaturated fats (from safflower oil sunflower oil, etc.) appear to have a cholesterol-lowering effect.

Animal fats also carry the added danger of cholesterol. One egg yolk, for instance, contains about 240 mg, which is more than most of us should consume in a whole day.

On the other hand, all fats are breeding grounds for free radicals. And the unsaturated fats are more likely to react with oxygen when cooked and form free radicals than the saturated fats. So, the bottomline is: limit all fat consumption. Try the following food swaps:

  • Substitute skim milk for whole.
  • Substitute egg whites for yolks, in omelets and other dishes.
  • If you can't stomach the idea of being a pure vegetarian, substitute skinless chicken and fish for fat-marbled red meats, sausages and cold cuts.

Also, steam, bake or eat foods raw whenever you can. If you must fry, opt for stir-frying with minimal oil in a non-stick skillet, instead of deep frying.

BONE UP ON CALCIUM:

How well you "stand up" to aging is very largely a matter of how adequate your intake of calcium has been. If you've not been getting enough, bone loss can begin in the mid-30's, in women even as early as puberty. The result: osteoporosis, that brittle bone disease that hits elderly people.

Many people don't get enough calcium in their diet (especially hard-core vegetarians who don't even take milk/dairy products). Your daily requirement: 800-1000mg. Good calcium sources are: milk and milk products; fish like sardines (where you can chew on those tiny, edible, calcium-rich bones); green leafy vegetables. But the calcium from plant sources is not as well absorbed as that from animal sources.

Also, unfortunately, aging itself blunts calcium absorption. Certain foods like coffee, tea, colas and chocolates (all of which contain caffeine) as well as tobacco, if taken at the same time as calcium, can inhibit its absorption. So do phosphorus-rich drinks like sodas.

Remember, also, that your body requires Vitamin D for the intestinal absorption of calcium. If your diet is deficient in this vitamin, you can get some of your needs from sunlight. Food sources include: liver, egg yolk, milk, butter.

WHAT ELSE...

In the run-up to a healthy old age, there are a few other things you must do:

  1. Limit salt intake to about one teaspoon a day. Excess salt consumption carries the risk of high blood pressure and its potentially fatal consequences: heart disease, stroke, kidney disease.
  2. Avoid heavy alcohol consumption. It is associated with liver damage and increased cancer risk.
  3. Give up smoking. It can cause a whole range of illness, from chronic respiratory ailments like emphysema to cancers of the lung, mouth and esophagus.

My firm belief is: "Finding a cause leads the way to find a cure". So, it is basically important to understand everything from its deepest core. And the best way to do so is: Keep on reading to develop and deepen your understanding on health and wellness at GrowTaller4IdiotsDS.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Andy_Gibson/2325820
http://EzineArticles.com/?Anti-Aging-Foods&id=9755166


What To Cook In A Crock Pot: 3 Mouth-Watering Slow Cooked Dessert Recipes

What To Cook In A Crock Pot: 3 Mouth-Watering Slow Cooked Dessert Recipes

What To Cook In A Crock Pot: 3 Mouth-Watering Slow Cooked Dessert Recipes
By Donna H.

Using a slow cooker is a versatile way of preparing a variety of dishes from appetizer to dessert. Depending on how much time you have to prepare a meal, there are quick recipes as well as several hours worth of cooking time using a crock pot. This time, why not try making sweet and mouth-watering dessert dishes that you and your family can all enjoy? Try these slow cooker dessert recipes now!

Slow Cooked Black Forest Cake

What you need:

  • 1 package chocolate cake mix
  • 1 can cherry pie filling
  • 1 can crushed pineapple, drained and juice reserved
  • 1/2 cup butter

In a saucepan, melt the butter then heat the reserved pineapple juice. Set aside. Place the crushed pineapple in a slow cooker then top with the cherry pie filling. Add chocolate cake mix to the pot then pour pineapple juice mixture all over it. Cover and cook for 3 hours on low. Spoon the cake into serving bowls and allow to cool for at least 10 minutes before serving.

Crock Pot Warm Apple Tapioca Pudding

What you need:

  • 4 cups sliced apples
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 2 tablespoons small pearl tapioca
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

In a large bowl, mix together apples, brown sugar, pearl tapioca, cinnamon and salt. Stir well to coat apple with mixture. Transfer to a slow cooker then pour lemon juice and boiling water over the mixture. Cover and cook for 3 to 4 hours on high or until apples are tender and mixture has thickened. When ready, stir in raisins before serving. Serve warm.

Slow Cooker Sweet Banana Delight

What you need:

  • 4 bananas, peeled and sliced
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup rum
  • 1/4 cup shredded coconut
  • 1/4 cup chopped walnuts
  • 4 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Mix together brown sugar, rum, butter, vanilla extract and cinnamon in a bowl. Stir to combine ingredients well. Place banana slices in a crock pot. Pour brown sugar mixture all over bananas. Cover and cook for 2 hours on low. Add coconut and walnuts to the pot 30 minutes before cooking time is up. Best served warm over vanilla ice cream.

If you're wondering what to cook in a crock pot, try these mouth-watering slow cooker dessert recipes!

Donna H. is a nutrition expert. Although not professionally, she has dedicated over a decade of her life researching and interviewing licensed nutritionists to gain the knowledge she has today - all for the love of healthy eating and dieting. She is an avid slow cooker and has contributed countless of recipes to countless popular websites.

Check out helpful tips and tricks as well as easy and delicious slow cooker recipes when using a crock pot.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Donna_H./1519703
http://EzineArticles.com/?What-To-Cook-In-A-Crock-Pot:-3-Mouth-Watering-Slow-Cooked-Dessert-Recipes&id=9760005


Is Eating Margarine Really Bad For You?

Is Eating Margarine Really Bad For You?

Submitted by: Sue Batty

In day-to-day life we use spreads a lot. They’re an essential part of our everyday eating habits; being melted on toast at breakfast time, spread on our lunchtime sandwiches and even mixed into the occasional indulgent cake and cookies. So it’s important that we make sure that the spread we’re putting in to our bodies so often is as good for us as possible.

We believe that margarine is a healthy choice of spread to make, and this is why:

Healthy margarine is made from plant oils – such as canola, soy, sunflower and many others. These natural oils contain a healthy dollop of the good fats we need to make sure we include in our diets. The word ‘fat’ can often have bad connotations, but not all fats make you gain weight or clog up your arteries. Good Housekeeping – that bastion of all things wholesome says:

“Everyone needs some fat in their diet – as a source of energy, to keep your skin and hair healthy, to make certain hormones, and to help your body absorb certain vitamins (A, D, E and K)."

So we need to make sure we’re taking in the right fats, but what are the wrong fats?

Bad fats are trans fats and saturated fats, these have been linked to heart disease, weight gain and other health problems. Margarine has less saturated fats than butter and all good spreads and margarine brands contain only traces of trans fats, so it’s the perfect choice of spread to keep your heart ticking along happily (always check the label to be sure of the fat content).

As well as the basic ingredients of margarine being a nutritious part of your diet, we even add extra goodness into it for good measure, in the form of vitamin A and vitamin D to make sure your hair, skin, bones and teeth stay strong and well. These have been added to the mix since 1925 and make sure that you and your family are able to get enough of the good stuff your bodies need.

There are loads of recipes that you can try out using margarine and it’s so simple that you can whip up a batch at home in your kitchen just by following five simple steps.

There was a Lifecycle Assessment study done on butter and margarine which analyzed the environmental impact of margarine and butter products sold in key European markets (Germany, France and the UK) throughout the entire product life cycle. In all three countries, margarine products were proven to be more environmentally favourable than butter products:

1. Margarine has less than one third the carbon footprint of butter.

2. Margarine requires about half the land occupation of butter.

3. Margarine products require 2% to 50% less energy use than butter products.

With healthy margarines being made with plant oils as one of its main ingredients so not only is it good for you, it’s good for the environment too.

So there you have it, with all of it’s good fats and vitamins margarine is great to include as part of a healthy, balanced diet.

About the Author: Sue Batty loves margarine and what she doesn’t know about cooking isn’t worth knowing! With chef, teacher, home economist and many more titles to her name, Sue is the woman in the know about all things culinary. She’s always used margarine in her cooking since she began cooking at an early age. For more info on margarine and your health, visit http://www.enjoymargarineeveryday.com/margarine-for-your-health

Source: www.isnare.com
Permanent Link: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=1895660&ca=Wellness%2C+Fitness+and+Diet


How to Cook Different Kinds of Ham

How to Cook Different Kinds of Ham

How to Cook Different Kinds of Ham
By Ray T. Lewis

Ham is usually sold in one of three conditions:

1) Fully cooked
2) Partially cooked
3) Uncooked

Although the cooking techniques are similar, there are differences between a fully cooked and a partially cooked or uncooked ham. For example, a fully cooked ham should be cooked to an internal temperature of 140 degrees Fahrenheit, while a partially cooked or uncooked one should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160 degrees.

The instructions below are grouped into sections for fully cooked and partially or uncooked hams. --

Roasting or Baking--Fully Cooked

There are three basic types of fully cooked ham:

1) Wet cured or City Ham
2) Spiral sliced
3) Canned hams

Keep in mind that a fully cooked ham does not require cooking; it can be eaten as is. But cooking it can bring out the flavors of its own juices. The flavor can also be enhanced by adding other ingredients during the baking process. A fully cooked ham should be cooked to an internal temperature of 140 degrees.

Spiral Sliced Ham

This type is pre-seasoned and does not require cooking. However, if the ham is to be served warm place it in aluminum foil, cut side down and add approximately � cup of water. Wrap ham tightly in aluminum foil and cook at 275�-300�. Allow 10 to 14 minutes per pound cooking time. Ham may be removed from oven when internal temperature reaches 135�. Allow to sit in foil for a few minutes until the internal temperature reaches 140�.

Canned Ham

Place the ham in a shallow cooking pan, uncovered. Bake at 325�. Allow 15 to 20 minutes per pound cooking time.

Wet Cured (City) Ham

This ham may be cooked either covered or uncovered.

Covered

Trim any excess skin and fat. Do not trim off all the fat as that is what produces the juices and flavor. Place ham in a roasting pan, if cut, place cut side down. Cover with aluminum foil and bake at 325 degrees. Allow 15 to 18 minutes per pound for whole hams and 18 to 24 minutes per pound for half hams. Glazes, if used, should be applied during the last thirty minutes of cooking.

Uncovered

Follow directions for covered ham, except do not cover with foil. Use same cooking temperatures and times. Apply glaze in the last 30 minutes of cooking.

Roasting or Baking Partially Cooked or Uncooked Ham

These hams are defined as Dry-Cured (Country) ham or Wet-Cured (City) Ham types. Remember, regardless of the type, these hams should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160 degrees.

Dry-Cured (Country) Ham

These hams need to be washed and soaked for up to three days before cooking. Follow the label directions on the ham for washing and soaking instructions. This type of ham can be baked covered or uncovered.

Covered

After soaking, place it in a large roasting pan with 4 to 5 cups of water. If the ham has a skinless side and a side with skin, put it in the roasting pan skin side up.

Cover the ham with aluminum foil or a cover. Put the ham in a preheated 375 degree oven and increase oven temperature to 500� and cook at this setting for the first 10 minutes only. After 10 minutes, turn the oven off and allow the ham to set for three hours without opening the oven door. Turn the oven back on to 500� again for 15 minutes. This time, the ham needs to set in the oven, without the door being opened, for 6 to 8 hours. After setting, the internal temperature of the ham should be at least 160 degrees; if not, repeat the 500 degrees setting again for 15 minutes and check the ham after 1 to 2 hours. If desired, brush with glaze before serving.

Uncovered

After soaking, place the ham in a large roasting pan with 3 cups water. Do not cover. Put the ham in a preheated 325 degree oven and cook until the internal temperature reaches 160 degrees. As a guide, a whole ham will need about 18 to 20 minutes and a half ham will need about 22 to 25 minutes cooking time per pound.

Wet-Cured (City) Ham

Use the same methods as the fully cooked wet cured hams, but remember to cook to an internal temperature of 160 degrees. Therefore, the cooking time will be a little longer than that for a fully cooked wet ham.

Ham Cooking Tips

  • Baking at lower temperatures but with increased times will result in richer flavored hams. Do not use temperatures below 200 degrees.
  • Do not pierce the ham once cooking begins-this allows beneficial juices and flavorings to escape.
  • When checking the internal temperature, avoid touching the bone with the thermometer as this can cause an incorrect reading.

Learn more about how to cook a ham and about cooking in general at these links.

Ray T. Lewis thinks that if it's pork, it tastes good. And that just about sums up his ideas on food.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Ray_T._Lewis/495719
http://EzineArticles.com/?How-to-Cook-Different-Kinds-of-Ham&id=4298997


Postpartum Stress Survival Tips For New Moms After Having A Baby

Postpartum Stress Survival Tips For New Moms After Having A Baby

Postpartum Stress Survival Tips For New Moms After Having A Baby
By Hannah Bajor

Postpartum is part of pregnancy. It is the 6 to 8 weeks after having a baby. For a new mom these weeks can be a very stressful, challenging and confusing for new moms. Read on for great postpartum stress survival tips to make this precious new mother/child transitional period less stressful, less traumatic, easier and more enjoyable for you and your new baby.

As a midwife I put a lot of thought and effort into my pregnancy and birthing experience. My first son was born at home in a birthing pool surrounded by people I loved. But none of my midwifery knowledge prepared me for the first few weeks after having a baby. For me the postpartum part of pregnancy was very stressful and physically challenging. I had a long labor and every part of my body hurt. It felt like I had been hit by a truck. I share with you some post delivery stress reducing survival tips that made the end of my second pregnancy more enjoyable.

Arrange help for the household chores: Believe me; you will be too exhausted to keep up with everything postpartum. Don't be afraid to ask for help during your pregnancy or request a home cleaning gift certificate as a great baby shower gift that can be used after having a baby.

Stock your freezer with pre-cooked meals: New moms get hungry at odd hours and it is not unusual to be too tired to cook.

Schedule chiropractic adjustments during the first week postpartum: Pregnancy and childbirth moves many of your pelvic bones out of alignment (even if you have a cesarean section birth). Use the expertise of your chiropractor to realign your pelvis, hips and back. This will definitely expedite your recovery following birth.

Have a good supply of large sanitary napkins and adult diapers in your hospital bag and at home. I am not kidding! After pregnancy new moms will experience very heavy bleeding and regular sanitary towels will not do the job. Most hospitals give new moms cheap sanitary towels postpartum. This will also save your bed linen from been destroyed.

Sleep when your baby sleeps. As a new mom postpartum be prepared to be exhausted. Take every opportunity to sleep whenever your baby sleeps.

Don't be afraid to cry (and don't worry about it). Pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum results in changing levels of hormones. After childbirth there is a rapid decrease in hormones that occurs approximately on the third, fifth and tenth day. These hormone adjustments can be emotionally challenging for the mother. You may cry for no apparent reason so let it out and know this is all part of a normal pregnancy postpartum.

Supplement with vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that are breast-feeding safe: Every organ and system in your body is under a lot of physical stress postpartum as they attempt to return to their normal non pregnancy state. High quality vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that are safe for breast-feeding will provide the foundation to prevent post delivery complications and result in an overall a better pregnancy experience.

Having a new baby is a wonderful time in a woman's life. Knowing the above plan ahead and think of ways to support yourself physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually ahead of time before you are all consumed with your new baby. I am a great believer in the good internal health of the body for optimum health and pretension of stress, sickness, disease and depression. I highly recommend all pregnant and new moms supplement with high quality vitamins, minerals and antioxidants needed to support the many challenges of pregnancy, birth and motherhood.

Motherhood can be an extraordinary, yet exhausting experience for a woman. Pregnancy has a huge emotional, mental, spiritual, and energetic side to it. The more you understand these aspects, the easier and less symptomatic your pregnancy and postpartum will be. Learning how to connect with the emotions of your new baby will allow you to enhance your postpartum experience and create a strong bond between you and your baby. It will also allow your baby to be more contented and be an easier child to manage.

If you are facing any emotional challenges after having a baby then you are not alone. Then please do not be afraid to reach out for help and seek professional support, remember you baby has picked you out of all the mothers in the world to be his or her mother. Once you have made the adjustments to motherhood, you will be a great mother!

Midwife Hannah Bajor C.N.M., M.S.N. is founder, CEO and Visionary behind the Lumalove® brand of getting pregnant, pregnancy, infertility and miscarriage educational support products and services.

Hannah says "knowing my life's purpose gives one a hug advantage". Her 30 years midwifery experience along with her personal journey through ten years of infertility, having personally experienced a 16 week miscarriage and a near death experience delivering her second child has lit a fire in her soul that NO ONE can put out and that is to "change childbirth education as we know it".

Lumalove LLC helps couples globally access new and dynamic prenatal education and in doing so lays the foundational blueprints for a happier, healthier pregnancy outcome and gives their unborn child the opportunity of unlimited potential.

Take advantage of her FREE offer to self assess what energy centers may be out of balance and adding to the challenges of adjusting to motherhood. To get your FREE Lumalove Self Assessment Of Your Energy Centers click on [http://www.LumaloveGettingPregnant.com]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Hannah_Bajor/238593
http://EzineArticles.com/?Postpartum-Stress-Survival-Tips-For-New-Moms-After-Having-A-Baby&id=5976619


Need To Make Low Fat Desserts? - Top 7 Proven Techniques Help You Keep All The Taste And Flavor

Need To Make Low Fat Desserts? - Top 7 Proven Techniques Help You Keep All The Taste And Flavor

Need To Make Low Fat Desserts? - Top 7 Proven Techniques Help You Keep All The Taste And Flavor
By Janlia Chong

We all love desserts! But there nothing worse than regretting and feeling bad after a meal followed by a rich dessert. Low fat dessert recipes don't have to be boring or tasteless. In fact, by following the Top 7 Proven Techniques for low fat desserts, you will be amazed at how you can easily keep desserts on your menu!

Whether you are weight watching, dieting or just a little health conscious, there is no need to skip and deny yourself on life's simplest little treats.

Skipping desserts can actually be bad for you. You are left craving for your well-deserved treats and this can often lead to unnecessary bingeing.

All you need to do is simply make a few little changes and know where to keep your desserts as low fat as possible.

Here are seven tips on benefiting from healthy and tasty low fat desserts:

Tip 1. Do-it-Yourself

Avoid buying desserts and opt for homemade desserts. Choose quick to prepare recipes and enjoy the pleasures of homemade low fat desserts.

You will not only benefit from knowing what exactly was used in the recipe, but also appreciate the desserts more. This also leads to less cravings and avoids instant gratifications, as with store-bought treats, that can be bad for you.

And, you can lose some calories by DOING something!

Tip 2. Reduce Fats for Low Fat Dessert Recipes

When preparing your favorite dessert, reduce the amount of sugar by half.

You can (most times) also reduce the amount of fat, like butter and oils, in recipes by one-third up to to one-half! You will not lose out on too much flavor at all.

If it's a recipe that you use often, perhaps the first time you will taste a little difference, but the next time, you won't even notice that this is your same favorite dessert but with half the fat.

Tip 3. Fresh Fruit Wonders

Not only does fresh fruits add color to your desserts but they are full of natural flavor and goodness.

Choose delightful fruit salads or bake your fruits within your recipes.

Tip 4. Use Yoghurt

Use yoghurt instead of ice-cream. Yoghurt can be mixed with flavors just as ice-cream can.

The active agents within yoghurt can also help your digestive system after a meal.

Desserts that are good for you? Yes, it IS possible!

Tip 5. Go a bit Nuts!

Try choosing lower saturated nuts over the higher type (like coconut or macadamia nuts).

Nuts have some benefits to our daily diet so you do not have to completely cut it out. But a lower fat alternative would be to reduce the amount in half stated in recipes.

Chop nuts finely and spread throughout your dessert allows you to keep that nutty flavor we love. Or, instead of packing your desserts full of nuts, try to decorate by placing a toasted nut (or just even half of one) on top of you dessert. This creates a classy element to dessert and keeping it low fat at the same time.

Tip 6. I want my Chocolate

No, we are NOT going to cut out the chocolate! If you can, great! But for the rest of us, choose the better alternative - the dark chocolate.

I never thought I'd enjoy dark chocolate in the past, but now, nothing tastes better. Normal milk chocolate taste too sugary and 'fake' to me now. Not only that, dark chocolate has anti-oxidants that are good for us!

Don't abuse chocolate, but opt for dark chocolate. I swear, you will not look back! Plus, you will be thankful for the lower fat benefits.

Tip 7. Essence-tial Taste

Use essence and spices to flavor your low fat dessert recipes.

Use vanilla, almond, orange or lemon extracts to flavor your dessert.

Add nutmeg or cinnamon to bring your recipe to life.

You can also use a zest of lemon or orange peel throughout the recipe mix or simply as garnish or topping.

Being satisfied is the key to lower fat eating. By being a little creative and make tiny changes to your favorite recipes, you won't lose out on flavor nor taste.

This is the true pleasure that lies within a dessert.

~* Janlia Chong has held onto her title as Baking Sensation because of her near endless knowledge of baking and packaging treats. Her ability to impress is one of her biggest traits. What's her trick? Simple, she takes something that sounds difficult and makes it easy and fun. Follow Janlia's advice and you'll be busy baking treats for the entire family. Visit [http://www.BakingHugs.com] *~

Copyright 2006 Janlia Chong

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Janlia_Chong/30122
http://EzineArticles.com/?Need-To-Make-Low-Fat-Desserts?---Top-7-Proven-Techniques-Help-You-Keep-All-The-Taste-And-Flavor&id=165241


The Lifespan of a Dental Bridge

The Lifespan of a Dental Bridge

The Lifespan of a Dental Bridge
By Gerald McConway

For those who may not know, a dental bridge is a replacement for a lost tooth, and this replacement can help prevent future dental problems once the neighboring teeth begin changing position in order to fill in the gap left by the lost tooth.

A bridge can play a critical role in one's oral healthcare, and if patients put in the time and care required for it, their bridge could last for ten years or possibly even longer. However, the specific number of years a bridge lasts can vary from person to person-specifically, individual diets and oral healthcare routines affect how long its lifespan will be.

Regarding the lifespans of dental bridges, authorities on the subject have differing opinions. The Cleveland Clinic suggests a bridge lasts between five and seven years on average while certain types may last over a decade. Per the University of Rochester Medical Center, a bridge could last well over ten years or even a lifetime with good oral healthcare.

What Causes Dental Bridges to Fail

To fit this device into a into a person's mouth, the teeth adjacent to a gap must be filed down. This prepares those teeth for crowns that will support the bridge, but this process can increase the likelihood of gum disease and tooth decay within and around those filed teeth, making root canals much more likely. When supporting teeth fail, this can cause the entire bridge to fail as well.

Preventing Bridge Failures

A few easy ways to help prevent a bridge from failing include avoiding food that could put stress on the bridge as well as implementing a teeth-friendly diet. Specifically, patients should eat more fiber, fruits, and vegetables than they do meat, and they could also benefit from eating fewer starchy and sugary foods since these foods can lead to tooth decay.

As well, avoiding nuts, popcorn, caramel, chewing or hard candy, and other hard or sticky snacks can help prolong a bridge's lifespan. These types of foods could put too much pressure on the bridge during chewing.

Bridge Maintenance

As with general oral healthcare routines, bridge care involves regular brushing with a fluoride toothpaste and flossing, which covers the outside of a bridge. However, food can get trapped underneath the bridge where it's hard to remove, exposing surrounding teeth to decay.

For this issue, dentists often recommend floss threaders for getting under a bridge and removing trapped food particles. As well, it may benefit bridge patients to get a professional bridge cleaning every six months.

With the rising costs of dental care, seniors need to consider senior discount dental plans to avoid health problems that may arise due to poor oral health. For more information, please visit Wellness Dental Plan today.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Gerald_McConway/528288
http://EzineArticles.com/?The-Lifespan-of-a-Dental-Bridge&id=9772239